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Over there, over here

By on March 1, 2021

first_imgBefore they were Harvard, they were military.As many as 150 students across the University have seen combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. They have real-world stories to tell and pragmatic perspectives to contribute to academia. For them, America’s long-running wars are more than the stuff of newspaper headlines, network video, or armchair arguments. They are crucibles of experience that are, were, and always will be vivid and real.Interviews with more than two dozen of these veterans suggest that these wars have brought to Harvard combat soldiers, airmen, and Marines who have high levels of discipline, judgment, maturity, and leadership.Most of these student veterans are in three graduate programs, as approximate numbers show: business (70), government (50), and law (15). Two Harvard College undergraduates served in Iraq, both in the Marines. A few others are students at the Harvard Extension School.Joshua Miles, A.L.B. ’10, took his first Harvard course online while running a war zone communications shack in Iraq. To study, he sat outside on a concrete pad littered with machine-gun shells.Students who are veterans say they bring a unique perspective to Harvard. Some of it is academic, and some emotional.When it comes to classes about history, foreign policy, or national security, “We have specific, formal experience in these two major wars,” said Christopher Cannon, M.P.A. ’11, a Harvard Kennedy School student who served tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. He said veterans contribute a hard-won pragmatism, because of “the judgments we all had to make.”Often those judgments had to be fast and immediate, and could have fatal consequences. Decision-making had to be pragmatic and ethical at the same time, with a built-in awareness that people would be affected by the outcome.“We talk a lot of theory here,” said Hagan Scotten, 34, a third-year student at Harvard Law School who had three combat tours in Iraq as a U.S. Army Special Forces officer. “You realize there’s a lot more out there.”When student veterans talk about Iraq and Afghanistan, they begin with a powerful fact: They were there, and their memories are fresh.Sean Barney, M.P.A. ’11, will graduate from Yale Law School next year, as well. For two months in 2006, he was a Marine rifleman patrolling the narrow alleys and crooked, crowded streets of Fallujah, Iraq.On May 12 of that year, a sniper shot him in the neck. The bullet severed his carotid artery. Stunned, his head buzzing, Barney ran for cover before collapsing. He awoke two days later in a hospital in Washington, D.C., another miracle of modern combat medicine.David Dixon, Ed.M. ’11, a captain still on active duty in the Marines, flew 250 combat missions in Iraq, piloting an AH-1W Super Cobra attack helicopter bristling with missiles and rocket pods. A thousand feet in the air, he recalled, western Anbar Province looked as barren and empty as an ocean. On the ground, the region was alternately frigid and roasting, a weather-whipped cauldron of sudden sandstorms, lightning, and torrential rains.Jared Esselman, M.P.P. ’11, traveled the world in the Air Force, often in C-17 transport aircraft, where he was a loadmaster. (He managed aircraft from the pilot’s seat to the plane’s tail, with responsibilities for passengers, fuel, hydraulics, center-of-gravity cargo, and combat off-loading.)Esselman was in Iraq in March 2003 in the earliest days of the shooting war. His aircraft was the second C-17 to land in Baghdad, where resistance remained stiff. Bombs flashed and blue-tailed missiles streaked past. “Red tracers from anti-aircraft fire [were] just littering the sky,” he said. “It looked like lightning.” He went on to fly nearly 300 combat sorties.One feature of combat is that those who survive “bring a sense of caring about other people,” said Esselman, whose pre-service experience included herding cattle and working in a factory. “It’s hard for veterans to switch off that mode. It’s genuine caring.” Back home, “That translates over some to the classroom. You care about your classmates,” he said, “because you did the same thing on the battlefield.”Several veterans said they contribute something else to Harvard: a kind of diversity that widens the idea of combining different, even divergent, backgrounds and opinions to multiply the strength of an institution.“Harvard preaches diversity,” generally applying the concept to race, gender, or ethnicity, said Dixon, who read the Bible every day while overseas. “Diversity of experience and diversity of insight is just as, if not more, important.”He recalled a recent survey of political beliefs in one of his classes. Out of 30 students, there was one communist and one conservative Republican, said Dixon, who did the Texas two-step with Jessica Simpson on the country dance team in high school. The rest identified as Democrats. (He said he was one of the two outliers, and invited a guess as to which.)Having veterans in the classroom is also important because of the gravity of America’s current wars, said Dixon, who echoed comments from other Harvard veterans. After all, “Many students are the future leaders of the country,” he said, “and I think it is paramount that they personally know who is fighting for their freedoms.”Harvard’s veterans also include women, who attest to gender diversity in the armed forces. (About a fifth of those in the U.S. armed services are women.) Tammy Brignoli, M.P.A. ’10, a major whose next post will be at the Pentagon, is only 38, but already has 21 years in the Army, counting time in the Reserves. She joined at 17, in the summer before her senior year in high school in Texas.As an officer in airborne units, Brignoli served in Iraq and Afghanistan in capacities directly supporting combat units. “I’m really glad the military has changed the way it has,” said the mother of three, whose youngest son’s name is Valor. “It allows women to make a name for themselves.” At Harvard, she said, “I’m building bridges.”Several veterans said one insight they brought with them to campus was that high test scores and book learning do not necessarily equate to everyday competence. They have seen that intelligence takes many forms.“I appreciate other people’s beliefs and norms and values,” Jose Rios, Ed.M. ’10, said of the military’s democratizing effect. When he arrived at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education, he brought along a respect for other cultures, opinions, and backgrounds that he gained in the Marine Corps, including on two tours in Iraq with an aviation unit.The University’s veterans say combat also instills a perspective beyond academics or social settings. It sharpens the sense of what matters, and in what order.Aaron Scheinberg, M.P.A./ID ’11, who is working on a joint degree, including business at Columbia University, spent a year as an Army officer patrolling Iraq’s Sunni Triangle. He finds that he doesn’t get annoyed anymore when standing in line for, say, coffee. That likely has something to do with the dozen times his combat vehicles were hit by IEDs (improvised explosive devices). To this day he remembers the bright flash, the choking dust, and the chemical taste.“You catch yourself,” said Scheinberg, an Arabic-speaking graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point who appreciates where he is now. “Look, this is not a bad deal. You can step back and say: We’re at Harvard, the best school in the world.”Yes, it can be a struggle to pull an all-nighter to get ready for a final exam, said Thomas Rubel ’13, a 23-year-old freshman who served two combat tours in Iraq with the Marines. But then along comes perspective. “I’m warm,” he said. “No one is shooting at me.”Erik Malmstrom, M.P.P./M.B.A. ’12, who blogs about his wartime experiences for the New York Times, embraces the same kind of perspective. He was an Army platoon leader in northeast Afghanistan’s remote and rugged Waigul Valley, where in a year he lost six comrades. The pain still glitters in his eyes.“The main thing, and the most important thing: We bring a dose of reality,” said Malmstrom. “We’re educating people in many ways.”Jake Cusack, M.P.P./M.B.A. ’12, who was a Marine sniper platoon commander in Iraq, said that veterans educate those around them, in part by demonstrating the power of context. To get results, he said, theory often must be strained through reality.“When you talk in a classroom about executing ‘comprehensive counterinsurgency policies’ in Afghanistan or Iraq, it’s one thing to use those words and to imagine what they might be in an academic setting,” Cusack said. “But it’s another to be able to execute those policies when you’re tired, it’s 110 degrees, and you’re angry because one of your friends was wounded or killed the day before.”It’s important to bring context to the classroom, agreed Malmstrom, but it’s also important to bring a sense of humility. Seeing, up close, the complexities of executing policy, he said, “makes me much more thoughtful and mature about how I view military power.”Cusack added a caveat, mentioning another form of humility. Veterans are not the only ones at Harvard with the real-world perspective gained from living in austere conditions and dangerous places. Students who have had field experience with nongovernmental organizations or the Peace Corps, for instance, often have gotten the same jolt from reality, he said.Melissa Hammerle, M.B.A. ’10, was an Army officer in Baghdad’s Green Zone, where periodic mortar rounds would loop in and explode. She remembers the New Year’s Eve leading into 2006, when she was on a night convoy in the Sunni Triangle. “The fireworks,” she said, “were real.”Hammerle said that many classmates have had little involvement with the military, and that some have never met anyone in the service — a disconnect that concerns many veterans. In a military system without a draft, said Malmstrom, many Americans have been generally unaffected by the wars that have torn through nearly a decade.At Harvard, which has deep historical connections to the military, that disconnect is fairly recent.During the Revolutionary War, Gen. George Washington garrisoned troops in Harvard Yard, and Holden Chapel became a storehouse for arms. During the Civil War, more than 1,500 Harvard students left to serve — 257 of them for the Confederacy. During World War I, students drilled with rifles on campus. Decades later, the University contributed to atomic bomb research.The Vietnam War strained the College’s centuries-long military affiliations, and the current military policy toward gay members of the armed forces has been criticized as being at odds with the University’s antidiscrimination policies.Still, there are signs that Harvard and the military are renewing some old ties.Last year at Commencement, President Drew Faust presided over the Reserve Officers Training Corps’ commissioning ceremony. Gen. David Petraeus, former commander of coalition forces in Iraq and architect of the troop surge there, was the guest of honor.During the ceremony, Faust announced that Harvard College, all of Harvard’s graduate and professional schools, and the Harvard Extension School will help to pay tuition costs for veterans by participating in the new federal Yellow Ribbon GI Education Enhancement Program. She called the program, which is aiding about 120 students this year, “an opportunity for us to show our gratitude to the citizen-soldiers who have given so much for our nation.”And on Veterans Day last fall, Faust spoke during a ceremony at the Memorial Church honoring Harvard’s 16 Medal of Honor recipients. She cited the military’s “courage, character, and … profound sense of obligation to service and citizenship.” Delivering the keynote address was Gen. George W. Casey Jr., chief of staff of the U.S. Army, whose father, Gen. George William Casey ’45, died in Vietnam.The pews were crowded with uniformed veterans, including Seth Moulton ’01, M.P.A./M.B.A. ’11, who completed four tours in Iraq. “There’s a war still going on in America, yet people … are disconnected from it,” he said later. “We offer a connection.”The military “is a proud community, and one that would like to retain its place at Harvard,” said Barney, the Marine wounded in Fallujah, who sees hope in the recent interactions. Something important is developing, he said — the concept of “renewing the idea of military service as public service.”last_img read more

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[The Source Podcast] Dell Technologies World Preview

By on February 27, 2021

first_imgDell Technologies World is NEXT WEEK!Dell Technologies World is for technologists, thought leaders and executives ready to transform their careers and organizations. Find topics at all levels of technical competency, from application development to infrastructure modernization; from innovation strategy to cloud and security. Tap into the expertise of Dell Technologies engineers, trailblazers and architects who make transformation real every day.With so much happening, where do you start?  I talked to Greg McCarthy (@GMcCarthy24) from the Dell Social Team to get the details on the action-packed conference.  Get all the details and the full agenda at www.DellTechnologiesWorld.comGet Dell EMC The Source app in the Apple App Store or Google Play, and Subscribe to the podcast: iTunes, Stitcher Radio or Google Play.Dell EMC The Source Podcast is hosted by Sam Marraccini (@SamMarraccini)last_img read more

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Hot Shot! Matthew Broderick Reunites with Kelli O’Hara Backstage at Bridges

By on January 18, 2021

first_imgA very special visitor traveled “A Million Miles” to see The Bridges of Madison County on April 15: Tony winner Matthew Broderick! The Tony winner played a wealthy playboy opposite Kelli O’Hara as a tomboy bootlegger in Broadway’s Nice Work If You Can Get It, so Broderick was thrilled to see his former co-star back on the boards in a new musical! After the show, O’Hara and her new co-star Steven Pasquale caught up with the Producers alum and gave him a backstage tour. Check out this Hot Shot of the talented duo together again, then see The Bridges of Madison County at the Schoenfeld Theatre! Related Shows View Comments The Bridges of Madison County Kelli O’Hara Matthew Broderick Star Files Show Closed This production ended its run on May 18, 2014 Steven Pasqualelast_img read more

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Mark Rylance-Led Farinelli and the King Sets West End Dates & Cast

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first_img View Comments We’re keeping a close eye on this one—it has Broadway written all over it. Dates and full casting have been announced for the previously reported West End production of the Mark Rylance-led Farinelli and the King. The entire company will transfer with the show from Shakespeare’s Globe, including the three-time Tony winner as King Philippe V of Spain, along with Sam Crane playing the acting role of Farinelli and the singing role shared by Iestyn Davies and Rupert Enticknap. The production will play a limited engagement September 14 through December 5 and officially open on September 29 at the Duke of York’s Theatre.The cast will also feature Huss Garbiya as Doctor Jose Cervi, Melody Grove as Isabella Farnese, Colin Hurley as Metastasio and Edward Peel as De la Cuadra.Directed by John Dove and designed by Jonathan Fensom, Claire van Kampen’s new play is set in eighteenth-century Spain and show tells the true story of Farinelli, once the world’s most famous castrato and one of the greatest celebrities of his time, and his decision to trade fame and fortune in the opera-houses of Europe for a life of servitude at the court of King Philippe V. The new play explores the dynamics between Farinelli and the royal couple, featuring many of the exquisite arias first sung by Farinelli in the 1730’s.last_img read more

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Alleged Colombian Drug Trafficker Extradited to U.S.

By on December 20, 2020

first_img According to U.S. authorities, Linares Castillo’s network has produced and trafficked thousands of kilos of cocaine by air, mainly from the Venezuelan state of Apure, arriving in Central America and México, where the recipients are criminal organizations involved with the Mexican drug cartels of Sinaloa and Los Zetas, according to the U.S. Treasury Department. Linares Castillo, age 47, is considered by the U.S. Department of Justice as one of the major drug traffickers in the world, wanted by the United States. Last February, the United States announced sanctions against Linares Castillo, seizing his assets in the U.S. and prohibiting him from conducting any financial activity. Alleged Colombian drug trafficker José Linares Castillo was extradited to the United States, where he was accused of shipping tons of cocaine into that country, as well as of supporting the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), the Federal Prosecutor’s Office stated on April 26. By Dialogo April 30, 2013center_img “Linares Castillo, arrested in May 2012, arrived at the Southern District of New York on April 25. He was brought before Judge Richard Sullivan on April 26,” the prosecutor of that jurisdiction, Preet Bharara, said in a statement. He faces three charges of conspiracy for “importing cocaine into the United States,” “narco-terrorism” and “providing material support.” Two of the charges carry a maximum penalty of life in prison. In addition to being involved with the FARC guerrillas, his criminal organization has also been linked in the past to Colombian drug leaders such as Daniel “El Loco” Barrera and Pedro Oliveiro Guerrero Castillo.last_img read more

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MMZG # 56: Panel discussion “Marketing and advertising in tourism”

By on November 18, 2020

first_imgMarketing Meet Up Zagreb (MMZG) is a gathering of the largest meetup group in Croatia and marketing enthusiasts in Croatia. And Ilija Brajković, co-owner of the digital agency Kontra, is “to blame” for the whole story and the positive change. Find out more here Online MMZG # 56: Panel discussion “Marketing and advertising in tourism” Panel guests:- Adriano Požarić, TourismInfo- Ema Škabar, ORVAS Yachting- Dalibor Drakulić, Integral Zagreb- Petar Krvarić, Importanne Resort- Ilija Brajković, Kontra, moderator 4. online, and the 56th MMZG deals with the topic of tourism, ie marketing in tourism. The goal is to provide answers to questions about the predictions for the season and mostly deal with communication, advertising and marketing for this year.center_img In the 6 years of Marketing Meet Up Zagreb, the 55th gathering and loud thinking about marketing has been held, and in this extraordinary time where conferences and public gatherings are not allowed in large numbers, MMZG has moved into the virtual world. Some of the topics: – What did communication and advertising look like during the corona?- What to focus on now, what to communicate and sell?- Which channels to use?- What markets are our focus?- Predictions for tourism 2020.last_img read more

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In land of big data, China sets individual privacy rights

By on October 19, 2020

first_imgChina is poised to enshrine individuals’ rights to privacy and personal data for the first time, a symbolic first step as more of the country of 1.4 billion people becomes digitized – and more vulnerable to leaks and hacks.The legislation is part of China’s first civil code, a sweeping package of laws that is being deliberated during the annual meeting of parliament, which began on Friday after a delay of more than two months due to the coronavirus.According to a recent draft, an individual has a right to privacy and to have their personal information protected. Data collectors have a duty to protect an individual’s personal information and cannot obtain, disclose or conduct transactions of such data without consent.The push to shore up data privacy in China is widely seen as an effort to protect and legitimize the country’s fast-growing internet sector and place safeguards on the movement of valuable Chinese data overseas.The legislation will need to be followed by detailed regulation spelling out how those rights will be protected, and this gives no protection from increasingly pervasive surveillance by a government that wields total control over the country’s digital sphere.Nevertheless, lawyers and legal experts say the recognition of digital privacy rights is an important first step allowing individuals who suffer from leaks to seek readdress. “When the law hasn’t set a definition for personal information, then a lot of disputes are very hard to resolve because there’s no way to sue,” said Xu Ke, a professor at the University of International Business and Economics in Beijing.The legislation places China among a minority of countries building legal frameworks governing individual data privacy, although individual protections currently in place are not as strong as Europe’s General Data Protection Regulations, said Chen Lei, a law professor at the City University of Hong Kong.Legal experts say existing Chinese laws do not provide adequate protection for individuals because they don’t impose significant punishment for companies responsible for breaches.Chinese courts also have been inconsistent on privacy cases, which some blamed on inadequate regulations and guidance for a rigid court system that limits judges’ scope to make new interpretations in law.In one high-profile case, a group of 42 people sued Amazon in 2017 for breach of their personal data by scammers.Yanming, one of those who sued the U.S. e-commerce giant, said he fell victim when a person called him with the exact order number for products he purchased. The person said there was a problem and offered a refund, luring Yanming to a phishing website planted within Amazon’s website that siphoned 247,000 yuan ($34,627) from Yanming’s account.Chinese courts have ruled twice against Yanming – who requested his last name be withheld for privacy – and the other plaintiffs, however, stating that a criminal case must take place first before a civil case can start.”The court’s decision is such that companies won’t value personal information protection, or digital safety practices,” said Wang Congwei, the victims’ lawyer.Parliament plans to roll out separate legislation specifically on protection of personal information later this year, and lawyers say Beijing needs to set stronger penalties for breaches or leaks in order to provide effective protection.”[The civil code] will help, whether from the perspective of civil suits, or from the perspective of safeguarding rights for the victim, it’s more clear, and for the courts this is a clearer standard,” said Wang.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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Secure a camping spot for life

By on September 28, 2020

first_imgInside one of the cabins at the Far South Wilderness Camp in TasmaniaMISSED out on a camping spot for Easter? Well you could just buy this deer park and have a place to pitch a tent for every holiday period.Or maybe that holiday park with a wicked water park in Queensland, or eco-wilderness resort in Tasmania. MORE: When it comes to loos, it’s a game of thrones The kids will be entertained for hours!In New South Wales, a 52 hectare camp ground at Nowra could be yours for $4.8 million.That’s plenty of space for the extended family to pitch tents. The property, known as Coolendel, has been owned and operated over the past 30 years by three families. Coolendel is on the Shoalhaven River There is also no mobile phone reception so you can literally switch off from the world. In Tassie, a 15.4 hectare property called The Far South Wilderness Camp is also on the market. Oh dear! Just about every camp site is booked out but this deer park could be yours.There is even some onsite vans and ensuite cabins for the glampers, and a four-bedroom house with a private pool. Footy star’s beach house dream In Queensland, Borumba Deer Park in the Mary Valley near Brisbane has been listed for sale, and comes with 25.99 hectares of land and Yabba Creek frontage, around 25 deer, two pigs, three goats, and plenty of spots to pitch the tent or park the caravan. First the pub … The Dargo River Inn and Tourist Park sits on a 2.43 hectare block, and offers accommodation, powered sites and camping all year round. Campers at Coolendel It has extensive Shoalhaven River frontage, bushwalking tracks, a three bedroom residence, two cabins, a bunkhouse, machinery shed and two amenities blocks, and it is totally ‘off the grid’. Fresh water is sourced from the river and pushed through extensive filtration systems. There is also solar power and gas for the hot water system and electricity. MORE: How to score this landlord’s cruisy rental deal The park has plenty of spaces to pitch a tent — if its not booked out. The eco wilderness camp is south of HobartThere is also a private residence for onsite manager or owner, a recreation/dining hall with fully-equipped commercial kitchen, a reception/office, amenities block, BBQ shelter, storage sheds and a private jetty and pontoon.You get a pub with this tourist park in the foothills of the Victorian High Country. And the kangaroos don’t mind a game of golf.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus13 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market13 hours agoLocated in the North Burnett region, the park has 151 powered sites, 76 unpowered sites, 27 cabins and villas, 2 amenities blocks, 2 camp kitchens, a reception/cafe/conference room, entertainment facilities including an outdoor cinema, swimming pools and a water park. Just don’t forget to pack the thermals!Located 80km south of Hobart, it has two five-room, six-bunk cabins, two double motel-style cabins, a separate lodge that sleeps up to 10 plus sheltered camping areas. When auctions and elections collide It has camp sites and onsite accommodation.If the Big 4 is booked out, you can literally buy this one at Cania. Big 4 Cania Gorge Holiday Park is on the market for $6.2 million, with its current owners keen to retire. … then pitch the tent!Features include a public bar and separate dining area, a large beer garden, four self-contained cabins, one bunk style cabin, a renovated four bedroom, two bathroom plus office residence, 20 powered sites and approximately three acres of unpowered camping area.last_img read more

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Fire Forces Passenger Ship to Change Course to Majorca

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first_imgThe 1995-built passenger vessel Tariq Ibn Ziyad suffered a fire in its cargo hold on November 12, which forced the vessel to divert its heading to Majorca, according to the Ministry of Finance and Public Administrations of Balearic islands.The fire started in the early morning hours while the 5,125 dwt ship was sailing from the French port of Marseille to Algeria and forced the ship to stop at the Port d’Alcudia in North East Majorca.The ferry was transporting some 470 passengers, as well as over 130 crewmembers, 29 of whom were treated for smoke inhalation at the port and three were moved to a hospital with non life-threatening injuries. An unknown number of cars was also being transported aboard the ship, some of which were damaged.AIS data provided by Marine Traffic shows that the vessel is currently moored at the North East Majorca’s port.Another ferry, the 2004-built Tassili II, has been designated to carry the passengers and the cars from the affected vessel to their destination port of Algiers.Relevant authorities have launched an investigation into the cause of the incident.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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Top news of the week May 27-June 1

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first_imgLNG World News Staff Image courtesy of Sempra LNG Bechtel scores $9.5 bln Rio Grande LNG EPC dealUS LNG export project developer NextDecade has signed two contracts with Bechtel for the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) of NextDecade’s Rio Grande LNG project in Brownsville, Texas, totaling $9.565 billion.Inpex, Indonesia make headway on $20 bln Abadi developmentJapan’s exploration and production giant Inpex has made progress on the development of the Masela block in the Arafura Sea that contains the Abadi gas field.Stonepeak to invest $1.3 bln in Calcasieu Pass LNGUS LNG export project developer Venture Global LNG has agreed with Stonepeak Infrastructure Partners for the latter to provide a $1.3 billion equity investment in the 10 million tonnes per annum (MTPA) Calcasieu Pass LNG export facility in Cameron Parish, Louisiana.Sempra ships first Cameron LNG cargoSempra Energy’s Cameron LNG project has shipped the first commissioning cargo of liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the first liquefaction train of the export project in Hackberry, Louisiana.Summit LNG completes first ship-to-ship LNG transfer in BangladeshSummit LNG, a Summit Corporation unit, has successfully completed its first ship-to-ship transfer of liquefied natural gas (LNG) in Bangladesh.last_img read more

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