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Xerox and Naval Postgraduate School Announce Collaboration to Advance Solutions with 3D Printing Research

By on June 2, 2021

first_img Facebook Local NewsBusiness Xerox and Naval Postgraduate School Announce Collaboration to Advance Solutions with 3D Printing Research Facebook TAGS  Twitter Pinterest Twittercenter_img The Xerox ElemX™ 3D Liquid Metal Printer delivers flexibility and resiliency to manufacturing supply chains. WhatsApp Pinterest By Digital AIM Web Support – February 3, 2021 Previous articleKindred Partners with S&H Systems to Improve Accuracy and Efficiency for E-Commerce Fulfillment OperationsNext articleSMART Modular Expands DuraMemory™ Offerings with Proprietary DIMM Retention Device for Harsh Operating Environments Digital AIM Web Support WhatsApplast_img read more

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Delhi HC Gives Relief To Ad-Hoc Assistant Professor Whose Services Were Terminated For Taking A Maternity Break [Read Order]

By on May 26, 2021

first_imgNews UpdatesDelhi HC Gives Relief To Ad-Hoc Assistant Professor Whose Services Were Terminated For Taking A Maternity Break [Read Order] Karan Tripathi7 May 2020 8:20 AMShare This – xDelhi High Court has quashed the termination letter of an ad-hoc Professor whose contract was not renewed by the College as she had taken a maternity leave, which was not approved by the said College. While directing the College to reinstate the Appellant Professor within one week, the Division Bench of Justice Hima Kohli and Justice Asha Menon imposed a cost of ₹50,000 on…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginDelhi High Court has quashed the termination letter of an ad-hoc Professor whose contract was not renewed by the College as she had taken a maternity leave, which was not approved by the said College. While directing the College to reinstate the Appellant Professor within one week, the Division Bench of Justice Hima Kohli and Justice Asha Menon imposed a cost of ₹50,000 on the Respondents for giving arbitrary and unmerited reasons for not renewing the term of the Appellant. Facts The Appellant was a contractual Assistant Professor at the Respondent College, and her term was coming to an end on 18/03/19. It has been a practice to renew the term of contractual teachers for 120 days after giving them a nominal break of one day between the two terms. On 22.02.2019, she had requested the Respondent College for grant of maternity leave alongwith all other eligible benefits under the Maternity Benefit Act, 1961 and had specifically sought leave from 14.01.2019 till 24.05.2019, particularly, in view of the complications of pregnancy. However, she received no reply from the Respondent College despite making multiple representations. After reiterating he request for maternity leave, she received a communication from the Respondent College on 27/03/19, stating that the college had not “forced” her to join duty and that she should also inform the college of the date when she “intended” to join, thus, indicating that she was still on their rolls. However, later she received a communication from the College stating that the Delhi University doesn’t extend maternity benefits to contractual teachers, thus, rejecting her request for maternity leave. On 24/05/19 she reported to College to continue with her duties. However, five days later it was informed to her that her tenure had ended on 18.03.2019, she was no longer on the rolls of the college and therefore, there was no question of her joining back on duty or being assigned any work. Arguments Advanced by Appellant Senior Advocate Darpan Wadhwa, who appeared for the Appellant, submitted that the Appellant was the seniormost ad-hoc Assistant Professor working in the English Department of the Respondent College and that after her service was terminated illegally and unlawfully, those who were junior to her, were given extensions throughout the same academic year, right from May, 2019 till date. He further submitted that if there was a need for fewer ad-hoc teachers, then the last come had to go first and not the seniormost teacher particularly when she had disclosed her availability. It was also argued by Mr Wadhwa that it was only because the Appellant had insisted on maternity benefits that, out of sheer vengeance, her ad-hoc appointment was not extended and therefore, the termination letter was liable to be quashed. Arguments Advanced by the Respondents Appearing for the Delhi University, Mr Mohinder JS Rupal submitted that submitted that no ad-hoc teacher was entitled to maternity leave as the Rules did not provide for the same and the Appellant could not seek any such benefit or claim extension of her tenure on the plea that when her tenure had ended on 18.03.2019. He also submitted that there is no vested right in ad-hoc teachers to claim extension of tenure. Senior Advocate Sudhir Nandrajog, who appeared for the Respondent College, argued that the Appellant had not disclosed that she was ever willing or readily available for teaching in the following semesters and therefore, it cannot be stated that the Respondents had violated any law while appointing other teachers on an ad-hoc basis who were available to attend to the semester classes, even if they were junior to the Appellant. Mr Nandrajog further submitted that it was well within the Respondent’s right to terminate the appointment of the Appellant as her appointment letter itself contained such a clause. Court’s Observations While calling the arguments advanced by the Respondents as ‘unmerited’, the court observed that when the Appellant had expressed her availability for engagement on 24.05.2019 and when on the following day, the others were actually appointed as ad-hoc employees, there was no good reason for the Respondent College to have refused to engage her either on 26.05.2019 alongwith the others, or at the very least from 20.07.2019, when the others were reappointed. While highlighting that the validity of a termination order is subject to judicial review, the court noted that the Appellant had a right to be considered and could not be subjected to the whimsical and arbitrary decisions of the respondents when fundamentally, there was a need for the appointment of ad-hoc Assistant Professors and her performance has remained blemishless throughout. In light of these observations, the court quashed the termination letter dated 29/05/19 and directed the Respondent College to send the appointment letter to the Appellant within one week. The court has also imposed a fineClick Here To Download Order[Read Order] Next Storylast_img read more

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Medical and personal info being shared online following cyber attack – Claim

By on May 25, 2021

first_img Facebook Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter AudioHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest DL Debate – 24/05/21 Google+ Medical and personal info being shared online following cyber attack – Claim Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows It’s claimed medical and personal information about patients IS now being shared online.The Financial Times says it’s seen screenshots and files, following the cyber attack by hackers on the HSE.The records available online include internal health files, minutes of meetings, equipment purchase details, and correspondence with patients.Head of the HSE, Paul Reid, is describing the ransomware attack as ‘unfair, unjust and incomprehensible’.Technology Correspondent Jess Kelly says some very sensitive data is now being shared online:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/kelly830.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.center_img WhatsApp Twitter News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme By News Highland – May 19, 2021 Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Previous article10% stamp duty introduced on purchase of 10 or more housesNext articleWilliam O’Connor named Assistant Manager at UCD News Highland last_img read more

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Coronavirus live updates: South Australia quarantines 4,000 amid medi-hotel cluster

By on May 18, 2021

first_imgOvidiu Dugulan/iStockBy JON HAWORTH, ERIN SCHUMAKER, IVAN PEREIRA and MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 1.3 million people worldwide.Over 55 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks. The criteria for diagnosis — through clinical means or a lab test — has also varied from country to country.Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the virus has rapidly spread to every continent except Antarctica. The United States is the worst-affected nation, with more than 11.2 million diagnosed cases and at least 247,220 deaths.Nearly 200 vaccine candidates for COVID-19 are being tracked by the World Health Organization, at least 10 of which are in crucial phase three studies. Of those 10 potential vaccines in late-stage trials, there are currently five that will be available in the United States if approved.Here’s how the news is developing Tuesday. All times Eastern:Nov 17, 10:37 amNebraska hospital ‘bursting at the seams’ with COVID-19 patientsDr. Brian Boer, a critical care doctor working in the COVID-19 wing of Nebraska Medicine in Omaha, said his “nightmare scenario” is one in which non-coronavirus patients have to be turned away because the hospital is “bursting at the seams with so much COVID.”“If you ask some of my colleagues and partners, like, we’re there,” Boer told “Start Here,” ABC News’ daily news podcast.“You know, in terms of the trajectory we’re on, if it continues like this unabated, like, we’re going to end up in the scenario where we’re going to have to make really difficult decisions and tell people we can’t offer them the things we normally would have,” he added. “We’re knocking on that door right now.”The number of people being hospitalized for COVID-19 in Nebraska each day has quadrupled over the past month, which Boer said is reflective of what he’s seeing in his hospital, where almost half of all intensive care patients are battling the disease.The issue isn’t the lack of ICU beds or ventilators, he said, but rather the lack of adequate staffing.“We’ll create beds or we have ventilators and the space or the equipment — we don’t have the bodies,” Boer said. “We don’t have the nurses, the respiratory therapist, the residents and advanced practice providers and physicians to care for that person.”Boer said he isn’t seeing a lot of spread among health care providers, thanks to personal protective equipment.“We’re more worried about getting sick in the community than we are getting sick at work — and that’s a fact,” he said.Nov 17, 9:21 amOver 300 attended wedding leading to outbreak in Washington state, officials sayHealth authorities are urging attendees of a large wedding held in Washington state to quarantine through Saturday and get tested for COVID-19 after several guests have tested positive.At least 17 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Washington’s Grant County have been linked to the wedding near Ritzville on Nov. 7, which was attended by more than 300 people from various communities. The Grant County Health District said more cases tied to the event are “being added daily” and that attendees diagnosed with COVID-19 have also been linked to two subsequent outbreaks.Wedding ceremonies at the time were limited to a total of no more than 30 people and, starting Monday, indoor receptions or similar gatherings are banned, according to the Grant County Health District.Nov 17, 8:34 amFederal vaccine expert turned whistleblower says ‘lives are at stake’ if Trump doesn’t coordinate with BidenDr. Rick Bright, the federal vaccine expert who blew the whistle on a politicized coronavirus response, said that “lives are at stake” if the outgoing Trump administration does not coordinate with President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team over vaccine distribution.“Lives are at stake here,” Bright, an immunologist who was recently named a member of Biden’s transition COVID-19 advisory board, told ABC News chief anchor George Stephanopoulos in an interview Tuesday on Good Morning America.“If we miss this opportunity to coordinate now, we could experience hiccups or delays that really we don’t need to see,” he added. “Americans deserve a smooth transition so we can make sure to save their lives from this pandemic.”The Biden transition team planned to meet with vaccine manufacturers this week, and Bright, whose life’s work has been developing vaccines, said he hoped they would provide more detailed data from their trials.“We really do need to see the data, the full data set,” he said. “That data set needs to be made available to the FDA and to other scientists. President-elect Biden has said all along he’s going to let science lead the way, and so it’s critical that we are able to see that in a transparent way and the best recommendations from those scientists are made for the FDA, and then that information is carried forward to the American public.”Bright said it’s important to see if the full data set shows the vaccine to be safe and effective in people of all populations, because the early, interim data could just prove efficacy for a certain population.When asked whether the Trump administration’s “Operation Warp Speed” vaccine production program should get any credit for the speed with which vaccines have been developed, Bright instead credited investments in vaccine technology made under the Obama administration.Bright is the former director of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, the federal agency charged with overseeing the rapid production of a vaccine to fight the novel coronavirus. He filed a whistleblower complaint in May, alleging he was ousted because he resisted pressure to allow widespread use of hydroxychloroquine, the malaria drug that President Donald Trump was touting as treatment for COVID-19.Nov 17, 7:35 amSouth Australia quarantines 4,000 people amid growing cluster linked to medi-hotelAround 4,000 people in South Australia have been ordered to quarantine as the Australian state grapples with a fresh COVID-19 outbreak.South Australia authorities announced five new locally-transmitted cases on Tuesday, at least four of which were officially linked to a medi-hotel in the Parafield suburb of Adelaide, where travelers arriving from abroad are required to quarantine for 14 days. Authorities said the fifth case is expected to be connected to the Parafield cluster soon, which would bring the total number to 21.“All of these people have either no symptoms or they are very mildly symptomatic, and they have been picked up early in the course of the disease,” South Australia’s chief health officer, Prof. Nicola Spurrier, said at a press conference Tuesday.Those who have been advised to isolate are all close contacts of the cluster from the quarantine hotel and are being contacted daily by health authorities to check for symptoms. Meanwhile, at least five schools have been closed as contact tracers work to contain the outbreak, according to Spurrier.“We’ve decided to take a very, very cautious approach,” she told reporters, later adding that “this is a very, very worrying situation.”Thousands of people have been tested for COVID-19 in South Australia in recent days. Spurrier urged people to only get tested if they are symptomatic or if they have recently visited the areas of concern.“We do need to prioritize our testing across South Australia,” she said.There are currently 34 active infections in the state, including imported cases. The latest cluster is the first instance of community transmission in South Australia since April.“I need to reiterate to the people of South Australia that we are not out of the woods yet,” the state’s premier, Steven Marshall, said at Tuesday’s press conference. “We are just at the beginning stages of dealing with this particular very nasty cluster in Parafield. We are going to get through this. But we’re going to get through it with the cooperation of every single South Australian citizen.”Nov 17, 6:37 amAustria begins stricter lockdown amid rising casesAustrians awoke Tuesday morning with a new tough lockdown meant to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus.Under the stricter measures, which will remain in place through Dec. 6, people in Austria are only allowed to leave their homes to buy groceries, to go to work if their jobs are deemed essential, to exercise outside, to go to the doctor or to help people who need assistance.Schools across the Alpine nation have shuttered, as teaching will be done remotely during lockdown. Banks, basic food stores and pharmacies remain open but bars, hair salons, restaurants and other non-essential shops and services have been ordered closed.“All of social and public life will be brought down to a minimum,” Austrian Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said Monday, ahead of the new restrictions.It’s the second time since the start of the coronavirus pandemic that Austria has imposed a nationwide lockdown, amid rising infections across Europe. The Austrian Federal Ministry of Social Affairs, Health, Care and Consumer Protection has confirmed more than 208,000 cases of COVID-19 so far, including at least 1,741 deaths. Nearly 50,000 of those cases were reported in the past week alone.Nov 17, 5:09 amRussia registers 442 new deaths in all-time highRussia registered 442 deaths from COVID-19 in the last 24 hours, marking the country’s highest single-day death toll from the disease since the pandemic began.An additional 22,410 new cases of COVID-19 were also confirmed nationwide over the past day. Russia’s cumulative total now stands at 1,971,013 cases with 33,931 deaths, according to the country’s coronavirus response headquarters.Moscow remains the epicenter of the country’s outbreak and recent surge. More than a quarter of the newly confirmed cases — 5,882 — and nearly 17% of the new deaths — 74 — were reported in the capital, according to Russia’s coronavirus response headquarters.Despite the growing number of infections and deaths, Russian authorities have repeatedly said they have no plans to impose another nationwide lockdown.The Eastern European country of 145 million people has the fifth-highest tally of COVID-19 cases in the world, behind only the United States, India, Brazil and France, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.Nov 17, 4:17 amUS reports over 166K new casesThere were 166,045 new cases of COVID-19 confirmed in the United States on Monday, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.It’s the fourth day in a row that the country has reported over 150,000 newly diagnosed infections. Monday’s count is slightly less than the all-time high of 177,224 on Nov. 13.An additional 995 fatalities from COVID-19 were also registered nationwide on Monday, down from a peak of 2,609 new deaths on April 15.A total of 11,205,486 people in the United States have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 247,220 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.Much of the country was under lockdown by the end of March as the first wave of pandemic hit. By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 100,000 for the first time on Nov. 4.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Police Continue to Investigate Ocean City Cold Case

By on May 2, 2021

first_imgLaw enforcement continues to investigate a case that has remained unsolved for a decade.Monday marked the 10th anniversary of the disappearance of John Weisbecker from his home in the 200 block of Asbury Avenue in Ocean City.Weisbecker was last seen around 10:30 a.m. by a local postal worker. The investigation indicates that he disappeared shortly before noon.Evidence at the scene shows signs of a struggle and that Weisbecker did not leave of his own free will, police said.Weisbecker, who was described as a 6-feet 2-inches tall white male with blue eyes, had brown hair at the time of his disappearance, a brown mustache, and numerous tattoos on his torso and arms.The investigation is ongoing and being conducted by the Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office, FBI, Ocean City police and the New Jersey State Police.The public is encouraged to submit any information they feel may be important to this case. Information that once may have seemed insignificant could prove to be the missing element in solving this open case.Investigators are hoping that someone might remember a story or two that could help connect the dots, police said.The information may be submitted anonymously if desired. A reward of $50,000 has been offered to anyone providing information as to Weisbecker’s whereabouts.Anyone with information is asked to call one of the following numbers:Cape May County Major Crimes Unit           (609) 465-1135Ocean City Police Department                    (609) 399-9111Crime Stoppers Cape May County               (609) 465-2800FBI Newark Division                                   (973)792-3000   www.fbi.gov Missing persons poster for John Weisbecker of Ocean City from the Federal Bureau of Investigation.last_img read more

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Robert Johnson Documentary ‘Devil At The Crossroads’ Resurrects The Spirit Of A Real-Life Blues Myth [Review]

By on March 2, 2021

first_imgWhat do the Rolling Stones’ “Love in Vain,” Cream’s “Crossroads,” and the Blues Brothers’ “Sweet Home Chicago” have in common? Along with many more, these three blues standards were written by the most important musician whose name you might not recognize: Delta blues guitarist Robert Johnson.The latest in Netflix’s ReMastered series of original music documentaries, Devil at the Crossroads: A Robert Johnson Story, weaves the story of the mysterious bluesman together with the legacy of his influence. Brief but admirably thorough, the film is a must-see for rock fans searching to see how deep their genre really goes.Robert Johnson (1911-1938) was, by all accounts, a novice guitar player in early 1930s Mississippi—until he suddenly disappeared without a trace. A year later, he reappeared without explanation as an absolute blues prodigy, outplaying legends like Son House in juke joints around the Delta. The suspicious speed of Johnson’s improvement, mixed with the superstition that blues was the “Devil’s music,” led to the emergence of the now-famous legend: Johnson had gone down to a crossroads at midnight and sold his soul to the Devil in exchange for miraculous talent.During his short and tumultuous life, Johnson penned multiple blues standards, innovated a revolutionary guitar technique, and bent the Delta style by incorporating elements of vaudeville, ragtime, and folk music. Though he’s now considered one of the greatest blues musicians to ever live, Johnson remained quite unknown in his lifetime. He recorded only 29 distinct songs over two sessions in 1936 and 1937 before his murder in 1938 (he was allegedly poisoned by a jealous husband—what a way to go!). In the decades since, as documentation and subsequent reports emerged, researchers have been able to cobble together a partial account of Johnson and his life. This is the starting point for ReMastered: Devil at the Crossroads.Director Brian Oakes needed to take an old, gap-filled story and present it in an interesting and compelling way. To do this, the film leans heavily on animation, dramatized footage, and interview voiceovers. Initially, the animation appears an ill-fitted medium for a hundred-year-old story about the Delta blues, but it ends up doing a competent job of telling a story with few clear and credible details, much less actual video or photographic records. Among the interview subjects that the film uses to tell the story are Taj Mahal, Keith Richards, and a slew of cultural, musical, and historical academics. This is much to its benefit, as the use of a dramatic narrator might have cheapened the visual style. The animation and interview voiceover balance each other quite well in this way.In its focus on Johnson’s life story, the film falls short in its attention to the songs themselves, which remain tangential to the bluesman’s biography. Oakes does use several lyrics as jumping-off points to allow academics to give historical and cultural context, and top-notch audio engineering works overtime to push Johnson’s story forward and keep viewers engaged. Still, Oakes seems reluctant to allow any song to play for more than a few seconds before interrupting it. The result is that much of the music fades into a generic “Delta blues” soundtrack that misses opportunities to let certain songs breathe. It’s not always clear what you’re listening to, which would be a handicap on any music documentary. This complaint is largely preferential, as the film’s primary focus is on biographically exploring and conveying the life of Robert Johnson.Considering its short runtime of only 48 minutes, the film’s due emphasis on Johnson’s musical and cultural legacy is impressive. Supernatural or not, Johnson’s instrumental and songwriting talents revolutionized blues music and set the course for musical innovations that would ripple down through generations of musicians. Oakes traces Johnson’s legacy from Muddy Waters and the advent of electric blues to figures like Robert Plant, Jimi Hendrix, Bonnie Raitt, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, and other forebears of rock who cite Johnson’s influence.In the film, award-winning blues singer-songwriter Keb’ Mo’ says it best: “Robert Johnson wakes up the genius in everyone, and his music speaks to all of us.” Without Johnson’s music, it’s safe to say that rock music would likely be radically different today. But Johnson remains important culturally as well as musically: his tragic personal life, rambling ways, and prodigious talent epitomize many pillars of blues storytelling and form foundations for the narrative conventions of Beatnik and Americana culture. Ultimately, Johnson’s story continues through this dispersion, distortion, and evolution.With ReMastered: Devil at the Crossroads, Brian Oakes and Netflix deserve much credit for renewing public interest in Robert Johnson, as shown by an immediate spike of more than 300% in Google searches and a reinvigorated dialogue on social media. Netflix called upon Oakes to shed light on Johnson’s mysterious life, and his film does so with comprehension and style. Further, Oakes monumentalizes Johnson at the foot of a mountain of music made with his influence. This attention to the bluesman’s legacy means that Devil at the Crossroads will captivate fans of jazz, rock, country, pop, and beyond.It’s well known just how much music grew from the roots of the blues, but even origin stories need a beginning. For the blues, Robert Johnson is that beginning, and for his continuing influence, there’s no end in sight.Check out the trailer for the documentary below. You can watch ReMastered: Devil at the Crossroads: A Robert Johnson Story on Netflix here.ReMastered: Devil At The Crossroads – Official Trailer[Video: Netflix]last_img read more

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Hope for managing hospital admissions of COVID-19 cases

By on March 1, 2021

first_img ‘I thought: This is going to be interesting’ ‘Faster protection with less material’ Organized to fight the pandemic The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. How a new vaccine adjuvant might eventually help to shorten the race to COVID-19 immunity One College student adjusts to life on a deserted campus and another to being unexpectedly home a continent away President Bacow, now recovered, shares own experience having COVID-19 Related This is part of our Coronavirus Update series in which Harvard specialists in epidemiology, infectious disease, economics, politics, and other disciplines offer insights into what the latest developments in the COVID-19 outbreak may bring.Projected COVID-19 caseloads at the state’s largest health care system indicate that social-distancing measures have worked well enough that Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) will be able to avoid the kind of harrowing situation Northern Italy faced when a surge of patients outstripped the region’s ability to respond, a top emergency-preparedness physician said Thursday.Paul Biddinger, medical director for emergency preparedness at Partners Healthcare and vice chairman for emergency preparedness in Mass General’s Emergency Medicine Department, said the most recent modeling indicates the epidemic’s peak will stretch but not overwhelm the 1,000-bed hospital’s beds, staff, and equipment — in particular its supply of ventilators for patients who need help breathing.“Roughly about a week to two after the implementation and then strengthening of social distancing — physical distancing — instructions from the governor, from multiple mayors here in Eastern Massachusetts, we now have seen that our curve of arriving patients, both with general illness and critical illness, has decreased,” said Biddinger, who is also associate professor of emergency medicine at Harvard Medical School and visiting senior preparedness fellow at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.Biddinger said there are currently 220 to 230 COVID-19 patients at MGH, 110 of them in intensive care. The hospital has about 150 critical-care beds and the capacity to increase that to 300. Of the COVID-19 patients in those beds, more than 100 are on ventilators — all of the traditional devices the hospital has and roughly twice the number it regularly has in use. Biddinger said the hospital expects 200 critical-care patients at the epidemic’s peak, but has access to enough transport ventilators and anesthesia machines, which can perform the same function, to support the demand.“Now, for about a week or so, our data no longer looks as much as it did like a Northern Italian situation,” said BiddingerHe said modeling shows that the Boston region, where MGH and other Partners Healthcare facilities are located, is one to two weeks away from peak demand. The apex for intensive care would lag that by a few days, due to the extra time it takes for a case to become serious.Besides Mass. General, the Partners chain also includes Brigham and Women’s Hospital and several smaller and specialty facilities, such as McLean Hospital, Spaulding Rehab, Newton-Wellesley Hospital, and North Shore Medical Center.“We are cautiously optimistic that, with the numbers we are anticipating, we will have enough ventilators and we will have enough Intensive Care Unit spaces,” Biddinger said.Biddinger cautioned that anticipating a flattened peak does not mean the crisis is over. He said that MGH’s staff is holding up, though tired from the extraordinary effort. Some are anxious about the possibility of contracting the disease, but confidence in protective equipment and procedures will likely grow, barring a spike in health-care worker infections. Despite that anxiety, he said there’s also a sense of purpose that is apparent when he walks the halls and realizes how the facility and its people have responded to the challenge.“You can really feel the mission, especially on these floors that have been turned into ICU spaces,” Biddinger said. “You might think people are overwhelmed or scared, and it’s exactly the opposite. It’s extraordinary. A lot of people do feel proud to be able to take care of patients during this time.”The COVID preparations extend throughout the Partners Healthcare system, Biddinger said, including places like the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, which has loaned staff and bed space to MGH next door. If there are available beds in the Partners system, they will be made available to other hospitals should they reach capacity.“We’ve done an extraordinary amount of work. Hundreds and hundreds of people have done yeoman’s work to open up new ICU spaces, to move ventilators around, to come up with contingency plans, to work exceptionally hard … to help us be in the position we’re in,” Biddinger said. “There are many, many more weeks of hard work ahead of us.” To stem the coronavirus crisis, Harvard Medical School scientists forge ahead on six key fronts The way we live nowlast_img read more

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Au Bon Pain to open in library

By on January 26, 2021

first_imgHungry students will no longer make a “LaFun run” to refuel during late-night study marathons in the Hesburgh Library now that Au Bon Pain will open on the library’s first floor in November.   The café will supplant the vending machines in the first floor lounge, which have been relocated to the basement lobby. Associate Director of Retail and Food Services Administration Mark King said the addition of Au Bon Pain will satisfy the cravings of a large portion of the Notre Dame community. “Au Bon Pain is a bakery, fresh sandwiches, soups and salads place very similar to Panera Bread,” King said. “Au Bon Pain actually created Panera Bread … a lot of people on campus want Panera Bread but we aren’t a big enough market to warrant a Panera Bread – this way we are able to satisfy that group of people without duplicating anything we already had on campus.” The continual product development and variety at Au Bon Pain will add to the café’s appeal, King said.   “They have a coffee/barista station, a plain coffee station, a smoothie section, sandwich section, premade sandwiches and salads, breakfasts and oatmeal served in the morning, and different soups that are appealing and different,” King said. “The menu will change periodically as well, with seasonal salads and soups and fresh baked goods.” Michael Davy, Food Services administration continuous improvement manager and future manager of the library’s Au Bon Pain, said he suspects the café will receive a lot of foot traffic. “I think people will come and try what’s offered at the café because people want to experience something a little different,” Davy said. “We’ll hit traditional meal periods, and outside of traditional meal periods students that use the library will be able to stop by and get a sandwich, use our full espresso coffee or smoothie programs or get a late night snack.” Hesburgh Library Facilities Manager Ross Ferguson said a joint team of Food Services staff and Hesburgh Library staff concluded Au Bon Pain was the best option for the library. “A committee of five of us met with Food Services to discuss Au Bon Pain and other local and national options,” Ferguson said.  “Au Bon Pain we could get going by November, but the other options would push us back to 2013.” Davy said Food Services looked for a restaurant that would compliment the other eateries on campus, fit in the available physical space and satisfy consumers. “A few factors in the decision were the quality of the menu’s offerings, the corporate franchise support and uniqueness of the new café – there’s not one in the immediate area,” Davy said. “Primarily though, the biggest thing was the quality of the food.” The focus at Au Bon Pain is on producing fresh food, Davy said. “One of the interesting quality principles of Au Bon Pain Corporation is that any prepackaged item that’s made for sale in a to-go container is made for sale that day, on that day,” Davy said. “You can get made-to-order things, but nothing is held over to the next day… that speaks to the quality principles of the franchise.” The café will even make nutritional information readily accessible, Davy said. “We will have a nutritional kiosk where any customer can use a touch screen to find out the nutritional components of any of the menu items in the store,” hy said. King said Au Bon Pain’s structure will work well with the café’s planned schedule. “Au Bon Pain’s concept has the ability to expand and contract based on the [consumer] volume, which is very convenient,” King said.  “This enables the café to act as an accordion: there are going to be busy times and slow times, especially because we’re looking at being open for a very long time([7 a.m. to 1 a.m ]. At the times with less traffic fresh sandwiches probably won’t be offered.” Ferguson said he did some personal research to test how well-suited the first floor of the library would be for Au Bon Pain. “We wanted to see how many people were walking by that location in order to show that this was a viable place for the café,” Ferguson said.  “I watched the number of people passing one mornin, and counted 72 people coming in from the parking lot, most of them with coffee in their hands.” Many student concerns revolved around the accessibility of the future café, Ferguson said. “We feel that a large percentage of the students want places open, that they feel there are not enough places open on campus [that late]… the café going in, courtyard being finished and fishbowl renovation all go into the big picture plan,” Ferguson said. The affordable price point Au Bon Pain offers made it an attractive choice, Ferguson said. It doesn’t make sense to bring in a big fancy place that [students] can’t afford,” Ferguson said.  “DomersDollars, fresh food, healthy choices: that’s what the students asked for.” Senior Tyler Bartlow said he thinks students will appreciate the café’s accessibility.   “It will be great to have a food option within the library when I’m studying,” Bartlow said. Senior Ashlee Hunt said she is looking forward to the addition of an eatery to the library. “I don’t know what it is but I’m excited for food to be in the library, especially relatively inexpensive, healthy food,” Hunt said. King said the café will open in November. “We’re shooting for a November 12 opening date, but that’s contingent on construction getting done,” King said.   It will be interesting to open it up during a football week, but that will help us give it a big kick-off.”last_img read more

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Art display aims to bring positivity to campus

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first_imgAs the days get shorter and colder, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures is trying to spread positivity around campus with a new creative art display between DeBartolo and O’Shaughnessy Halls. The exhibit is called “Romance Rocks” and consists of rocks decorated with words written in foreign languages of positivity and encouragement to students, faculty and other passersby. Emma Farnan | The Observer The “Romance Rocks” display, located between DeBartolo and O’Shaughnessy Halls. The display was organized by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and is meant to send a message of positivity to passing pedestrians.Sara Nunley, the undergraduate studies coordinator in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the person who organized the display, said “Romance Rocks” is meant to combat negativity in the community.“We basically are spreading kindness and encouragement across campus to all students,” Nunley said. “I feel like sometimes things can be so negative that we want positivity and stuff to be spread.”The rocks were created by about 500 students currently enrolled in beginning and intermediate level romance language courses. The rocks include words and phrases written in Italian, French, Spanish and Portuguese. In addition to the positive message, the display is also intended to be a creative way for passing pedestrians to engage with foreign languages.Shauna Williams, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures’ director of undergraduate studies, helped orchestrate the display. Williams noted the religious aspect of the art. “It lines up really well, as a Catholic University, with our Catholic mission of inclusion and diversity and celebrating differences,” she said.The display is also designed to bring an artistic change of pace to students in language courses, Nunley explained.“I’ve heard a lot from faculty that most students really enjoyed it,” she said. “Just taking a break from their normal routine in class, to just have like a breather you know and just do something fun and creative.”“Romance Rocks” is now beginning its second week on display and is scheduled to be cleared by Friday. Community members and language students will help clean up the display. The display’s first week, Williams explained, was designed to draw attention to the art.“We wanted it on display for two weeks,” she said. “One week so people could just walk by and notice it, especially since this weekend we had a home football game, we had a home hockey game, a home women’s basketball game and a home women’s volleyball game.”During the display’s second week, Nunley said community members are encouraged to pick up the rocks and share them.“This is the week that you’re to take one for yourself or share one with a friend,” she said.  Though Nunley organized and brought the project to Notre Dame, “Romance Rocks” is inspired by the Kindness Rocks Project, founded by Megan Murphy. Murphy is a “Women’s Empowerment Coach, Business Mentor, Kindness Activist, Meditation Instructor and Lecturer,” according to the Project’s website.Williams said the rocks themselves also communicate an important message about the longevity of positive thinking.“What do rocks even symbolize? Its something thats a little, you know, enduring and lasting through centuries,” she said. “They kind of have this other meaning of durability and long-lasting perseverance.”Tags: Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, positivity, Romance Rockslast_img read more

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Audra’s Back on Broadway! Lady Day Begins Previews

By on January 18, 2021

first_imgWe wished on the moon, and it’s finally coming true. Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill begins performances on Broadway March 25, with five-time Tony winner Audra McDonald headlining as blues legend Billie Holiday. The show will play a limited ten-week engagement at the Circle in the Square Theatre with an official opening on April 13. The bio-show, written by Lanie Robertson and directed by Lonny Price, leaves audiences witness to one of the last performances of Holiday’s lifetime. Set in a small Philadelphia bar in 1959, Lady Day recounts Holiday’s life through the songs that made her famous. McDonald will perform 18 numbers as the late singer, including “What a Little Moonlight Can Do,” “Tain’t Nobody’s Biz-ness” and “God Bless the Child.” Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill debuted off-Broadway in 1986 starring Lonette McKee and has been produced around the country and internationally ever since. Tony and Grammy winner Dee Dee Bridgewater starred in another show, entitled just Lady Day, off-Broadway that closed earlier this year. Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill Audra McDonald Star Files View Comments Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 5, 2014last_img read more

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