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Lyceum Bowling League results

By on May 2, 2021

first_imgIn team results: Fryczynski’s Funeral Home took 7 points from Supreme Tours; I.B.E.W. Local 94 took 6 points from John’s Midtown Tavern; Amspec Services took 5 points from Dworzanski’s Funeral Home. Results of the Mount Carmel Lyceum bowling league from May 9 are as follows: Individual high games for the week went to: Jack Nilan 246; David Magarban 222; Artie Bernard Jr. 211; Harry Ashe 211; Robert Lesiak 205; Ed Lubach Sr. 202; John McCollum 202; Rich Traver 201; Ed Lubach Jr. 194; Adam Konecko 194; Robert Magarban 194; Frank Giovinazzo 180; Al Gill 170; Frank Polomski 166.last_img read more

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That One Time Lou Reed’s Speaker Blew Up And He Kept Recording As Smoke Filled The Studio [Video]

By on March 2, 2021

first_imgLou Reed is a legendary figure in the mythology of rock and roll. He released more than 25 albums over the course of his career as a solo act and with The Velvet Underground, winning a devoted following with his poetic lyrics, experimental guitar playing, and distinctive New York City grit. In a new animated clip, decorated record producer/engineer Sean Slade tells his story about an “explosive” incident in the studio with Reed. As Slade explains,His gear was always the best and most expensive, because he was an international rock star. He had these wonderful custom-made monitors, and he made the studio take their monitors aside and put up his monitors. We’re doing an overdub with a big power chord, and he’s got this monster pedal board. … So he hit the power chord and it feeds back and it creates this lovely feedback in the beginning, and then the acoustic part comes in. And then, suddenly, something happened and the assistant engineer started to scream—literally scream. I looked up and I saw that he had hit a pedal, and he increased the volume exponentially. What had happened was, he had shoved the meter totally into the red, and smoke started to pour out of the tweeters in the monitors because we had it set up for one level, and he increased the volume so much that the system just couldn’t handle it. The engineer thought we were going to break the tape board, so he reached over to turn the tape recorder off, and I literally grabbed him and said “no, no, no, don’t touch it, don’t touch it.” Smoke’s pouring out. He gets it done, we stop the machine, and we look at each other like, “Oh god, What do we do?” So I say, alright, let’s be men, so I walk right in and say, Lou, we blew up your speakers.And he said “Oh… Did it happen when I hit the pedal?” And I go, “Yea.” And he goes, “Did you get it on tape?” And I said “Yes.” … He didn’t care that we blew up the speakers. In fact, I think he was secretly pleased.You can watch the animated Lou Reed story as told by Sean Slade below:This animated Lou Reed story comes as the fourth part of Berklee Online’s Master Track series, each of which includes narration from one of the Berklee Online Masters in Music Business and Masters in Music Production programs. Additional videos in the series feature Prince Charles Alexander (Commercial Vocal Production) reminiscing about how it wasn’t until he recorded the Notorious B.I.G. that he learned to appreciate hip-hop; Susan Rogers (who will be teaching Psychoacoustics in Music Production) reminiscing about an exceptionally busy day in the life as recording engineer for Prince; and E. Michael Harrington (Music Business Law) sharing how he helped bring the Civil Rights-era anthem, “We Shall Overcome” into the public domain. You can watch all the videos in the series here.Rest in peace, Lou Reed.last_img read more

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Making magic out of 26 letters

By on March 1, 2021

first_img“She wants the reader to hate her a bit,” he said.Replied Abramson: “She doesn’t want the readers to identify.”In his fiction workshop, Johnston gave his class writing exercises. Some students had to write from the point of view of someone walking on the beach who just killed another, without mentioning the murder. He encouraged the students to focus on how they could tell the story, describing the view, the waves, and the moon.“If you can narrow the field, it can liberate you. It’s like playing tennis without a net. The net makes the game,” he said, before leading the class into a lively discussion about dialogue.“Arrive late to the conversation and leave early,” he advised. “Less is more.” Then he banned students from using any dialogue tags beyond “said” or “asked.”“The days of ‘screamed,’ ‘retorted,’ ‘whistled,’ those days are gone and you’re a better person for it,” he said.Maddy Nam asked: “How about italics?”“By all means. I’ll take italics over tags any day of the week,” he said.Before class, Johnston shared news that alumna Weike Wang ’11 recently got a book deal. Hong Kong-born British poet Sarah Howe, who studied with Jorie Graham, Boylston Professor of Oratory and Rhetoric, as a Radcliffe fellow, won the 2016 T.S. Eliot Prize for “Loop of Jade.”“Everyone’s work is paying off,” Johnston said. “All of the faculty go to workshop feeling inspired, and three hours later the inspiration has multiplied tenfold.”Though many graduates find jobs and publish their work, he rarely mentions their evident success in classes.“One of the ways our program is so different than many in the country is that we’re focusing on the literary art that students are making. By focusing on that, publication and stage and film productions, those are necessarily going to follow. But we never talk about them,” he said. “Everyone here cares about language and making something that matters out of 26 letters and their infinite combinations. It’s humbling and thrilling.” Brynn Elliott ’18 brings philosophical depth to songwriting Three chords and some Kierkegaard Related Writing is a solitary process, but Bret Johnston doesn’t believe it needs to be a lonely one.“Yes, you’re alone a lot of the time, but when you find that community where people care about the same things you care about, things many people in the world don’t care about as deeply as you, you feel as though you’re being welcomed home,” said Johnston, the Paul and Catherine Buttenwieser Director of the Creative Writing Program and senior lecturer on English.That collective sense of creative vibrancy is why he believes the program has blossomed by nearly every measure. Led by Johnston, it now has a faculty of 11 with the most recent announcement of food and science writer Michael Pollan joining to teach nonfiction writing next fall. He joins recent hires Jill Abramson, who teaches journalism, and Paul Yoon and Laura van den Berg as Briggs-Copeland Lecturers. Two noteworthy gifts, the Gore Vidal Presidential Fund and the Joseph Y. Bae and Janice Lee Arts Lectureship, announced earlier this year, allow for even more creativity, which is evident in the 36 percent of senior theses among English department concentrators that were creative theses (versus 31 percent for critical theses).“To make art or to produce nonfiction is to imagine the remaking of an always-recalcitrant world,” said James Simpson, chair of the English department and Donald P. and Katherine B. Loker Professor of English. “Our lustrous creative writing faculty models a distinctive ethos of teaching and writing. Students need to understand where they are coming from and where they are going. The ethos of this department gives them a disciplined voice and an inspiring direction.”There is also a workshop called “Writing for Television: Developing the Pilot,” which was taught for the first time this fall by playwright Sam Marks. Sitting in a recent class in the Barker Center, the dozen students began with a discussion of a homework assignment, which included watching “Mr. Robot,” a drama about cyber security airing on USA Network.“Every scene, he’s doing something. He’s always driving toward something,” Marks said, before asking Nina Sapers, a senior concentrating in English, to share her working pilot.Sam Marks (center), Briggs Copeland Lecturer on English, teaches “Writing for Television: Developing the Pilot,” a new workshop to develop television screenplays, between students Sam Hardy ’18 (left) and Zindzi Hammond-Hanson ’19. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerAfter distributing roles to the class for a read-through of “Frederick,” a story about Megan, an unemployed recent college graduate, and her fish that ended with an escape from a family barbeque, Marks opened a feedback discussion that lasted more than a half hour.“Frederick” was “structurally sound” and “super funny,” classmates told the 22-year-old Quincy House resident. One liked “that everyone’s invested in her life.” Along with the positive reactions, there were constructive suggestions: Why not have fewer characters in service of more fleshed-out characters?Marks put several questions to Sapers to answer in future revisions, including “What do you want to find out?” and “What is she after, not just running from?”“I have taken two fiction-writing classes before the pilot-writing class,” Sapers said. “I’ve met people I’m still friends with now, people I have an immense amount of admiration for, people who consistently gave thoughtful, engaging feedback. The level at which people are writing in these classes is crazy good.”That verbal volley of ideas is the cornerstone of the program, Johnston said. “It raises the emotional level in the room, and the students take that very seriously. Those discussions can feel transformative, not just for the piece of writing, but [for] the writer and the writers who are responding to it.”Such was the case in Jill Abramson’s class, “Introduction to Journalism,” in which students studied first-person writings from Ron Suskind (a memoir called “Life, Animated” about his family and his son’s autism) and Ariel Levy’s tale of her miscarriage while on assignment in Mongolia. Shaun Gohel called out The New Yorker staff writer for her fear of getting “Mongolian AIDS” when an EMT put in an IV.last_img read more

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Winooski River Rapid Impeded by Bridge Debris

By on January 1, 2021

first_imgWinooski River Rapid Impeded by Bridge DebrisMONTPELIER – Debris associated with the Route 2 bridge span that toppled into the Winooski River earlier this week has been lodged in a nearby river rapid and poses a danger to paddlers using the Winooski.Canoeists, kayakers and others recreating in this section of the Winooski should exercise caution when paddling the river as the debris has the potential to be dangerous if a boater were to be swept into it.Junkyard Rapid, the first major river feature below the Route 2 bridge being demolished on the Middlesex/Moretown line, has collected some debris from the structure that fell into the Winooski River due to high water. Junkyard Rapid is located behind the auto salvage yard along Route 2 between Waterbury and Middlesex, and can be seen from the road. Anyone boating this stretch of river below the bridge demolition project should use extreme caution.In this area, work crews have anchored barges that cannot be removed until the river subsides, while large steel job boxes also remain in the river just down stream from where the bridge was located. But of particular concern is debris lodged in Junkyard Rapid.Junkyard Rapid is located in the main channel at the run out or bottom of the rapid. The debris is creating a sieve like-entrapment situation which has the potential to be dangerous if a boater were to be swept into it.It is highly recommended that boaters avoid the stretch of river between the bridge demolition project and Junkyard Rapid. Until the water recedes and work crews can remove the debris, the debris will remain in the river creating a potential hazard to paddle.#####last_img read more

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Compliance: NCUA releases new call report form, instructions

By on December 17, 2020

first_img continue reading » 25SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NCUA has released its new call report form and accompanying instructions, which become effective Sept. 30. For credit unions engaged in commercial lending, most notable are the updates reflecting the January 2017 changes to the member business lending (MBL) rule.The MBL rule creates a distinction between MBLs and commercial loans, and the new call report form is updated to report the separate categories.The call report instructions contain a list to help clarify the distinction between the two loan types, similar to the chart created earlier this year by CUNA compliance staff.The Instructions also explain that the reporting of commercial loans will be broken down into subcategories such as:last_img read more

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Heartland Town Square Proposal Is Too Big For Only Islip Town Board’s Approval

By on December 16, 2020

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Could one small township have the power to approve the largest development project in Long Island’s history? That seems to be what’s shaping up for Jerry Wolkoff’s ambitious Heartland Town Square for the former Pilgrim State property in Islip Town.Wolkoff is taking an all-or-nothing approach to the project. Heartland could affect the future of Long Island.As the 1990s dawned, Pilgrim State Psychiatric Center, once one of the largest such mental institutions in the world, was in its twilight. Psycho-pharmaceuticals were growing in popularity for treating severe mental illness, and large-scale psychiatric treatment centers like Pilgrim had become obsolete. Decentralization had already led to Edgewood State Hospital, Pilgrim’s sister center in Deer Park, being shuttered and demolished. The western portion of the Pilgrim property had been subdivided in 1974, eventually becoming home to the western campus of Suffolk County Community College.Now planners were anticipating what lay in store for the remaining large tract of land that Pilgrim State had occupied for decades.The 1992 plan for Pilgrim State’s property arose out of environmental necessity. The Long Island Comprehensive Special Groundwater Protection Area Plan, a crowning achievement of environmental planning and policymaking by the Long Island Regional Planning Board, staked out the property’s fate with modest recommendations for development. Their findings had determined that the Pilgrim State properties, as well as the former Edgewood site, a total of 3,000 acres, were—and still are—hydro-geologically important for recharging Long Island’s freshwater underground aquifer. Subsequently, the site was named specifically as the Oak Brush Plains Special Groundwater Protection Area, or SGPA for short.The SGPA plan recommended halting development until the site could be completely hooked up to the sewer infrastructure of the Southwest Sewer District and immediately reducing its potential for illegal dumping and storage. It called for subdividing the property into large lots for “dry” industrial usage that minimized the risk of noxious spills and production waste, as well as commercial development and ensuring “the quality of future non-residential development in the area.” Last but not least, it urged the State, Suffolk County and Islip Town to “maximize the preservation of existing open space within their respective holdings so as to protect the remaining undisturbed recharge areas.”While the special groundwater plan was being formulated in the early 1990s, the Long Island Pine Barrens Society filed a lawsuit to freeze future development in critical areas of Long Island’s aquifer until a long-term strategy to protect our region’s vulnerable water supply could be created. In an op-ed in The New York Times, David Stern, who was then-executive director of the New York State Assembly’s Legislative Commission on Water Resource Needs of Long Island, warned that “development projects approved before the lawsuit was filed are being constructed in these areas. Many municipalities that have the absolute authority on development within [the] protection areas have blatantly ignored their importance to Long Island’s groundwater by approving overly dense developments.”More than 25 years later, Stern’s words are still just as true today.By all accounts, Jerry Wolkoff is a very driven individual. Starting in 1984, he built the Heartland Business Park, which spans roughly 500 acres. Then in 2001, he purchased 460 acres of the 778-acre Pilgrim site for around $20.1 million. As The New York Times put it, “With the purchase of Pilgrim State, Mr. Wolkoff will own more than 900 contiguous acres of land in the Town of Islip, including Heartland, which is adjacent to the Pilgrim site.”By any measure, Wolkoff’s Heartland Town Square is a monumental proposal. For the 452 acres, Wolkoff wants to change the current as-of-right single-family residence zoning district to a new “planned-unit-development zone”, or PUD for short. The current zoning has each unit on a 40,000-square foot minimum lot size, which is more in line with the less-impact development called for by the SGPA plan, while the new PUD zoning significantly increases the developmental density. The breakdown of proposed usage is as follows:• Office Space: 4,039,500-square feet• Retail: 1,030,000-square feet• Civic Space: 110,500-square feet• Residential: 9,130 housing units• Total: 15,500,000-square feetThe project would be built out in three five-year phases, with the total project taking 15 to 20 years to reach completion. So far, the ground has not been broken but some work has commenced, such as demolishing an old LIRR bridge over Commack Road and beginning some preliminary utility projects. Some projections say that 20,000 new residents may eventually live there. But who knows if they ever will.Not much has changed on Long Island since Wolkoff first announced his ambitious plans…except that the climate has become much friendlier to developers overall. In recent years, multi-family developments have been in vogue, with projects such as the Ronkonkoma Hub and Wyandanch Rising grabbing headlines in the papers and approvals by the municipalities. Suddenly, the humongous Heartland Town Square seems to fit the bill. After years of delay, the Islip Town Board finally signaled that they were more open to the project when they adopted the proposal’s Final Generic Environmental Impact Statement last May.Over the years, the project has run into more than a few delays, but one particular point of contention between Islip and Wolkoff still remains: Who exactly will pay for the public improvements that will be necessary to allow for such colossal growth? Payment of what are called mitigation or impact fees is often debated whenever a development is being proposed, but the burden of cost in this case is particularly heavy. Substantive roadway upgrades will be needed on the Sagtikos Parkway, Long Island Expressway and other local roads to handle the proposed growth as each phase is completed. Improvements include additional lanes on the parkway, which would impact every interchange along the route, as well as the potential for an additional lane on the LIE, which would be a massive undertaking. These two large projects eclipse all the local roads that will need widening as well as other modifications to allow them to handle the additional traffic volume Heartland is slated to generate.Simply put, if Wolkoff gets his increased density approved, the public improvements should be financed by the developer. Currently, the level of service on Long Island’s roads, graded like a middle-school essay from F to A, is at a mediocre B, at best. The Heartland proposal would put undue burden on the neighboring communities, and residents should not have to shoulder the costs to maintain the currently deplorable condition of our road network.Not all of Wolkoff’s entire proposal is bad. His preservation of an elegant pre-existing brick tower that once supplied Pilgrim’s water needs as the focal point of one of the many new residential districts is a nice, tasteful adaptive reuse, as is the proposed repurposing of the former power station into an art gallery.Development of the Pilgrim site should happen, but not at this scale.After the first phase is completed, the Town of Islip and its residents should stop to assess the economic climate, study the regional inventory of commercial, office and residential needs, and adapt to the new regional conditions. Why should we oversaturate the region with unnecessary growth that will have impacts far beyond the Town of Islip’s borders? Long Islanders pride themselves on the principal of home-rule, which gives a local community the ability to control its own land usage, but mega-projects like Heartland justify the need for strong, unfettered, comprehensive regional planning.It is critical for Long Island’s residents to remember that there is a marked distinction between “builders,” who often seek to profit from development, and “planners,” whose goal is the long-term vibrancy of the community. The goal of planning is to balance development and preservation within the existing community framework.Long Islanders cannot let Heartland—and Heartland alone—dictate the future of not only the Town of Islip, but the region as a whole.Without taking a comprehensive approach, Long Island’s future is in the hands of the town board members of one municipality. Can we trust them to think beyond their election cycle and their borders?Rich Murdocco writes on Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco will be contributing regularly to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea‬.last_img read more

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DERA frees up Surrey site

By on October 20, 2020

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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PREMIUMJakarta, West Java cities brace for floods

By on October 19, 2020

first_imgGoogle Forgot Password ? Facebook Local authorities are preparing mitigation measures as they anticipate floods in the upcoming rainy season, after parts of Jakarta and West Java were already inundated on Monday.The Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency (BMKG) predicts that the rainy season – which often brings floods – will begin in late October or early November this year, but several regions have already reported torrential rain during the current transition from the dry to the wet season.The BMKG has warned of possible extreme weather during the transitional period from September and October in some parts of Indonesia, particularly in West Java. It predicts that heavy rain, lightning and thunderstorms are likely in 24 provinces from Sept. 22 to 24 and in 26 provinces from Sept. 26 to 28.The agency has asked the public to be on alert for possible flooding, flash floods landslides … Linkedin Topics : Log in with your social account LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here #flooding floods Ciliwung-river #Jakarta #bogor rainy-season #rainy-season flood-control West-Java #WestJavalast_img read more

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GUEST BLOG: Eight Tree Stand Safety Tips Hunters Should Know Before Heading to the Woods

By on October 16, 2020

first_imgGUEST BLOG: Eight Tree Stand Safety Tips Hunters Should Know Before Heading to the Woods November 27, 2017   SHARE  TWEET Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf PSA,  The Blog The sun has risen on yet another opening day of Pennsylvania’s firearm deer season. As the season kicks off, hunters are busily sighting-in rifles, making plans with family and friends, and scouting for areas with promising signs of buck activity.Great strides have been made over the decades to improve hunting safety. Hunters should be proud of the fact that last year, no hunting-related shooting fatalities occurred.This remarkable achievement can largely be attributed to the 2,237 men and women who volunteer to teach hunter-education, which is a mandated course for new license buyers. It’s also testament to a hunting community that remains vigilant about safety.As hunters take to the woods, there is one thing they could do to further ensure their health and well-being, and that is to wear a full-body harness if they plan to use a tree stand. The use of tree stands has skyrocketed over the last two decades and in 2004, we reached a point where injuries from tree stand falls surpassed injuries from firearms.Data concerning tree stand accidents is lacking and is often understated, but some alarming trends are beginning to emerge. Per the PA Game Commission, a hunter who spends 50 years hunting deer with both a bow and a gun, has a 1 in 20 chance of being injured in a fall from a tree stand at some point in their hunting career.Stay Safe by Following These Simple GuidelinesAlways wear a full-body harness (most fall victims in recent studies were not wearing full-body harnesses).Put your full-body harness on the moment your foot leaves the ground, until it returns. This is especially important for those who use tree-climber stands.Don’t leave your stands out in the elements all year long.Inspect your stands and ladders before using them.If you’re hunting in an area with cell reception, keep a cell phone in a reachable pocket.Attach a small, fixed-blade knife to the upper portion of your harness.Wear a whistle.Always let someone know where you’re hunting and when you expect to return.Have fun hunting this year and please be safe!For more information regarding deer hunting season and hunter’s safety, please watch this tree stand safety video or visit the Pennsylvania Game Commission website. By: Robert Miller, Governor’s Advisor for Hunting, Fishing & Conservation SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Bulldogs Clinches Lead In Sixth Inning For Victory Over Connersville

By on September 23, 2020

first_imgBatesville opened their EIAC schedule on Monday at home against Connersville and won 5-2. While the Bulldogs took the lead in the first inning off of Trey Heidlage’s solo home run, eventually Connersville knotted it up 2-2 after two innings. Batesville took the lead late in the game at 5-2. The game was tied at two with the Bulldogs batting in the bottom of the sixth when Brayden Linkel singled, stole a base, and then scored on Heidlage’s double. Batesville scored two more runs in that inning.Sam Voegele pitched and earned the win for the Bulldogs in his first start and appearance of the season. He surrendered two runs on two hits over six innings, striking out five. Caleb Raab threw one inning in relief out of the bullpen and earned his second save on the season for Batesville.D Bowing took the loss for Connersville. He lasted five innings, allowing seven hits and three runs while striking out two.The Bulldogs racked up eight hits on the evening, while holding Connersville to three. Nate Slavin, Heidlage, and Linkel each managed multiple hits for Batesville.The Bulldogs improve their record to 2-0 overall and 1-0 in the EIAC.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Justin Tucker.last_img read more

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