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From Harvard to ‘La La Land’

By on March 1, 2021

first_img A movie as a mirror Related In 2014, came their next collaboration, “Whiplash,” an unflinching look at a rising jazz drummer, his abusive instructor, and how far some will go for their art. The movie earned critical acclaim, three Oscars (sound mixing, editing, and supporting actor), and the backing Chazelle needed to finish “La La Land,” a project he had begun in 2011.Though Chazelle didn’t write the screenplay for “Whiplash” until after he had moved to Los Angeles, the story reflected some of the drive and determination of those long nights at Currier House, Hurwitz said.“Damien and I really bonded over this shared philosophy sophomore year of working really hard and sacrificing … I remember we would really egg each other on and make each other feel guilty for not working hard enough. And we just had a lot of conversations about how we both wanted to be really, really good at what we do, and what it would take.”For Hurwitz, part of the answer was an eye-opening class, “Music 51,” which he called “the most life-changing thing I did at Harvard.” Professor John Stewart used Johann Sebastian Bach’s chorales, complex works for four voices that are widely considered masterpieces, to introduce his students to the building blocks of composition — counterpoint, rhythm, timbre, harmony, and form.Hurwitz was a natural. Piano practice in high school could be “like pulling teeth,” he recalled, but with composing, something he started at the age of 10, “the hours would just kind of disappear.”Stewart encouraged Hurwitz to follow Bach’s lead and treat “harmonies as full of little melodies instead of just blocks of notes,” and to pay close attention to the German composer’s use of “dissonances and resolutions.” Hurwitz credits the class for much of the “controlled dissonance” in his own work and for opening up “a lot of possibilities to me as a composer.”In 2005, Professor Joshua Fineberg worked with Hurwitz for an independent study on orchestration. They examined various scores, including the original piano work and later orchestrated version of Modest Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition,” and explored ways to write for particular instruments.Fineberg, now at Boston University, lauded Hurwitz’s drive to carve out his own path at Harvard and pursue his dream of scoring music for films.“It was clear [he and Chazelle] were super-motivated,” Fineberg recalled, “and that Justin knew the kind of thing he wanted to do from very early on.”Today Hurwitz brings the rigor he honed at Harvard to his work with Chazelle. He begins by plucking out a tune at the piano that he records and emails to the director, who typically says “no.” Hurwitz keeps sending files until finally the right answer comes back: “That’s incredible. I love it.” The process can take weeks, and involve hundreds of rejected clips.Though “La La Land” was inspired by past musicals, including Jacques Demy’s “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg” (1964) and “The Young Girls of Rochefort” (1967), Hurwitz was determined to give his score a unique sound.“I was deliberately trying not to listen to anything while I was composing,” he said, “and instead was just reading the script and reading the story and thinking about what was honest for this movie.”The result is a hummable hybrid with big dance numbers, jazz-influenced melodies, and haunting songs such as “City of Stars.”“I love emotional and emotionally complex music and being able to compose what people are feeling,” Hurwitz said, adding, “sometimes with film scores you want to cut against what is on screen and do the opposite to provide a counterpoint … but with musicals, you can compose very emotionally.”It was an emotional night for the Harvard-bred duo when “La La Land” made Golden Globes history by taking home all seven awards for which it had been nominated. After the ceremony Chazelle told the press the highlight of his evening was seeing his former roommate up on stage. That, said Chazelle, “was actually the single greatest moment for me.”SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave Justin Hurwitz never even considered conservatory training. An accomplished pianist, the Los Angeles native wanted more from his college years than countless hours of practice and rehearsals.So he attended Harvard. And it changed his life.“I knew I wanted to study music but I also knew I wanted to go to school with a more diverse group,” said Hurwitz, whose score and original song “City of Stars” for the musical “La La Land” earned Golden Globes earlier this month, intensifying the Oscars buzz that has been swirling around the movie since the fall.On Tuesday, “La La Land” received 14 Oscar nominations, a tie with “Titanic” and “All About Eve” for the most in Academy Award history.The film, a love letter to song-and-dance spectaculars from the ’40s, ’50s, and ’60s, stars Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling as struggling artists who dream of making it big in Hollywood. The storyline struck a chord with Hurwitz, whose own dreams of success began taking shape in Cambridge in 2003.On the phone recently from Los Angeles, the composer recalled being told a key Harvard takeaway would be “the people you meet.” It was a spot-on prediction. As a freshman he met Damien Chazelle, a skilled jazz drummer whose budding passion for film foreshadowed the screenplay and director Golden Globes he took home for “La La Land.”A scene from the opening number of the hit musical “La La Land.” Photo by Dale Robinette/LionsgateA shared love of music brought the pair together. As freshmen they jammed around Boston with their Brit-pop-inspired band “Chester French” — Chazelle on the drums, Hurwitz on a Fender Rhodes electric piano.“We were just kind of drawn to each other,” said Hurwitz.Sophomore year the pair left the band, but their friendship deepened. As roommates at Currier House, in a space crowded with desks and Hurwitz’s piano, they pushed each other’s artistic boundaries, skipping parties and nights out to hone their respective crafts.“He was writing screenplays at the time and directing short films for Harvard’s Department of Visual and Environmental Studies and I started to really appreciate who he was as a writer-director,” said Hurwitz. “And he was watching what I was working on, composing at my piano … and he started to appreciate what I do.”Soon they were working on the jazzy musical “Guy and Madeline on a Park Bench.” The film, Chazelle’s senior thesis and a precursor to “La La Land,” made a splash on the festival circuit in 2009. Industry insiders took note. Young Harvard alumni explain the genesis, process of making hit film ‘Whiplash’ last_img read more

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Reducing Wait Times With a New I/O Bottleneck Buster

By on February 27, 2021

first_imgThe Data Accelerator from Dell Technologies breaks through I/O bottlenecks that impede the performance of HPC workloadsIn high performance computing, big advances in system architectures are seldom made by a single company working in isolation. To raise the system performance bar to a higher level, it typically takes a collaborative effort among technology companies, system builders and system users. And that’s what it took to develop the Data Accelerator (DAC) from Dell Technologies.This unique solution to a long-running I/O challenge was developed in a collaborative effort that drew on the expertise of HPC specialists from Dell Technologies, Intel, the University of Cambridge and StackHPC. The resulting solution, DAC, enables the next generation of data‑intensive workflows in HPC systems with an NVMe‑based storage solution that removes storage bottlenecks that slow system performance.How so? DAC is designed to make optimal use of modern server NVMe fabric technologies to mitigate I/O‑related performance issues. To accelerate system performance, DAC proactively copies data from a cluster’s disk storage subsystem and pre-stages it on fast NVMe storage devices that can feed data to the application at a rate required for top performance. Even better, this unique architecture allows HPC administrators to leave data on cost-effective disk storage until it is required by an application, at which point the data is cached on the DAC nodes.Plunge FrozenCryogenic Electron Microscopy (Cryo-EM) with Relion is one of the key applications for analyzing and processing these large data sets. Greater resolution brings challenges — as the volume of data ingest from such instruments increases dramatically, and the compute requirements for processing and analyzing this data explode.The Relion refinement pipeline is an iterative process that performs multiple iterations over the same data to find the best structure. As the total volume of data can be tens of terabytes in size, this is beyond the memory capacity of almost all current-generation computers and thus, the data must be repeatedly read from the file system. The bottleneck in application performance moves to the I/O.A recent challenging test case produced by Cambridge research staff has a size of 20TB. The I/O time for this test case on the Cumulus traditional Lustre file system versus the new NVMe DAC reduces I/O wait times from over an hour to just a couple of minutes.The Data Accelerator in the Cumulus supercomputer incorporates components from Dell Technologies, Intel and Cambridge University, along with an innovative orchestrator built by the University of Cambridge and StackHPC.With its innovative features, DAC delivers one of the world’s fastest open‑source NVMe storage solutions. In fact, with the initial implementation of DAC, the Cumulus supercomputer at the University of Cambridge reached No. 1 in the June 2019 I/O-500 list. That means it debuted as the world’s fastest HPC storage system, nearly doubling the performance of the second‑place entry.And here’s where this story gets even better. Today, Dell Technologies is sharing the goodness of DAC by making the solution available to the broad community of HPC users via an engineering-validated system configuration covering DAC server nodes, memory, networking, PCIe storage and NVMe storage.Ready for a deeper dive?For a closer look at DAC, including system configuration details, see the Data Accelerator solution brief.For a detailed technical examination of the DAC architecture and development effort, see “HPC Innovation Exchange: The Data Accelerator.”To download the DAC software stack, visit Cambridge University GitHub page.Read the Dell Technologies case study with Cambridge University.last_img read more

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Lawyers, judges honored for public service

By on December 19, 2020

first_img Lawyers, judges honored for public service July 15, 2002 Regular News The General Assembly ceremony was awash in awards and applause. Here are the highlights of the honors bestowed upon lawyers that day: G. Kirk Haas Humanitarian Award to Larry S. Stewart. This award “recognizes the unique human qualities that all strive to attain but very few achieve. These include an abiding respect and caring for others, coupled with the ongoing demonstration of actual deeds of legal service with no reward beyond that of the deed itself. “Larry S. Stewart is one of those rare individuals who possesses those special qualities, and by the award, he is so honored.”Outgoing Bar President Terry Russell said: “This one was not tough at all to choose. In response to the September 11 tragedy, Larry launched a monumental project called ‘Trial Lawyers Care,’ which was created by the Association of Trial Lawyers of America to provide free legal services to the families of thousands of victims of the terrorist attacks who would receive compensation through an expedited federal fund.“This project set up a brand new law office in New York: renting space and equipment, hiring support staff, and rallying enough volunteer lawyers from around the country to take on potentially thousands of clients. ATLA and Mr. Stewart worked with the New York Trial Lawyers to help set up a finance committee to raise money for office expenses.“The fund compensates ‘any individual (or relative of a deceased individual) who was physically injured or killed as a result of the terrorist-related aircraft crashes of September 11, 2001,’ who opt into the program.“Claimants do not have to prove negligence or any other theory of liability. If they choose not to participate in the fund, victims may still pursue traditional remedies through the civil justice system.“Larry Stewart, himself, was quoted as saying, ‘In the nearly 40 years that I have practiced law, I have never witnessed such an overwhelming response by trial lawyers to answer the call to help their fellow Americans. All over the country, lawyers put their practices on hold so that they could put the interests of injured people first.’”Russell concluded: “I observed, and I credit much to his program, a four-point statistical increase in the positive image of the profession after the Trial Lawyers Care program. I think it had a tremendously dramatic impact on the good positive image of our profession.” President’s Award of Merit to 11th Circuit Judge Sandy Karlan, chair, The Florida Bar Commission on the Legal Needs of Children, 1999-2002. “In recognition of dedication and distinguished service to the Bar and to the public we serve, especially all of Florida’s children who appear in our courtrooms, and for your sincere commitment to lead this commission in developing a vision and recommendations so that children can be assured the right to be represented, defended, protected, served, and heard. Our system of justice and the futures of our children will benefit greatly from your work.”As Russell said: “Led by Judge Karlan, The Florida Bar Commission on the Legal Needs of Children is composed of diverse members who care deeply about what happens to children in Florida’s courts.“Since October 29, 1999, the panel’s mission has been to help children who appear in Florida’s courtrooms in any capacity, whether as victims, witnesses, defendants, or respondents.“Commissioners determined early on in their work that they must seek answers from the children involved in the legal system. They listened to the children, to experts, and to each other to discover ways to leave behind the current system where too often children’s legal needs go unmet.“After three years of extensive study, recommendations for a comprehensive model of representation for children — which I predict will become a model for the nation — have now been published.” President’s Award of Merit to Adele I. Stone, chair, Ethics 2000 Review Panel, member and past chair, Professional Ethics Committee. “In recognition of your meritorious leadership as Chair of the Ethics 2000 Review Panel, created for the analysis and comparison of Florida’s Rules of Professional Conduct and proposed changes to ABA model rules — a huge task completed in a short amount of time — and in appreciation for your dedicated efforts resulting in the issuance of formal ethics advisory opinions on law practice over the Internet and in trust accounts, and for your generous sharing of expertise in a seminar on current ethics issues.”Russell said: “Adele has been extensively involved in revising the Procedures for Ruling on Questions of Ethics while leading The Florida Bar’s Ethics 2000 Review Panel, which made recommendations to the Board of Governors after doing an in-depth analysis and comparison between Florida’s Rules and proposed changes to the ABA model rules by the ABA Ethics Commission 2000.“Adele also currently chairs the Special Committee on Unbundled Legal Services.” President’s Award of Merit to Michael P. McMahon, chair, The Florida Bar Special Commission on Insurance Practices II, 2001-2002. “For extraordinary service and leadership in the study of policyholder and representation by insurance company staff attorneys in Florida and in identifying the potential ethics dilemmas and the responsibilities for these members of the Bar. As a result of the diligent and laborious efforts of your committee, The Florida Bar Board of Governors will file recommended rule changes with the Florida Supreme Court in an effort to benefit all lawyers and citizens of this state. You are a credit to our profession.”Said Russell: “Mike was instrumental in leading the commission in its study of the practices of property and casualty underwriters in using insurance company staff attorneys to represent policyholders and identifying where staff attorneys who represent policyholders need ethical guidance.“Mike worked extremely hard to keep the commission on track and to build consensus with regard to the commission’s recommendations. He drafted large portions of the report and redrafted it, when necessary.” President’s Award of Merit to First District Court of Appeal Judge William A. Van Nortwick, Jr., chair, steering committee of “Access to Justice: It Affects Us All,” August 25, 2001. “In grateful recognition of and with deep appreciation for your diligence and commitment to assembling an outstanding program to afford Bar leaders an opportunity to study and develop recommendations regarding equal access to justice by all. As a result of your efforts and those of the participants, the citizens of Florida will benefit from additional legal aid funding appropriated for the first time by the state, and by a number of other measures that will increase their access to legal assistance, representation, and justice.”Said Russell: “The Florida Bar Board of Governors was very fortunate to have First District Court of Appeal Judge William Van Nortwick chair the steering committee that organized our board retreat, which was also attended by The Florida Bar Young Lawyers Division board, the Foundation board, legal aid organization representatives, and the Bar’s Citizens Forum.“Not only did Judge Van Nortwick lead in all of the planning of the retreat, he also presided over the final session when the breakout groups reported their recommendations. He noted that recommendations seemed to fall into five general areas:• Providing a mechanism for citizens to obtain quick answers to basic legal questions;• Expanding alternative dispute resolution techniques;• Educating the public about resources to solve their legal problems;• Continued study to improve access to the legal system; and• Finding more funding for legal aid in Florida, including looking to the state for assistance.“From the consensus of this group, the Florida Access to Civil Legal Assistance Act was developed and introduced in the 2002 legislature. The bill unanimously passed all committees in both state houses, was unanimously passed by the Florida Senate and was passed by the House, 114 to 1. Prior to this bill’s passage, Florida was one of only 11 states that provided no state funding for civil legal assistance.” President’s Award of Merit to Kirk N. Kirkconnell, chair, All Judicial Nominating Screening Committees; vice chair, Program Evaluation Committee, The Florida Bar Board of Governors, 2001-2002. “For exemplary service to The Florida Bar in developing and implementing uniform procedures for screening JNC applicants, and for providing outstanding leadership in the recruitment and screening of more than 600 applications and selection of 234 attorney nominees to send to the governor for Florida’s 26 JNCs, and in recognition of your simultaneous outstanding service to the ongoing program evaluation process of the Bar over the past year.” S aid Russell: “Florida’s new JNC law was a particular challenge to The Florida Bar. We had to very quickly enact a new process for recruiting, screening, and recommending lawyer members for all 26 judicial nominating commissions. Three names must now be submitted to the governor for each attorney position on each JNC that he is required to appoint from the Bar’s recommendations, which required many, many hours of additional work by all of the screening committees under Kirk’s leadership.“Kirk also served on the Program Evaluation Committee, which prepares in-depth evaluation reports on Bar programs and submits a report to the Board. The committee is also sometimes called on to interpret the Rulings Regulating The Florida Bar, bylaws, or standing board policies, and to review proposed amendments to sections’ bylaws. No small task!” Special Lifetime Achievement Award presented by the Government Lawyers Section to Attorney General Bob Butterworth. Florida Supreme Court Justice Peggy Quince reeled back to 1986 to recall “a younger, dark-haired, smartly-dressed, soft-spoken gentleman who came to the Attorney General’s Office in Tampa and told those of us who worked there that he wanted to succeed Jim Smith as attorney general in Florida and he wanted to become our boss.“The only things we knew about this man were those that we had read in the newspaper. We had read that Bob Butterworth was a former prosecutor, a former judge, and former Broward County sheriff. He seemed qualified to become attorney general,” Justice Quince said.“What we didn’t know about Bob Butterworth was that under that navy-blue suit was a super hero’s cape which read, ‘Super Hero for the People of Florida.’“For that is what he has been to the state. For orchestrating the single state record of $34.5 million from milk companies for bid-rigging to working with Gov. Lawton Chiles to recover $13 billion from the tobacco industry for public health costs associated with smoke-related illnesses, to going after price-gougers after Hurricane Andrew and other storms, Robert Butterworth has proven himself to be a people’s attorney general.“For 16 years, he has advocated for every segment of our state, defending the constitutionality of hate-crime statutes, getting refunds for consumers for deceptive auto-leasing practices, targeting unlawful buyers’ clubs and pyramid schemes, and helping to preserve the environment.. . . You have made us proud to be government lawyers.”When Butterworth came to the podium, he returned the compliment.“When I went to the Tampa office in 1986 asking for their vote, I met a charming young lady there who I just knew someday would be a woman of greatness. And Justice Quince, you are a woman of greatness,” Butterworth said.“I can honestly say I am very proud to be a lawyer. I am very proud of The Florida Bar and the good it has done over the years. I am very proud to be a government lawyer.. . . Really, there is no greater satisfaction that can be had than knowing you had a lasting, positive impact on the lives of people. And you can do that in public service.”center_img Lawyers, judges honored for public servicelast_img read more

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Insurance: Time to rethink your approach?

By on December 18, 2020

first_imgHaving organizational commitment and the right delivery structure can make a world of difference.by: Karen BankstonAlmost every credit union offers some form of insurance coverage for members—from credit life and disability options to a full range of property, casualty, and life insurance products, says Jeffrey Chesky, president/CEO of Insuritas, a CUES Supplier member based in E. Windsor, Conn.However, Chesky suggests that many credit unions may benefit from examining two aspects of their insurance offerings:Organizational commitment to this product line. “Credit union executives get up every day and think intensely about gathering deposits, making loans, and even offering investment services. Many don’t think of insurance products with the same discipline,” he contends.Delivery structure. Traditionally, many credit unions have referred their members to third-party insurance providers, which may raise regulatory hurdles in terms of sharing members’ information, dilute brand equity, and make enrollment more cumbersome, he says.The downside of both these issues is the likelihood of significantly lower revenue production, he cautions.Under the pro column of offering insurance, Chesky lists “a fairly simple licensing process” and no balance sheet or repayment risks. Plus, “it provides a wonderfully elegant experience for the member because so much of the data the credit union has on the member to underwrite loan risk is exactly the same data that an insurance carrier needs to price claims risk,” he says. Both credit unions and insurance carriers base their underwriting on character and collateral. continue reading » 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Netflix’s ‘The Irishman’ has ties to Endicott mobsters

By on December 8, 2020

first_img“While he was here he was listed a repairman for the beverage company which Joe Barbara owned,” said Titti. ENDICOTT (WBNG) — The Irishman, now in select theatres and streaming on Netflix, brings to life a book based largely on mobsters with ties to the Southern Tier. Endicott resident and genealogist Joe Titti is able to trace Buffalino’s ‘business’ back to when he lived in Endicott in the early 1940s. The Martin Scorcese movie is based upon the book ‘I Heard You Paint Houses.’ Local business owner Rob Salamida landed a role as an extra in the movie after applying online. The film tells the story of famous real-life members of the mafia, like Russell Buffalino, whose portrayed by Joe Peschi. “To have that movie that’s based on a book that has a lot to do with our area I think that’s a tribute to it,” said Salamida.last_img read more

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Governor Wolf Reminds Pennsylvanians of Tomorrow’s Open Enrollment Deadline, Warns Consumers About Limited Benefit Plans

By on October 16, 2020

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter January 30, 2017 Governor Wolf Reminds Pennsylvanians of Tomorrow’s Open Enrollment Deadline, Warns Consumers About Limited Benefit Planscenter_img Healthcare,  Press Release,  Public Health Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today reminded Pennsylvania consumers that the open enrollment period for 2017 health insurance coverage available through the federal marketplace at www.Healthcare.gov closes tomorrow, January 31 at 11:59 p.m.. More than 413,000 Pennsylvanians are currently enrolled in plans for 2017.“Tomorrow is the last day to purchase health insurance through the federal marketplace. Though there is certainly some uncertainty about the future of the Affordable Care Act, it is vital to ensure you and your family are covered,” said Governor Tom Wolf.Plans purchased through the close of open enrollment on January 31 will take effect on March 1. If you have coverage effective March 1, you will not be subject to the penalty for not having health insurance coverage. However, if you choose not to enroll and go uninsured for three months or longer, you may be subject to a penalty.Unless you have a life event like moving or loss of a job, among others, you will not qualify for a special enrollment period outside of open enrollment. The open enrollment period is the only time that you will be able to enroll in ACA-compliant health insurance for 2017 through the federal marketplace at www.Healthcare.gov. Plans purchased outside of this period may not meet the coverage requirements established by the ACA and could lead to tax penalties and medical bills for routine, preventive, and emergency services.Health insurance plans for 2017 may be purchased online through www.Healthcare.gov or directly from a licensed insurance company. Plans sold on the federal marketplace meet the coverage standards and consumer protections mandated by the Affordable Care Act, which include coverage for pre-existing conditions, free preventive care, and coverage for other essential health benefits. If you buy directly from an insurance company, make sure that the coverage is ACA-compliant.“I strongly urge consumers to take great care when shopping for health insurance. Some websites and plans contain misleading information and may claim to offer ACA-compliant coverage when they are actually selling limited benefit plans,” said Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller. “If you are not shopping at www.Healthcare.gov, make sure to ask questions and ensure that you are buying an ACA-compliant plan that will provide a 1095-B tax form that shows that you and your family had health insurance that met minimum essential coverage requirements.”There are also resources available to help ease the shopping process. A printable shopper’s guide and videos in English and Spanish are available to help consumers looking for coverage.In addition to these resources, the Insurance Department recently announced a partnership with Consumers’ Checkbook on a website that allows consumers to compare ACA-compliant on- and off-exchange plans available in their area. In some areas, consumers may find that off-exchange plans may be less expensive than on-exchange options; however, only on-exchange plans are eligible for financial assistance. The plan comparison tool, which is available at https://pa.checkbookhealth.org, allows consumers to enter personal data to compare estimated yearly out-of-pocket costs, overall quality of plans, and doctor and prescription drug availability.Help is also available in-person for consumers who need assistance understanding their options. Licensed insurance agents are able to help you find the best plan for your needs and navigators are available to help you understand your options at no cost. Licensed agents can be found here and navigators in your area can be found here.For more information on health insurance or to contact the Insurance Department’s Bureau of Consumer Services, visit www.insurance.pa.gov or call 1-877-881-6388.Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

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Victor Moses delighted to be part of Inter Milan win: We’re a family

By on September 26, 2020

first_img Loading… Promoted ContentBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksThe 18 Most Visited Cities In The WorldWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do ThisA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic BombsWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too Much Victor Moses was delighted to be part of Inter Milan’s 2-0 defeat of Udinese. Inter Milan  The on-loan Chelsea wing-back featured as Romelu Lukaku struck both goals on the day.Advertisementcenter_img Moses said later: “We worked hard, we knew it was a difficult trip. We approached the game very well, we gave everything and in the end it is the victory that came, thanks to great team work. Juventus’ victory could have put pressure on us, but we won by persevering with our work culture. That will help us win many other matches. Read Also:Victor Moses: Proud To Make My Inter Debut “I am settling in very well. I knew (Ashley) Young, Lukaku … Inter is like a family for me. We are close at all times, and this is the most important thing. If we want to win, we have to work hard.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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Police: Alcohol Appears To Be Factor In Brookville Accident

By on September 24, 2020

first_imgBROOKVILLE – The Franklin County Sheriff’s Department says alcohol is believed to be a factor in a single-vehicle accident on U.S. 52 around 2:27 a.m. Sunday.A 2010 Ford Mustang driven by Guy Heath, 79, was traveling west on U.S. 52 going into a curve near the intersection of Little Cedar Road when the he lost control. The vehicle continued into a ditch and flipped completely over at least one time before coming to a rest, investigators said.Heath was rushed to Fayette Regional Hospital for treatment of injuries.The accident remains under investigation as police say alcohol is believed to be a major factor.The Franklin County Sheriff’s Department was assisted on the scene by Brookville Police, Brookville Fire & EMS, Cedar Grove Fire Department and Rescue 24.last_img read more

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Twisters Grounded By Jets

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first_imgThe Oldenburg Academy Twisters were defeated by The Hauser Jets by the score of 3-0 in Varsity Baseball play.H-010 000 2.   3-7-1OA-000 000 0.  0-5-4OA Hitting.Nick Bischoff 1-2, bbMatty Hurm 1-3Tanner Alley 1-3, doubleTyler Hesselbrock 1-3Cory Schuman 1-3Tyler Hogg 0-2 (reached by error) sbOA Pitching.Matty Hurm 6.1 IP, 3 runs, 2 earned, 7 hits, 7 k, 2 bb, hbp.  Loss.Nick Bischoff .2 IP, 0 runs, 0 hits, 1 kVarsity record: 8-5Next game: (5-2) vs. Shawe Memorial (DH) staring at 1 AM.Courtesy of Twisters Coach Doug Behlmer.last_img read more

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