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Alfa Laval signs offshore predictive maintenance agreement

By on May 7, 2021
first_img Alfa Laval has signed offshore predictive maintenance agreement. (Credit: C Morrison from Pixabay) Alfa Laval – a world leader in heat transfer, centrifugal separation and fluid handling – has signed a maintenance agreement with Aker BP, an oil exploration and development company, for Alfa Laval’s Framo seawater lift pumps to off-shore platforms in the North Sea. The order value is directly linked to facility uptime. The agreement has a duration of six years, with an option for an additional six yearsThe maintenance contract is a continuation of a pilot project that started second half of 2018 between Alfa Laval’s Business Unit Pumping Systems, Aker BP and the global AI software company Cognite, and represents a huge step within digitalization and predictive maintenance.Since 2018, large volumes of data have been sent from Aker BP’s offshore platforms to the mainland where they have been interpreted by Cognite’s systems. Based on the results Alfa Laval has been able to evaluate the performance of the equipment and plan effective maintenance. Now with the new contract the cooperation prolongs with a duration of six years, with an option for an additional six years.“In these extraordinary times I am very pleased to announce this interesting order in the connectivity area,” says Sameer Kalra, President of the Marine Division. “The system allows us to use real time data to monitor our offshore equipment `on land’. Thereby we not only can predict and plan effective maintenance and minimize the risk of downtime, but also analyze the design and operating profile, to the benefit of our customer.” Source: Company Press Release The maintenance contract is a continuation of a pilot project that started second half of 2018last_img

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In my world – the craft baker

By on April 21, 2021

first_imgTom Herbert is a fifth-generation baker and director of Hobbs House Bakery, a multi-award-winning craft bakery, based in GloucestershireI’ve been thinking about how to get even more customers. I’m not a fan of advertising in the conventional way how many Chelsea buns would I have to sell to cover the cost? So, feeding the word-of-mouth, promotion notion, I need to cultivate an atmosphere and bakery offering conducive to encouraging great word-of-mouth.And what has got me stoked is thinking about my customers in a fresh way, and goading them into one of four categories. The first horde is ’strangers’ people who are in the shop for the first time and don’t know anything about us. Then there are ’acquaintances’ people we recognise, who know what they want and expect from us. ’Friends’ are a group of regulars we know well and ’fans’ are the special people who love what we do and are responsible for a heck of a lot of great word-of-mouth.And we’ve divvied them all up to see what we’re dealing with. This was very simple, only took a week and was totally worth it, because it not only highlighted just how many strangers we’ve been serving but, crucially, it is the first small step towards a more intentional interaction with customers.I’ve been aware of the difference in serving styles in my shops and, because I have allowed it, they vary wildly. Some people serve incredibly well and, of course, it’s possible to sell badly. But often, serving means standing in a display of products and notices, waiting to respond to the customer in a reactive way. This is fine with regulars, but can seem stand-offish to strangers and, worse, makes our wide range of products seem daunting. So we have a plan to help us recognise strangers and, using initiatives, incentives and impassioned training, we aim to entice more people to be our fans. First, we are looking at what we are saying and conveying on the outside, working our way towards the intentions of every interaction with a customer.This fresh approach has given me a clarity to prioritise activities and, so far, has resulted in funky new loyalty cards, a shiny paint job on the shop fronts, the aforementioned impassioned product training and using fresh baked smells to sell. It has lent a rejuvenated vigour to sampling surely the easiest, sure-fire way to shine a light on a product and sell it.To this end, we have also trialled a host of new sampling platforms, with a pink bird-table grabbing the most attention from passers-by, open to a quick peck of some tasty baked morsel. Simply asking “Madam/Sir, can I tempt you to a soldier?” works a treat if asked with a twinkle in the eye.We’ll beaver the autumn away, and if the shocking pink bird-table works well to engage strangers, then by Christmas, my wish to Father Christmas is that they’ll be fans.last_img read more

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Press release: Recruitment Campaigns open for Psychiatrist and retired Judicial Parole Board members

By on April 20, 2021

first_imgThe Centre for Public Appointments has today opened recruitment campaigns for both Psychiatrist and retired Judicial Parole Board members.Martin Jones, CEO of the Parole Board, said:“We are very happy to support these recruitment campaigns.“It is an important and engaging role to be appointed as a Parole Board member, where protection of the public is the priority, and we welcome applicants who have the skills and experience to rise to that challenge.”The key task of all members of the Parole Board is to make rigorous, fair and timely risk assessments about individual cases which have the primary aim of protecting the public.These are routine recruitment campaigns to fill positions that will be vacated by a number of current Parole Board members who are near the end of their tenure. There is the potential for up to 20 appointments per campaign.The appointment will run for 5 years with the possibility of reappointment for a further term subject to satisfactory appraisal and at the discretion of Ministers.The deadline for applications is 12:00 on 21 May 2018. Go to the Centre for Public Appointments website for eligibility criteria, job specifications, and how to apply: Psychiatrist Memberscenter_img Retired Judicial Memberslast_img read more

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Listen To Tracks From Bob Dylan’s New Box Set Of Live Recordings From 1966

By on March 2, 2021

first_imgRecent Nobel Prize winner Bob Dylan is releasing a box set of live recordings from next Friday, and now you can listen to several tracks from the collection. The album, called “Bob Dylan: The 1966 Live Recordings”, were recorded a mere one year after Dylan “went electric”, and showcase the singer/songwriter and his compatriots in The Hawks (later known as The Band) taking folk music and turning it on its head while on a tour that criss-crossed the world. The box set is a whopping 36-discs long, so get ready to listen to hours and hours of classic live Bob Dylan material.Below, take a listen to a selection of fifteen tracks from the huge box set, courtesy of NPR’s “First Listen” series.last_img read more

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Umphrey’s McGee Welcomes Brass Band, Debuts Original & ‘Chariots Of Fire’ Theme [Video]

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first_imgOn Friday, Umphrey’s McGee took to Cincinnati, Ohio, kicking off a two-night run at the Taft Theatre. The energy of the show was particularly triumphant, given that the band’s highly anticipated new album, it’s not us, had finally been released to the public earlier that day. During the performance, the group welcomed brass band The Cincy Brass to join them on two tunes to close out their first set, including their debut cover of the theme of the 1981 movie, Chariots Of Fire, written by Greek composer Vangelis. The Cincy Brass joined the group for the final two songs of set one: first, the Chariots Of Fire theme followed by the group’s own “Partyin’ Peeps”. Following the debut Vangelis cover, the group landed in “Partyin’ Peeps”, with Umphrey’s giving the full brass band time to show off their skills during an extended jam based around the traditional number, “When The Saints Go Marching In”. Another highlight of the set was Umphrey’s rendition of The Beatles’ “Flying”, marking the first time the song had been played since November 7th, 2014 and ending a gap of 295 shows.“Hangover” > “Chariots Of Fire” > “Partyin’ Peeps”[Video: iccuspunk]The six-song second set allowed the band to really expand upon their jams with a couple of relatively rare songs and the debut of a new song off it’s not us composing set two. “Amble On” was played for the 10th time ever since its debut in Chicago in 2013, reappearing for the first time since March of 2016. The tune also contained a jam built around Radiohead’s “Everything In Its Right Place”—while Umphrey’s hasn’t formally covered the Radiohead song in full, previously Joel Cummins has played the number during his own solo piano sets.Watch Joel Cummins Of Umphrey’s McGee’s Gorgeous Piano Rendition Of A Radiohead ClassicUmphrey’s also dusted off their take on the Allman Brothers Band’s classic hit “Jessica”—a cover that they performed regularly from 1998 to 2001 but that has fallen out of their regular rotation in the years since—after almost exactly a year since it was last played during a performance in New Haven. However, given that the band’s eleventh album had been released earlier in the day, the group set aside time during the tail-end of set two to show some love to their new release, offering up their debut rendition of “Whistle Kids” before closing out the set with their well-loved original “Pay The Snucka”. The band closed the night out in full with a two-song encore of “Orfeo” into “All In Time”.“Orfeo” > “All In Time”[Video: iccuspunk]Setlist: Umphrey’s McGee | Taft Theatre | Cincinnati, OH | 1/12/2018Set 1: Bathing Digits > Bad Friday, Example 1 > Flying [1]> Example 1, Plunger > Anchor Drops, Search 4, Hangover > Chariots of Fire [2] > Partyin’ Peeps [3]Set 2: All In Time > Amble On [4] > 2×2, Jessica, Whistle Kids [5], Pay the SnuckaEncore: Orfeo > All In Time[1] last time played, 2014.11.07 (295 shows) | [2] debut, Vangelis; with The Cincy Brass on horns and percussion | [3] with The Cincy Brass on horns and percussion; with When the Saints Go Marching In (trad.) jam | [4] with Everything In Its Right Place (Radiohead) jam | [5] debut, originallast_img read more

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Trey Anastasio Band Keyboardist Ray Paczkowski Undergoes Surgery For Brain Tumor

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first_imgTrey Anastasio Band’s Ray Paczkowski underwent surgery on Friday after doctors discovered that he was suffering from a brain tumor. The keyboardist, who also comprises one half of Soul Monde (with TAB drummer Russ Lawton), is currently in the hospital recovering.As Trey Anastasio’s Monday, March 19th post reads:Hi friends,After a few months of experiencing headaches and nausea, Ray ended up in the emergency room not long ago. It was discovered that he had a brain tumor.He went into surgery on Friday and is expected to make a full recovery. His family is with him, and I was able to visit with him last week. He was in good spirits, despite the situation.We are all hoping, praying and sending him mountains of love and best wishes. We love you Ray! Get well soon!!#loveforthemilkmanPaczkowski—affectionately known as “The Milkman” on account of the 10+ years he spent working on a dairy farm—began touring with Trey Anastasio Band in 2001. Since then, he’s contributed his keys to a variety of Anastasio projects like The Octet, The Dectet, and Dave Matthews & Friends.Paczkowski’s diagnosis and surgery came in the midst of an ongoing Soul Monde tour, which was scheduled to bring him and Lawton around much of the Northeast in March. Earlier this month, the pair postponed their Rochester and Syracuse shows due to illness, and it’s fair to assume that their March 22nd show in Brooklyn and their March 24th show in Hartford, CT will not be taking place. Additionally, there is currently no word on whether or not Paczkowski will be joining Trey Anastasio Band when they embark on their spring tour in mid-April.We wish Ray Paczkowski all the best in his recovery and can’t wait to see him onstage once again when he’s healthy and ready to perform.last_img read more

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Charlotte ferry resumes service, no longer free

By on January 1, 2021

first_imgThe Lake Champlain Transportation Company (LCT) today resumed ferry service at the Essex-Charlotte crossing.  The ferry will operate Monday through Friday until April 5, at which point service will be expanded to seven days per week.  The ferry begins service from Vermont at 7 a.m. and from New York at 7:30 am each day.  As has been the standard practice, the LCT charges for use of their privately-owned ferry. Their current rates start at $9.50 per vehicle for a one-way trip.For more detailed schedule and rate information, visit the Lake Champlain Transportation Company web site at  http://www.ferries.com/temporary_schedule.asp(link is external) .  Year-round temporary ferry service will continue to operate 24 hours a day, free of charge to travelers between Crown Point, NY, and Chimney Point, VT during the time it takes for a new Lake Champlain Bridge to be built and to open.As always, please visit the website https://www.nysdot.gov/lakechamplainbridge(link is external) or www.ferries.com(link is external) ( http://www.ferries.com/(link is external) )for the most current information.Source: VTrans. 3.23.2010last_img read more

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Contactless payments at a tipping point?

By on December 17, 2020

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr A pandemic of global proportions may be pushing contactless card adoption to new heights, and soon.The Futurist Groupthink firm has just issued a report on survey findings that the coronavirus outbreak had sharply increased U.S. consumers’ perceived importance of contactless payments.And that was as of March 3, the report notes, the same day the World Health Organization advised consumers to quit using cashbecause of the ability of paper to carry the deadly virus.The Futurist Group’s survey of 3,187 structured product reviews on the perceived importance of contactless functionality in evaluating a credit card offer found that 38% of consumers considered it “table stakes”, a 26.6% jump from before the virus hit. continue reading »last_img read more

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2006 SUMMIT COVERAGE: Business leaders urged to plan for severe flu pandemic

By on November 18, 2020

first_img “All of us now depend on imported products, and all of that depends on the free movement of people and goods across national borders,” Cooper said. Travel now accounts for 10% of the world’s gross economic activity and 8% of jobs, she added. Parallels between 1918 virus and H5N1Osterholm sought to background the audience on the science of pandemics in an hour-long talk he called “Influenza 101.” A major theme was that recent research has uncovered chilling similarities between the H5N1 avian influenza virus now circulating in Asia and the H1N1 flu virus that took the world by storm in 1918. In a question period later, Falvey was asked how aware the business world is about the pandemic threat. “I don’t think everyone is getting it, but companies that provide pandemic-related products and services are,” she said. “There’s lots of movement at the highest levels in America to plan for this.” About 300 people, mostly business officials, are attending the 2-day meeting, called Business Planning for Pandemic Influenza: A National Summit, at the Minneapolis Convention Center. The meeting is sponsored by CIDRAP and the US and Minnesota Chambers of Commerce. Among the “immediate losers” in a pandemic would be tourism, transportation, the hospitality industry, life and health insurers, and the entertainment industry, Cooper said. Major economic impact predictedEconomic strategist Dr. Sherry Cooper painted a gloomy picture of the potential economic effects of a pandemic on today’s densely interwoven world. “I think it comes down to the concepts in the law of foreseeability and reasonable response to foreseeable risks,” she concluded. She advised businesses to expect absenteeism rates of about 30% at the peak of a pandemic, along with “months of slowdown.” Researchers recently have concluded that the 1918 virus jumped directly from birds to humans, which bears comparison with the way the H5N1 avian virus is infecting some humans, though it has not spread from person to person. Further, certain mutations seen in the 1918 virus have also been found in H5N1 viruses, Osterholm said. The good news in all this gloom is that “98% of the population will survive,” Cooper said. “It’s not the end of the world.” Leavitt sounded themes that he has used repeatedly in state meetings on pandemic preparedness around the country, warning that every business, government agency, community, school, organization, and household should develop and test a pandemic preparedness plan. She said the pandemic threat poses a dilemma for preparedness advocates in business. “Pre-pandemic we can sound alarmist, yet post-pandemic we can look as if we didn’t do enough,” she said. The foreseeable consequences of a pandemic, she said, include economic losses, supply-chain disruptions, employee absenteeism, quarantines and travel restrictions, an increase in demand for health care, and a decline in tourism. The flu drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu) also has its limitations, he said. “The way we use Tamiflu now may not work for H5N1—it’s likely to be needed at a much higher dosage for a much longer time period.” Utility service could be disrupted. “Imagine no waste management, no clean water, no electricity—not just for a couple of days, but perhaps for weeks,” she said. Fuel shortages, consumer hoarding of things like bottled water, shortages of medical supplies, and other difficulties would make matters worse. Most juries in liability suits understand that accidents happen and human errors occur, Falvey said. “What juries don’t forgive is a failure to assess, a failure to act, to commit money and resources to deal with a problem,” and to involve top management in that effort, she said. For example, Falvey said she represented a refinery operator in Belize that worked for years to prevent an explosion. The company had a computerized alarm system, and officials worked with neighborhood groups and local doctors to prepare them to respond. When the company landed in court, Falvey reported, “What happened was that the jurors respected the process of planning and due diligence. . . . They didn’t penalize the company for a failed alarm system, because there was a documented record of monthly tests. That kind of evidence of planning and proactive efforts at mitigation and relief helps limit your liability.” Cooper, executive vice president of BMO Financial Group in Toronto, said the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) outbreak in Toronto hinted at the possible impact of a pandemic. The virus infected only 252 people and caused 44 deaths in the city, but that was enough to trigger the quarantine of 15,000 people. Hospitals filled up and had to stop all nonessential services, while the World Health Organization warned against traveling to Toronto, causing tourism to collapse. She also advised the audience to educate their employees on pandemic-related risks and on company policies. “Planning will lead to a much calmer environment,” she concluded. “Let’s hope these plans won’t be put to use any time soon.” “Jurors want to know that there was an adequate planning process and that all possibilities were considered, and they were balanced,” she said. Careful risk assessment urged Attorney Cheryl Falvey advised business leaders to carefully assess the risks a flu pandemic would pose and then take documented steps to limit them. Falvey is a partner with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer and Field LLP in Washington, DC. Feb 14, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Speakers at a national conference in Minneapolis today sought to impress business leaders with the potentially disastrous effects of an influenza pandemic without scaring them into thinking that preparing for one is futile. “We can’t hope our way out of this, and we can’t just sit and say, ‘Woe is me.’ Comprehensive and serious planning is not optional,” said Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of the CIDRAP Web site. Falvey invited business people to imagine what kind of lawsuit they could face in the aftermath of a pandemic. Cooper spoke of the “blurring” of national economic boundaries in a world of multinational corporations, global travel, and international supply chains focused on “just-in-time” delivery of parts and products. In opening the session, US Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt said the Hurricane Katrina disaster taught the lesson that “the unthinkable happens, and we need to be thinking about the unthinkable.” He warned that modern medicine won’t offer a great deal of protection in the first several months of a pandemic flu, if ever. Given the time it takes to develop and produce a vaccine for a new flu strain, “Don’t count on a vaccine to get us out of this, at least in the first stage,” he said. In such a world, a severe pandemic would mean a sharp economic downturn, Cooper said. “It is our rough estimate that . . . the global economy would lose roughly six percentage points worth of growth in a 3-month period. It would mean the economy would decline at a 2% annual rate.” The US economy would take a $670 billion hit, she estimated. He recounted watching figure skater Sarah Hughes turn in the performance of her life in the 2002 Winter Olympic games in Salt Lake City, when he was governor of Utah, and said that the pandemic threat should elicit a comparable preparedness effort. “We as a public health community and as a business community need to skate the performance of our lives,” he said. The meeting brought predictions that a major pandemic would put the world economy into reverse and could kill more people than the pandemic of 1918, in which an estimated 50 million to 100 million died. But speakers also said that even in such a disaster, 98% of people would survive, and preparation for “foreseeable risks” will help businesses weather the storm with less damage and legal liability. Despite the precautions, the feared explosion finally occurred—and the computerized alarm system failed in the event, she said. “You need to develop a record to show that management has met its obligations to its various constituencies,” such as customers, employees, shareholders, subsidiaries, and the community, she said. Echoing a point made by Cooper, Falvey urged businesses to make sure they have sick leave and medical policies that don’t discourage workers from staying home when sick. “I can’t come to any other conclusion than that H5N1 and the 1918 H1N1 [viruses] are kissing cousins of the highest order,” he said. Osterholm was asked if he would advise people to stockpile oseltamivir. In reply, he admitted that he has stockpiled some himself, as have colleagues who have been known to counsel the opposite. But he also said it’s essential to make sure there are adequate supplies of antivirals and other medical products for healthcare workers and first responders.last_img read more

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Inner City

By on October 20, 2020

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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