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[The Source Podcast] Dell Technologies World Preview

By on February 27, 2021

first_imgDell Technologies World is NEXT WEEK!Dell Technologies World is for technologists, thought leaders and executives ready to transform their careers and organizations. Find topics at all levels of technical competency, from application development to infrastructure modernization; from innovation strategy to cloud and security. Tap into the expertise of Dell Technologies engineers, trailblazers and architects who make transformation real every day.With so much happening, where do you start?  I talked to Greg McCarthy (@GMcCarthy24) from the Dell Social Team to get the details on the action-packed conference.  Get all the details and the full agenda at www.DellTechnologiesWorld.comGet Dell EMC The Source app in the Apple App Store or Google Play, and Subscribe to the podcast: iTunes, Stitcher Radio or Google Play.Dell EMC The Source Podcast is hosted by Sam Marraccini (@SamMarraccini)last_img read more

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Customers Say OEM Partnerships Are Driving Huge Value in the Digital Economy

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first_imgChildren constantly ask “why?” I know that it can be tough for a parent to always provide an adequate answer of the why behind what we are asking our child to do, but honestly, knowing “why” helps children make sense of the world.A clear understanding of “why” is as important to your child’s development as it is to keeping clarity in one’s business decisions and strategy. Why did we launch that product or service again? I know what it does, but why did this new solution need to be offered? Did we ask enough of the “why” questions before moving forward with our business plan?Still asking “why?” As a father of three and as a kid at heart, I continue to ask “why,” As a marketer, the big question that has piqued my curiosity over the last year was this: Why is the OEM market continuing to grow so fast, particularly over the last few years, and why is Dell EMC OEM seeing such rapid growth in revenues? As much as I would like to say – great marketing, and as much as Sales would love to say that it is all due to an amazing sales force, we know there are more reasons behind the increased market demand for OEM relationships. By OEM, I’m talking about companies that purchase third-party technology to embed or integrate into a solution that they are building to market and resell to their customer.Of course, as Dell EMC OEM, we are delighted to be serving a market that has seen rapid demand for more OEM partnerships, but when we analyzed external contributory factors, like the improving global economy, our acquisition of EMC, and the formation of Dell Technologies, we knew that as important as these were to offering more to our customers, there had to be other growth drivers. Why are OEM partnerships on the rise? Why now versus the last two decades?Curiosity is the mother of all knowledgeWhenever you have questions related to your business challenges or successes, always ask the customer – “why?”Customer feedback was actually the impetus behind our OEM business – you can read more here. And so, when we have questions, we naturally turn to our customers for answers. With this in mind, we commissioned Futurum Research to conduct The OEM Partnership Survey. This captures the voices of more than 1,000 senior decision makers in OEM-type business models across the globe, examining the ability of OEM and third-party partnerships to drive innovation, improve time to market, and increase competitive value.Published today, the survey report makes for compelling reading. It validates and reflects many of our own experiences in the OEM marketplace, while also providing fresh insights. It’s a real treasure trove of interesting data. Today, I want to share just a few of the key takeaways that jumped off the page for me, as well as some customer use cases to help bring the data to life.Partnership speeds innovation and delivers increased revenueMost respondents cited OEM partnerships as being very or critically important in achieving key business objectives, like increased revenue and improved customer experience. For example, more than 88 percent of respondents say that existing OEM partnerships are helping them overcome barriers to innovation, with close to 83 percent indicating that OEMs had helped them accelerate their own product and services initiatives. As a result, two-thirds of the panel stated that they had been able to translate ideas into market offerings with their OEM Partnerships.Time to market matters more than everLet’s look at a great customer case in point. Bionivid, a genome IT company based in India, says it reduced its development costs by at least 50 percent by collaborating with Dell EMC OEM. By avoiding the expense of building hardware platforms, Bionivid was able to seize the right opportunity at the right time and gain an advantage over its competitors.Likewise, Tracewell Systems, an Ohio, USA-based provider of standard and custom electronic hardware systems for the military aerospace, automatic test equipment (ATE) and custom-of-the-shelf (COTS) markets realized its business goals by partnering with Dell EMC OEM. The integration, manufacturing, and global supply chain capabilities that came with the partnership allowed Tracewell to scale rapidly and get its products to market faster.Finding the right technology is criticalSurvey participants also believe that finding the right technology can make all the difference between winning and losing, with 81 percent saying that OEMs are helping them embrace emerging technology such as artificial intelligence (AI), multi-cloud, and the Internet of Things (IoT).Digital transformation case studyLet me share one customer story to help illustrate the power of partnership, particularly in the adoption of new technologies. Olivetti – an Italian brand established in 1908 and now Telecom Italia Group’s IoT specialist – provides small-and medium-sized manufacturers with an IoT-based plug-and-play solution to make their machines and plants smarter, and their operations more efficient and effective. To achieve this, Olivetti is working with Dell EMC OEM Solutions and Alleantia, a Dell EMC IoT Partner and Intel IoT Alliance member. The three companies have collaborated to develop a turnkey solution that enables the digital transformation of production processes into an Industry 4.0 implementation.Time waits for no oneBased on the survey’s findings, I would argue that time has become a more valuable commodity than the technology itself. Don’t get me wrong, technological innovation is arguably the biggest driver of human progress and advancement. However, most people – however smart and capable – no longer have the time to build bespoke, specialist technology. There’s so much technology out there, that it’s impossible to be an expert in everything. To succeed, you must collaborate where it makes the most sense to enable your business model.Businesses are feeling increasing pressure to drive new innovations into their operations or offerings, as more and more companies across every industry are becoming increasingly dependent on technology to bring their ideas to market. With time and expertise in short supply, forging or deepening the right technology partnerships is a business imperative. Why spend valuable time and resources developing technology that’s already available, when an OEM partner can help bring your solution to market faster and more efficiently?OEM market growth will continue to accelerateIt follows that as more and more companies are becoming time-poor but technology-enabled, there will be a corresponding increase in the need to build partnerships. As a result, the world of ecosystems and OEM relationships looks set to dramatically expand.In fact, one of the most exciting predictions to come out of the report is that OEM partnerships have the potential to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 20 to 25 percent over the next 10 years. Over 75 percent of the survey panel say they expect to increase their use of OEM partnerships over the coming 12 to 18 months, with over 25 percent anticipating that their use of OEM partnerships will increase dramatically.The expert vs the renaissance personHere’s a question for you to reflect upon: are you an expert or an adapter? While society has traditionally valued expertise, I believe that being an expert is no longer the main prize. Instead, the ability to adapt to change is what matters most in today’s dynamic world. In many ways, companies are going through the same challenges now that today’s young people will face in the future. Despite specializing in an area of study, our kids will likely have to switch careers, maybe several times during their lifetime. Companies need to develop that same agility, and partnerships are a way to get them there.Winning or losing – you decide!For me, the key takeaway is this: to survive and thrive in today’s world, you need to be well-rounded and versatile – somewhat of a renaissance person. However, there’s a caveat – renaissance person or not, you still need to use the tools of the future to stay ahead of the competition.The survey shows that forging the right partnerships will make all the difference between winning and losing. One prediction is that companies that engage in above-average levels of OEM partnership have the opportunity to accelerate sales growth and cost reductions by 35 and 45 percent by 2025.On the flip side, the survey also predicts that by 2025, up to 50 percent of current business will cease to exist in its current competitive state, driven by new technology and customer evolution. Here’s the burning question – where will you be in seven years’ time? Most importantly, “why?”What’s your take on the OEM market? Do you have insights to share? We would love to hear your comments and questions.Learn more about this survey! A summary infographic is available here or access the survey report here.Join our upcoming global webinar Stay Competitive with next generation OEM solutions here.Learn more about Dell EMC OEM visit: www.dellemc.com/oemJoin our LinkedIn OEM & IoT Solutions Showcase page here.Keep in touch. Follow us on Twitter @dellemcoemlast_img read more

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Stay Competitive With Next Generation OEM Solutions

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first_imgAn independent survey recently predicted that companies that engage in above average levels of OEM partnership have the opportunity to accelerate sales growth and cost reductions by 35 and 45 percent by 2025. On a more negative note, the survey also predicted that by 2025, up to 50 percent of current businesses will cease to exist.Digital dilemmasHere’s the big question – which side of the wave of disruption, do you want to be on? The wave can either propel you forward, leave you floating, looking for the next one to chase or immerse you in the deep. We all know that staying relevant and competitive is tough. There is no end game. New capabilities are affecting every industry and show no sign of abating.Customer experience is a key differentiator, yet expectations are rising and there’s the sheer pace of technology changes to contend with. Take, for example, supply chain security. It’s no longer enough to worry about the protection of your own IT systems but you now have to think about that of your critical suppliers. How much do you know about the third-party components in your solution and where they originate from?There are also challenges finding the right people – you need a slew of engineering talent, not just to develop your IP but also to manage integration, networking and the underlying platform. Business continues to get more complex.Next gen solutionsWhat can you do differently to stay competitive and accelerate growth? In my book, you have stay ahead of the curve and outpace disruption by innovating faster. I believe that as industries evolve through digital transformation, solution builders and their customers need a whole new generation of solutions to support their applications. We need horses for courses – the same old, same old isn’t going to cut it any more. A picture paints a thousand words so let’s talk a few industry examples.Digital transformation in manufacturingFor example, take the typical manufacturing plant. In the beginning, we had manual production with humans doing the work. Smart machines then arrived, freeing workers up to do more value-add activities. Smart factories were the next evolution, leveraging inventory and analytical systems. Machine vision then arrived on the scene to bring higher levels of accuracy to assembly and product inspection. Fast forward to today. Welcome to the era of the smart, interconnected factory, capable of linking into core business systems and shaping customer demand to match the factory and supplier capabilities.Increased appliance workloadAll good but here’s the crunch – with all these additional demands, the appliance workload is increasing all the time. Smart devices are continuing to feed even more data into the mix. In the smart, interconnected factory, your appliance now needs to be multi-functional, managing everything to do with production, from supply and demand modelling, and communicating with suppliers through to prioritizing production schedules and ramping up or down certain factories.Digital transformation is pervasiveHealthcare is another great example. Increasingly, technology is changing how patients and doctors interact with artificial intelligence being used for rapid and accurate diagnostics. In the telecom world, we can predict network usage and optimize for customer demand before a problem occurs. In smart surveillance, AI can analyse live video to stop crime in real time, allowing a single set of eyes to cover many cameras at once. When suspicious activity is detected, the relevant camera is highlighted and security personnel are called, only when needed.Data delugeApart from offering sophisticated solutions and an improved customer experience, what do these four examples share What is the Edge?It may sound like an obvious question but what is the Edge? Where is it located? The short answer is that can be wherever you want or need it to be. There’s no single definition. For example, in the telecom world, the Edge is considered anything not located in the core data center.  The Edge might be a micro data center placed in a sub region of a large city.Meanwhile in a smart city environment, the Edge might be a smart traffic light or a video surveillance camera. It could be processing video to count the number of pedestrians on a sidewalk to avoid sending all the raw video to the cloud or sending only when necessary or interesting.  In the transport or maritime industry, might be talking about the back of a truck or a ship on the high seas collecting engine data watching for anomalies and uploading data when available bandwidth is present. In many cases, we’re talking about challenging environments. As a result, rugged and highly available systems blended with the ability to withstand extreme temperatures are critical characteristics.in common? The answer is not just data, but real time understanding of the data. However, this tidal wave of data is threatening to overwhelm and consume us. Having an architecture that can handle this is critical. Surviving the wave is no longer enough. It’s all about being prepared to ride and surf the data for the benefit of your business and your customers versus going under.In tandem, of course, we’ve seen huge advances in compute power, moving from the traditional single-purpose operating systems to virtual environments and multi-functional appliances, all the way through to converged and hyper-converged solutions.The age of containerization and offload Well, get ready – Next Gen Computing is the new frontier! Think highly available compute power, extending from the Cloud to the Core to the Edge, elastic scalability and software-defined everything. By wrapping functions in a virtual machine or container, you can treat that function as an atomic entity. The advantages are that you can independently roll out or replace virtual functions in a modular fashion without impacting other functions.The modularity of these functions also allows you to build a multi-purpose solution. For example, in the case of the smart, interconnected factory, you can drop both the virtual machine vision solution plus a failure predicting solution into a single appliance, size it and go. It really represents the best of every world.Of course, as individual appliances need to run faster, you’ll need to offload capabilities to pack more processing power into denser space. It’s all about mapping what your workload needs to do and choosing the right accelerator – be that FPGA, GPGPU or ASIC.Data collection and analysisOf course, compute is just one half of the solution. It’s also going to matter where compute is done. In terms of analysis, I believe that industry needs to move to the Edge for data collection and real-time analysis while continuing to avail of a centralized Cloud for overall infrastructure. It’s usually not an either/or – you probably need both.It may sound like an obvious question but what is the Edge? Where is it located? The short answer is that can be wherever you want or need it to be. There’s no single definition. For example, in the telecom world, the Edge is considered anything not located in the core data center. In this instance, the Edge might be a micro data center, placed in a sub region of a large city.Meanwhile in a smart city environment, the Edge might be a smart traffic light or a video surveillance camera. For example, it could be processing video to count the number of pedestrians on a sidewalk to avoid sending all the raw video to the cloud or sending only information that’s necessary or interesting.Act on insights in real timeThe advantages are clear. With the Edge, you can process data close to the source and act on insights in real time. As more and more data sets are generated, it’s simply not going to be possible to send all data to the Cloud, at least not in real time, when they are most valuable. From a cost perspective, it makes sense to intelligently aggregate data at the Edge and send only what’s interesting or relevant out to the Cloud. In a lot of workloads, the Edge can be used to make quick data-based decisions with the Cloud just notified of the outcomes.Take the telecom example. With 5G, and the proliferation of mobile phone and IoT devices together with the growth of high content delivery services, edge computing is set to become increasingly relevant. Due to bandwidth, latency and security needs, not everything can and will go to the Cloud for routing or processing. I believe that it will be necessary to analyse traffic or data at the Edge, act on the data, if necessary, and then route the relevant data to the appropriate Cloud over the most cost-efficient uplink.Time to re-engineer your architectureIn summary, IoT, AI, machine learning, and analytics are merging. It will become impossible to meet new customer expectations by using traditional server appliances and the Cloud. The workloads are too intense, the networking too complex, and the environments too diverse.The key take-away is that hardware and software re-architecture is critical – the appliance and the way we conduct real-time data analysis has to evolve to address changing needs. The applications of the future will not run on the appliances of the past. The battle lines are already being drawn. Prepare now and get ready to ride the wave!What has been your experience in the market? Are you planning to re-architect your hardware and software solutions? We welcome your comments and questions.Learn more about next gen solutions from Dell EMC OEM: www.dellemc.com/next-gen-oemListen to the playback of our webinar on this topic here.Join our LinkedIn OEM & IoT Solutions Showcase page here.Keep in touch. Follow us on Twitter @dellemcoemlast_img read more

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Luminaries Podcast Episode 29: Complete the World’s Toughest Endurance Yacht Race…With Rugged Tech

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first_imgWhere can technology take your business? Join hosts Mark Schaefer and Douglas Karr on an IT transformation expedition. Listen in as they have in-depth conversations with technology luminaries who clear the path for your business growth – hear from analysts, partners, your peers and leaders across Dell Technologies. Find research, best practices and tools to make your IT transformation real.In this excerpt from Luminaries—Talking to the Brightest Minds in Tech, hosts Mark Schaefer and Douglas Karr speak with Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, (referred to as SIR JOHN, below), Founder and Chairman of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race and the first person to sail solo non-stop around the world.So tell us a little bit about the Clipper RaceSIR JOHN: Well, the Clipper Race, it’s an idea I got, I was up in Greenland mountaineering with a friend of mine, and he told me how much it cost him to climb Mount Everest. And it seemed an awful lot of money. And I thought, well, now, what’s the sailing equivalent? And I came to the conclusion it was a circumnavigation.And I thought, well, heck, there must be a load of people out there who’d love to do that, but don’t have enough confidence or not enough money to buy a boat. Supposing I supplied a boat and training and, you know, all the backups needed and offered it, how much would that cost? I worked it out on the back of an envelope, and it came to about half what it cost to climb Mount Everest. So, I met up with William Ward, and we put an advert in the papers saying we were planning on doing this, and got 8,000 answers.Once you’ve launched an idea like that, if you don’t do it, someone else will. So, we said, right, we’d better go ahead with this. So, in 11 months, we built eight boats. We recruited people, skippers, trained up the crews, and arranged a route around the world and started the first race. And really, the race is open to ordinary people who just want to go out there and do something extraordinary with their lives.So, we say to them, look, you don’t have to have any sailing experience, we’ll train you. In fact, I have to say, in many cases, the people who’ve never sailed before, easiest to train. They haven’t got any bad habits. But so, we train them up, and we put on the boats, and with professional skippers. And then we run a race around the world, calling at various places along the way.Now, we’ve been doing this for 23 years now, and we’ve taken some 5,000 people. Really given them an experience of a lifetime. And it’s fascinating to watch how they change. You know, the 18-year-old, a year later, is 24 in maturity terms. But even the chief executive of a company, who’s 60, comes back just standing that little bit taller. They’ve taken on nature in the raw, and they’ve looked it in the eye and they’ve survived it. They’ve something to be proud of.Sir John, of course this is a podcast about technology and digital transformation. Can you tell us what the onboard communication technology was like when you circumnavigated the globe in 1994?SIR JOHN: Well, Douglas, in fact, the first time I went around the world was 1968, ’69. And that was non-stop. And of course, one very simple thing you’ll recognize immediately, no satellites. So, there was no GPS. There was no satellite communication. We used single-side band radios, very low-powered. If you could get through, it was a miracle. But after two and a half months, mine broke down anyway. So, for the next eight months, I had no communication.So yeah, that was quite funny, because when I got back after passing New Zealand, where I saw some fishermen, no one heard anything of me for four and a half months, until I ran into some ships off the Azores. I remember a lady coming up to me and saying, weren’t you worried when you were missing? I said, madam, I knew exactly where I was.So, talk about the technology today, because it’s quite different. And you have this partnership with Dell, and this Rugged computer system that they’re providing to you. So, talk a little bit about the importance of technology today. And you know, you’ve talked quite a bit about the training and the safety. And it seems like technology plays a big role in all of that for the sailors of today.SIR JOHN: Well, you’re absolutely right. I mean, we have to move with the times. We have to accept what’s available to us. Our boats typically have three different satellite systems on them now. So, I can be anywhere in the world and call them up wherever they are. It doesn’t matter. Middle of the Pacific, middle of the Atlantic, I can get straight through to them on my mobile phone.This is a big safety thing, of course, but it’s a bit more than that, because we’ve got GPS, we’ve got satellite systems, we’ve got plotters. We’ve got our computers, which are fundamental to making these systems work. So, if you don’t have a good computer, you can’t work them. And then, of course, the next thing is you had a boat that’s rolling around, being smashed about a bit, water everywhere. You’ve got to have a tough computer, because otherwise they just don’t last.I mean, there were times in the past when we’ve probably renewed all the computers during the course of a race because they’ve just collapsed. And glad to say that’s no longer the case. But it was the case in the past.That’s just amazing. And when you really think about it, it’s amazing how this technology has advanced. I mean, just to look at in just a few short years, in a couple of decades, how we’ve come to rely on this technology, and how it’s all integrated through satellites. And Dell has this Rugged computer system that can withstand saltwater and everything you can throw at it.To listen to the full interview with Sir John, download the “Complete the World’s Toughest Endurance Yacht Race…With Rugged Tech” episode of Luminaries—Talking to the Brightest Minds in Tech. Discover Dell Technologies’ vision for the future and learn new capabilities, how to reinvent processes, innovate faster and create value that will change the game for your business & career. Register for Dell Technologies World today.last_img read more

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Reducing Wait Times With a New I/O Bottleneck Buster

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first_imgThe Data Accelerator from Dell Technologies breaks through I/O bottlenecks that impede the performance of HPC workloadsIn high performance computing, big advances in system architectures are seldom made by a single company working in isolation. To raise the system performance bar to a higher level, it typically takes a collaborative effort among technology companies, system builders and system users. And that’s what it took to develop the Data Accelerator (DAC) from Dell Technologies.This unique solution to a long-running I/O challenge was developed in a collaborative effort that drew on the expertise of HPC specialists from Dell Technologies, Intel, the University of Cambridge and StackHPC. The resulting solution, DAC, enables the next generation of data‑intensive workflows in HPC systems with an NVMe‑based storage solution that removes storage bottlenecks that slow system performance.How so? DAC is designed to make optimal use of modern server NVMe fabric technologies to mitigate I/O‑related performance issues. To accelerate system performance, DAC proactively copies data from a cluster’s disk storage subsystem and pre-stages it on fast NVMe storage devices that can feed data to the application at a rate required for top performance. Even better, this unique architecture allows HPC administrators to leave data on cost-effective disk storage until it is required by an application, at which point the data is cached on the DAC nodes.Plunge FrozenCryogenic Electron Microscopy (Cryo-EM) with Relion is one of the key applications for analyzing and processing these large data sets. Greater resolution brings challenges — as the volume of data ingest from such instruments increases dramatically, and the compute requirements for processing and analyzing this data explode.The Relion refinement pipeline is an iterative process that performs multiple iterations over the same data to find the best structure. As the total volume of data can be tens of terabytes in size, this is beyond the memory capacity of almost all current-generation computers and thus, the data must be repeatedly read from the file system. The bottleneck in application performance moves to the I/O.A recent challenging test case produced by Cambridge research staff has a size of 20TB. The I/O time for this test case on the Cumulus traditional Lustre file system versus the new NVMe DAC reduces I/O wait times from over an hour to just a couple of minutes.The Data Accelerator in the Cumulus supercomputer incorporates components from Dell Technologies, Intel and Cambridge University, along with an innovative orchestrator built by the University of Cambridge and StackHPC.With its innovative features, DAC delivers one of the world’s fastest open‑source NVMe storage solutions. In fact, with the initial implementation of DAC, the Cumulus supercomputer at the University of Cambridge reached No. 1 in the June 2019 I/O-500 list. That means it debuted as the world’s fastest HPC storage system, nearly doubling the performance of the second‑place entry.And here’s where this story gets even better. Today, Dell Technologies is sharing the goodness of DAC by making the solution available to the broad community of HPC users via an engineering-validated system configuration covering DAC server nodes, memory, networking, PCIe storage and NVMe storage.Ready for a deeper dive?For a closer look at DAC, including system configuration details, see the Data Accelerator solution brief.For a detailed technical examination of the DAC architecture and development effort, see “HPC Innovation Exchange: The Data Accelerator.”To download the DAC software stack, visit Cambridge University GitHub page.Read the Dell Technologies case study with Cambridge University.last_img read more

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