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Jose Canseco shares out-of-this-world conspiracy theories for your amusement

By on December 20, 2019

first_imgA fine Wednesday morning to you from former Oakland Athletics lightning rod Jose Canseco, who wishes to share a couple of thoughts.Our science is totally irrelevant to aliens— Jose Canseco (@JoseCanseco) January 30, 2019 This is going to rock Bill Nye’s world. But wait, there’s more:Time travel puts 42,651 pounds of pressure on a human skeletal structure…. can you detach the brain from the body and equalize the pressure it could be done— Jose Canseco (@JoseCanseco) January 30, …last_img read more

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Will the Raiders trade down from the No. 4 pick?

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first_imgINDIANAPOLIS — Mike Mayock emphasized multiple times Wednesday that the Raiders have too many holes on their team to put just one or two positions atop their offseason priority list.“We’ve got 10 picks, and we value all of them,” Mayock said. “We need to hit on a high, high percentage. We’ve got more needs than I can even tell you about right now.”Wide receiver, running back, offensive line, possibly tight end, defensive end, linebacker, safety, maybe more.The Raiders’ bevy of needs may lead …last_img read more

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Better luck next time

By on December 19, 2019

first_imgKhanyi MagubaneTwelve-year-old Themba has a dream. He dreams about making it into his school’s football team. It would be his entry into the world of the sport, and lead him to his other dream, to be just like his hero, South African football legend Lucas Radebe.He asks his dad to help him to achieve his dream. Every day they practise in the backyard. His father records football matches and teaches him the finer points of playing the game well. After several weeks of practice, his father is convinced his son is ready for the football trials, where the football coach at his son’s school will pick the team.Themba and his father show up bright and early on a Saturday morning at the school’s football ground, prepared and proud. Other parents are there too, to support their children.The moment of truth arrives. All the hopefuls are put through a series of tests, kicking the ball, sprinting and playing mock matches. The head coach and his assistants watch closely, scribbling in their notebooks. Themba gives it his all. He kicks with all his might, he runs faster than he ever has before. The other boys are just as strong, if not stronger, but he is hopeful. This is after all, his dream.The coach and his helpers then withdraw to confer. Half an hour later they call the boys back to the field. The head coach gives a little speech before announcing the successful candidates.He tells them what a difficult decision it was to pick the final 16 players as all of them had displayed “a great amount of courage and enthusiasm”. But at the end of the day, a choice must be made.As the names of the successful players are called, they step forward. Themba’s heart is beating fast. He glances over to the stands where his father is sitting. Dad gives him the two thumbs up and is beaming from ear to ear.With each name called, Themba is certain the next will be his. Then his excitement starts turning to doubt. Maybe, just maybe, he didn’t cut it. His worst fears are realised when the 16th name is called. An overwhelming mixture of anger and disappointment comes over Themba. This time, he find is difficult to look at his father.His dad is crushed for his son. How could this be? He watched Themba give it his all, he worked so hard, what went wrong? “This is a travesty of justice,” Themba’s father says. He was going to fix this once and for all.He stomps onto the field and heads directly for the head coach. Accustomed to this behaviour from irate parents, the coach is calm. He explains that Themba was not as strong or as fast as the other kids. “Better luck next time,” he says.On the way back home, Themba’s dad tries to encourage his son. He tells him the coach made a wrong decision, that he knows nothing about football. Themba tries to hide his disappointment, but he’s clearly broken.But he is consoled that his father has so much faith in him. Silently, in that moment, he decides that next year he’s going to try again. He is going to make his father, and Lucas Radebe, proud of him.For me, Themba’s story represents the story of Team South Africa at the Beijing Olympics. There is no doubt that this was by far our worst performance, and much has been said about the lack of adequate funding and training. I’ve heard of all and, in essence, I agree.But the brutality of South Africans’ criticism of the 131 sports men and women who entered the Bird’s Nest Stadium at the spectacular opening ceremony leaves me gaping.I imagine them, one after another, losing to stronger, faster and more agile athletes from other parts of the world. And I have to ask, where were the words that every Themba wanted to hear? Who clapped for them when they entered through the arrivals gates at the airport? Told them, “Better luck next time”?This support may have been difficult, given how dismally our athletes were shown up by astonishing record-breakers such as Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt and American swimmer Michael Phelps. They were the glory boys, they broke all the records, and I congratulate them wholeheartedly.What many people don’t know is that a leg injury eliminated Bolt from the first round of the 200m heats at the 2004 Athens Olympics. Four years later he was back, with far better luck: he broke the world record in the same track event, at 19.30 seconds – the fastest time in history.Phelps, whose eight medals are the most ever won at an Olympic tournament, also knows what it feels like to walk away with only a bronze, with nobody noticing.So I feel encouraged that our athletes still have great prospects ahead of them at future Olympic Games. I’m proud of each and every man and woman who qualified for that world stage. I am proud, because representing your country is an honour. I salute them, even with just the one silver medal that long-jumper Khotso Mokoena brought home; I salute each and every one of them. The road leading to the London 2012 Olympics is not that long, and I can’t wait to see Team South Africa make South Africa eat humble pie.Go to the MediaClub weekly columns home pageKhanyi Magubane is a journalist, published poet, radio broadcaster and fiction writer. She writes for MediaClubSouth Africa, and brings with her an eclectic mix of media experience. She’s worked as a radio journalist for stations including Talk Radio &702 and the youth station YFM, where she was also a news anchor. She’s been a contributing features writer in a number of magazines titles including O magazine and Y mag. She’s also a book reviewer and literary essayist, published in the literary journal Wordsetc. Magubane is also a radio presenter at SAfm, where she hosts a Sunday show. She’s currently also in the process of completing the manuscript of her first novel, an extract of which has been published in Wordsetc.last_img read more

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Taking the SA Story to new heights

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first_imgInteresting facts and figures, business opportunities, the heart-stopping action of the 2010 Fifa World Cup … here you’ll find it all. As you discover the people, passions and ideas that shape South Africa, we know you’ll feel inspired. So read, enjoy – and make plans to write your own chapter in theSouth African Story.last_img

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Updated: New MH370 search area not specific enough, says Minister.

By on December 18, 2019

first_imgAustralian Transport Minister Darren Chester has dampened hopes of extending the search for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 to a  new 25,000 sq. km search zone identified by international experts as having a high probability of containing the wreckage.Mr Chester’s view that the new search area is not specific enough puts him at odds with the experts’  conclusion that the location north-east of the existing search zone needs investigating.The expert findings are detailed in  “First Principles Review”,  a report issued on Tuesday by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau detailing the findings of a meeting held in Canberra in early November by parties involved in the search for the missing Boeing 777“The participants of the First Principles Review were in agreement on the need to search an additional area representing approximately 25,000 sq. km,’’  the report concluded.  “Based on the analysis to date, completion of this area would exhaust all prospective areas for the presence of MH370.’’.The disagreement comes as the existing search for MH370,  which disappeared on March 8, 2014, with 239 aboard, is winding down and is expected to conclude early in the new year.The new area identified as a potential crash site adjoins an area searched in 2014 and takes into account additional information from a CSIRO ocean drift study. It is not part of part of the 120,000 sq. km swathe of Indian Ocean swept for more than two years and in which no sign of the aircraft debris field has been found.Mr Chester welcomed the review of what he described as the biggest search in aviation history and one that tested the limits of technology. “The information in the ATSB report, however, does not give a specific location of the missing aircraft,’’ he said.“We are very close to completing the 120,000 square kilometre underwater search area, and we remain hopeful that we will locate the aircraft.“As agreed at the Tripartite Ministers meeting in Malaysia in July we will be suspending the search unless credible evidence is available that identifies the specific location of the aircraft.’’The experts taking part in review concluded the search team was unlikely to have missed the debris in the current search area and there was a high degree of confidence, greater than 95 per cent, in the high-resolution sonar coverage conducted so far.The new area — between latitudes 32.5 degrees south and 36 degrees south —  was based on “comprehensive satellite data analysis and updated with the latest search results and the CSIRO drift analysis,” the report said.It is slightly narrower than the first zone due to revised calculations that the aircraft crashed closer to the seventh arc, the curved line determined by the last satellite handshake between the aircraft and the plane.The analysis of the last two satellite transmissions, the likely position of the aircraft’s flaps when it hit the water and the results of recent end-of-flight simulations indicate it was within 25 nautical miles to the east and west of the arc, rather than the 40nm originally postulated.The three-day First Principles Review was attended by Australian and international experts in data processing, satellite communications, accident investigation, aircraft performance, flight operations, sonar data, acoustic data and oceanography. It aimed to reassess and validate existing evidence and to consider any new analysis that may assist in identifying the location of MH370, which crashed in 2014 while en-route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.A key to the finding was additional information not available when the first search area was defined.More than 20 items of debris have been recovered and identified as likely to be, almost certainly or definitely originating from MH370., including parts the wing. Items have been located along the east and south coast of Africa, the east coast of Madagascar and the Islands of Mauritius and Rodrigues in the Indian Ocean. However, none has been found in Australia.The CSIRO drift study found there was definitely a surface debris field and that the fact that the original sea surface search between March 18 and April 28, 2014, failed to detect wreckage argued that area was not the site of the crash.The drift study identified the new search area as being consistent with the failure to detect debris during the 2014 surface search, the absence of wreckage on the WA coastline as well as the July, 2015, arrival of a flaperon at La Reunion Island and the arrival times of other debris.last_img read more

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Zero-emission vehicles a hit in Durban

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first_img8 December 2011While South Africans will have to wait a while before they can buy an electric vehicle (EV), at least a dozen of the zero-emission cars have been doing the rounds in Durban since the start of the UN climate summit (COP 17).Some COP 17 delegates have been taking advantage of the opportunity to test-drive the Nissan Leaf – “Leading, Environmentally friendly, Affordable, Family car” – which was named World Car of the Year 2011, and the Renault Fluence Z.E.These vehicles are also being used to shuttle people to and from Durban’s International Convention Centre, venue of the climate talks.Taking a test-driveBuaNews found a few minutes to test-drive the vehicles. Initially, looking at a car with a steering wheel on the left hand side brought about some panic, but a few minutes inside and it was all smooth sailing.The cars are easy to drive (automatic), but it takes a bit of time to become acquainted with their technical aspects. Highly advanced features offer the driver detailed maps, information about energy being used, and battery recharging stations.EVs are being sold in Europe, Japan and the US and are expected to be launched in South Africa in a few years’ time.Nissan has announced plans to launch the Nissan Leaf in South Africa in 2013, subject to the successful conclusion of discussions between the government and the motoring industry on the establishment of charging infrastructure and the introduction of customer incentives.Smaller carbon ‘wheelprints’The EVs, which can be charged from purely renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind power, aim to play a critical role in reducing the impact of climate change.The cars’ batteries can be charged at home. Although they’re more expensive in some countries, people who own the cars are assisted by their governments with free parking in busy cities, tax rebates and other incentives.How often one recharges the battery depends on the driver – if the air conditioning and lights are used often, then the batteries would have to be charged accordingly.For music loving South Africans, the good news is that using your radio or CD player takes up minimal energy.The money that is expected to be saved on petrol is another selling point of the cars. They’re a pleasure to drive, knowing that one is not increasing the carbon footprint. It’s an effortless adventure, with no sounds coming from the engine or exhaust pipe.Renault TwizyAt Durban’s Moses Mabhida Stadium, people can also test-drive a Renault Twizy, an easy-to-drive commuter vehicle that can be plugged into many conventional wall sockets.The Twizy, designed to be an antidote to the air and noise pollution plaguing some of the world’s biggest cities, can be a bit strange to drive. If you are not a fan of scooters, this little vehicle may not be for you.“The Renault-Nissan Alliance applauds what South Africa and all the nations represented at COP 17 are doing to reduce the threat to our environment and standard of living due to global warming,” said Hideaki Watanabe, Renault-Nissan Alliance managing director: Zero Emission Business.“The Alliance wants to be part of the solution for a sustainable society,” said Watanabe. “Our electric vehicles – which consume no fuel whatsoever – offer a real and affordable solution to drastically reducing CO2 emissions.”Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

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Study time for South Africa’s inmates

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first_img21 January 2014Correctional Services Minister Sibusiso Ndebele has called on South Africa’s 243 correctional centres to encourage inmates to participate in educational and skills programmes at the start of the 2014 academic year.“The Department of Correctional Services is implementing programmes aimed at turning around the lives of those who wronged society so that upon release, they are ideal, productive, law-abiding citizens,” Ndebele said in a statement on Monday. “Inmates must work and study, and leave correctional centres with a skill in one hand and a certificate in the other hand.”“The hand that was used to harm others must be changed into a hand which now builds and heals. The trilogy of victim-offender-community is central to all rehabilitation.”The department has increased the number of full-time correctional centre schools from only one in 2009 to 12 in 2013. In 2014, three additional schools – in Rustenburg (North-West province), Boksburg (Gauteng) and Ekuseni (Kwazulu-Natal)- are scheduled for accreditation.In 2013 the minister announced that, as of 1 April, it would be compulsory for every inmate without a qualification equivalent to Grade 9 to complete Adult Education and Training (AET) from level 1 to 4.Between April and September 2013, 11 649 inmates registered for AET programmes. From 2010 to 2013, 73 881 inmates participated in educational programmes.Over the past two years, 559 inmates wrote Grade 9 to 11 examinations, with an average pass rate of 73% in 2013.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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How Much Are Your Solar Panels Worth?

By on December 16, 2019

first_imgEach kilowatt of PV capacity adds nearly $6,000 to the value of a California home, but price premiums fall off quickly as the solar electric systems age, researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have found.In a summary of their findings, researchers report that price premiums are “strongly correlated” with the size of the system, adding $5,911 per kW. But each year the system ages causes the premium to drop.The report, “Exploring California PV Home Premiums,” was published in December and is available online for free.Building on results from earlier studies, researchers were looking into challenges that appraisers face as they value homes with photovoltaic systems. Under current practice, finding homes that are comparable in size and features, what appraisers call “comps,” is a key part of establishing value for both sales and refinancing.But even as PV systems becoming more commonplace, appraisers aren’t always sure how to value them, the report says. “Some appraisers and other home valuers assign no value to a home’s PV system, and those who do often cannot find comparable home sales to help determine the PV premium,” the study says.As a result, alternate methods for assigning value have developed. One is based on the value of energy produced by the PV system over its lifetime (the income approach). Another is based on the installed cost equivalent of the PV system (the cost approach).“However,” the report says, “those approaches have just begun to have been validated against actual market premiums. Moreover, the drivers underlying PV home premiums are not well understood, which may deter some appraisers from assigning value to PV systems.” Are current estimating tools working?Among the issues researchers attempted to address was the accuracy of estimating tools currently available to appraisers.One of them is a downloadable Microsoft Excel worksheet called PV Value, which is based on the income approach. It was developed by Sandia National Laboratories and Energy Sense Finance and Researchers. Researchers concluded that while it’s only beginning to be used, PV Value can be helpful in estimating market premiums for PV-equipped houses when comparable sales aren’t readily available.But results didn’t match market pricing, researchers said, adding, “the discrepancies between PV value estimates and estimated market-based premiums for California PV homes is an area where further research is warranted.” Price premiums greater than expectedResearchers looked at sales data on 1,894 PV-equipped homes sold in California from 2000 through 2009 and 70,425 non-PV homes sold during the same period and in the same neighborhoods as the PV homes. They set out to compare price premiums for the PV houses to estimates that could be derived from the cost approach and income approach.The decline in value seemed to come more quickly than either the income or cost approach would suggest, 9% per year vs. 0.5% decline predicted by the income approach or the 5% per year drop the income approach predicts.At the same time, premiums also were bigger than either of the two alternate methods would suggest. For a 3-kW PV system, for example, the replacement cost estimate was only 53% of the actual premium while the income estimate was 33% of the premium.Researchers said there were a “number of plausible explanations for this disparity,” including the possibility that buyers might be willing to pay more for houses with PV systems because of the “green cachet” or that income estimates understate the actual value of the power the PV systems produce.last_img read more

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Police read for kindergarten children as part of school program

By on September 17, 2019

first_img Prostitution crack down necessary says Premier to Police Commish Vanna White of Wheel of Fortune reads to Providenciales Children Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:Assistant Superintendent Butterfield, enid capron primary, kindergarten, reading, Royal Turks and Caicos Islands Police Force Recommended for youcenter_img Providenciales, 23 Feb 2016 – When the Kindergartners at the Enid Capron Primary School saw Acting Assistant Superintendent Butterfield of the Royal Turks and Caicos Islands Police Force this morning, they were overjoyed and shouted, “Police!”As part of the school’s 1st Annual Literacy Drive, which aims to engage parents, community, staff and students to promote the importance of reading and writing, Officer Butterfield was invited to read to the students.Assistant Superintendent Butterfield said she looks forward to reading to the children. “It gives them a positive idea of what officers are and that we are here to help them; we’re here to help guide them”. She said.Before reading the two (2) books from Dr. Seuss collection ‘Green Eggs and Ham’ and Mr. Brown can moo’ to the three Kindergarten classes, she informed the children that the Police are their friends and are there to protect them.The children listened attentively and were able to answer questions about the books correctly. “An early love of reading often translates into a thirst for knowledge that lasts a lifetime,” said Officer Butterfield. The children paid attention and showed much interest during the reading session.According to the Principal Mrs. Garland, “The Program is designed to assist the students with their reading and writing skills. We have planned a read aloud with Community persons, parent workshops in literacy and each month a teacher’s workshop in literacy. We are thankful for the police taking time from their busy schedule to come and read to our students.” Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp New: Tourist man fell or pushed; Police investigatinglast_img read more

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Bahamas Environment Ministry Holds Seminar on Strengthening Nuclear Energy and Radiation Regulations

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first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, October 31, 2017 – Nassau – The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Expert Mission to the Bahamas for Inventory of Radioactive Devices, Sources, and Radiation Equipment held a workshop for staff of the Ministry of the Environment and Housing and the Department of Environmental Health (DEHS) at the British Colonial Hilton, October 23-25, 2017.The IAEA is the United Nation’s agency charged with ensuring that radioactive and nuclear materials are secured and applied safely.The lecture for environmental health professionals on using nuclear materials for peaceful purposes officially opened on the Monday morning.  Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of the Environment and Housing, Janice Miller stated:  “The Bahamas became a member of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) during January 2014.  Since then we have been making incremental steps to establish a regulatory infrastructure for the safe and secure use of radioactive materials, including an independent regulatory body.“We are continuing to work with many of our partners including Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Bahamas Bureau of Standards, Ministry of Health, Health Facilities Council, Ministry of Works, Bahamas Customs Department, University of The Bahamas, Ministry of National Security, Attorney General’s Office and others, in order to achieve this objective.”Ms. Miller explained further that preliminary information suggests that radioactive technology is presently being used in The Bahamas in Medicine and Industry.“The activities of the IAEA experts and local team, for the next few days will assist in establishing and maintaining a national inventory of radiation sources, and by extension inform the process of our efforts in ultimately putting in place the appropriate regulation.  Of course the completion of this effort will have to be conducted by the local team, so funds will have to be accessed to make visits to the other islands,” said Ms. Miller.“In addition to other agencies being involved in training workshops, the Ministry of Environment and Housing is taking part in regional projects to begin building capacity in meeting the human and technical resource needs of all aspects of establishment of the needed regulatory infrastructure. The IAEA has been very helpful in this regard and will hopefully continue to give the necessary assistance.”Ms. Miller said that the proper legal framework is crucial to our country receiving full benefits as a member, and as a result, the Ministry of the Environment & Housing has prepared a Cabinet Paper for submission to Cabinet, so that we along with the Attorney General’s Office can officially begin drafting the regulations for the safe and secure use of radioactive material.“The salient components of the law will include, (1) Designation of regulatory body and functions (e.g. Authorization, Licensing, Inspection, Enforcement); (2) Radiation/nuclear protection and safety; (3) Safeguards; (4) Emergency preparedness and response; (5) Transportation of radioactive material; (6) Import/export; (7) Radioactive/nuclear waste/storage; and (8) Nuclear liabilities,” said Ms. Miller.“At each phase the IAEA will be consulted for guidance so that assurance is given that our obligations as a member, are met.   We along with The Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Attorney General’s Office will also give attention to the various international instruments, conventions, codes and protocols, which will strengthen the international response to nuclear accidents by providing a mechanism for rapid information exchange in order to minimize trans-boundary radiological consequences.”Ms. Miller concluded with saying the Ministry believes that “being a part of key conventions will strengthen the international response to a nuclear accident or radiological emergency, including a terrorist or other malicious act, thus protecting life, property and the environment against the effects of radioactive releases.”“It is my sincere desire that the objectives of this workshop are met and that the meeting will encourage us to continue to work together toward the common goal of establishing a regulatory infrastructure for the safe and secure use of radioactive materials, in The Bahamas,” said Ms. Miller.By: Gena Gibbs (BIS)Photo caption:  Group photo of the IAEA lecturers and participants from various agencies throughout the government, including the Ministry of the Environment & Housing and the Department of Environmental Health (DEHS) at the workshop opening session of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Expert Mission to the Bahamas for Inventory of Radioactive Devices, Sources, and Radiation Equipment, October 23-25, 2017.(BIS Photo/Gena Gibbs) Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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