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Beyond mourning

By on March 1, 2021

first_img <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BpwnjYqbqDI” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/BpwnjYqbqDI/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Alma Guillermoprieto wandered a drought-stricken town in El Salvador, cattle carcasses poking from the dirt. “It was so poor, so poor, so poor,” she says with a wince, telling the story now.Guillermoprieto’s visit was prompted by the discovery on Aug. 25, 2010, of the bodies of 72 migrant workers, men and women hailing mostly from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador who had been heading north to the United States through Mexico, along a stretch of railroad known as la bestia — the beast.News of the massacre sent chills around the world, reinforcing notions of chaos and terror in Mexico.In El Salvador, Guillermoprieto found the family of one of the 14 women among the victims, discovering that many of her kin, and many from her small and impoverished village, had perished along la bestia. Guillermoprieto, a Mexican-born journalist, author, and former Radcliffe Institute fellow, recalled asking the woman’s 13-year-old relative if he, too, would make the dangerous trek northward. He said yes.“You can talk at them until you’re blue in the face,” said Guillermoprieto. “It’s a terrible thing for a young man or young woman to be sitting in one of these villages with no opportunity. What else are they going to do?”Travelers in Hiding: Telling a Story of Central Americans in Mexico Video of Alma Guillermoprieto RI ’07 delivering the Schlesinger Library’s 2012–2013 Maurine and Robert Rothschild Lecture.Guillermoprieto returned to Radcliffe on Tuesday to deliver the Schlesinger Library’s 2012-13 Maurine and Robert Rothschild Lecture, with a focus on the still-unsolved mass murder, believed to be connected to Mexico’s ongoing drug war, which has claimed more than 50,000 lives.Men and women daily risk their lives for la bestia, leaping onto a passing train car for a ride that, they hope, may usher them to a better life. Some die trying, or lose limbs; others make the jump but are assaulted, sometimes sexually, along the route, only to then face corruption among authorities at the border. The threat of cartel violence is an added danger to the already treacherous journey.Although she continues to write about problems plaguing Latin America in venues such as The New Yorker and The New York Review of Books, Guillermoprieto said that after learning of the 72 murders, her first impulse was to keep her distance. “I’d written enough similar horror stories,” she told the crowd.Guillermoprieto envisioned an altar like those built for Día de los Muertos, the Mexican day of remembrance for the dead. “A true altar de muertos,” she explained, “is a site where we bring the dead back to life by talking about them, letting them know that we haven’t forgotten, letting them know that they’re welcome back into our home.”But, she noted, “being that the dead in Mexico are so numerous that they’ve become statistics … there was no way I could talk or write about each of the 72 migrants myself, so the answer of an online virtual altar imposed itself as the only practical solution.”72migrantes.com was born. Guillermoprieto sent out an international call, and writers near and far chimed in, each choosing a migrant to write about. Pictures arrived  — some of the murdered migrants, others of la bestia, men and women pooled on the tops of pummeling train cars. Artists donated songs, as singing is a traditional component of Día de los Muertos, as is preparing the dead’s favorite foods. That would obviously be a problem on an online platform, so Guillermoprieto began taking online donations, which are directly funneled to a priest-run migrant shelter in the southern state of Chiapas. The shelter is a necessary pit stop for migrants in need of a good meal before embarking on their voyage.Additional help comes from las patronas, kind strangers along la bestia who are often just as poor as the fleeing migrants, said Guillermoprieto. Las patronas work without funding and out of sheer kindness, making tortillas and tacos and stuffing them into plastic bags. Daily, they walk to the tracks and wait to throw the bags of tacos to the blurred migrants aboard the fast-moving train.The online altar has multiplied in many ways, Guillermoprieto said. It’s inspired theater productions, books, and, last year, on the first anniversary of the massacre, Radio UNAM, the station of Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, presented a dramatic reading by famous actors of the site’s testimonials.“Perhaps this is the main reason why the altar in its various manifestations has lasted so long,” said Guillermoprieto, “because they’re proof that Mexico still is a country where, against all the odds, acts of generosity and decency and solidarity and inspiration remain not only possible but constant, so the altar has become a place of encouragement, and not just of mourning.”last_img read more

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Harmful, untested chemicals rife in personal care products

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first_imgIn the United States, the average person is exposed to more than a hundred chemicals from cosmetics, soaps, and other personal care products before leaving the house in the morning. While people may assume these products are safe, their chemical ingredients are mostly untested and largely unregulated, with even known carcinogenic and endocrine disrupting chemicals still found in some formulations. What’s more, ingredient labels can be misleading, leaving even the savviest consumers in the dark about the safety of the products they use every day.“The lipstick we wear, the food we eat, and the soap we use to clean our children’s hands often contain harmful chemicals,” said Mia Davis, head of health and safety for the personal care product company BeautyCounter. “The load adds up quickly day after day. And as we swallow, breathe in, and lather up, toxins entering our bodies may have lasting impact.”Davis delivered her talk, “Toxic Trespass: Harmful & Untested Chemicals in Everyday Products,”  to a Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) audience on February 6, 2014.Chemical exposure has been linked to rising rates in breast cancer, asthma, autism, reproductive problems, and other health issues, Davis said. Many chemicals in personal care products have never been tested for safety, and may also accumulate and interact in potentially harmful ways. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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New Cushwa-Leighton Library 24-hour study space completed, Le Mans tunnel expected to re-open

By on January 26, 2021

first_imgThe new 24-hour study space in the lower level of Cushwa-Leighton Library will officially open Friday, library director Joe Thomas announced in a campus-wide email Wednesday. The space was completed over winter break, Thomas said in the email.“This space was designed with current students’ needs in mind and is aimed to promote collaborative work, whiteboarding, and the use of technology — both shared and personal devices,” he said. “Outlets and charging stations abound.”Other improvements made to the library over winter break include two new hydration stations, a new free coffee machine on the main floor and Keurig vending options provided on the lower level. Additionally, classroom furniture samples are available for student testing, “specifically intended as replacements to older tablet desks found in classrooms across campus.”Later this semester, the ResNet and IT Helpdesk will relocate to the lower level of the library, near the 24-hour study space, Thomas said, in an attempt to make their services more accessible to students.Additionally, plans are in place to re-open the tunnels linking Le Mans Hall and the library, Thomas said.“Work has begun to make the Le Mans-Library tunnel accessible, including the installation of a lift and a ramp,” he said. “While it won’t be in time to spare [students] from this year’s snow, the work will be complete within the next three months. As soon as it’s signed off for use, we will open it for you all.”In the same email, Thomas announced that munch money may now be used to make purchases from all campus vending machines.“We hope that this improves your experience on campus,” Thomas said.Tags: 24-hour study space, Cushwa-Leighton Library, free coffee, Le Mans Hall, library renovations, tunnelslast_img read more

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London Datebook: Bat Boy Flies, The West End’s Breakdown & More

By on January 18, 2021

first_imgA new year always brings with it promise in abundance, especially for the London theater scene, which Is already kicking into gear. From the latest British reworking of a Broadway musical to an eagerly awaited new play from arguably the greatest living British playwright, January offers a mouth-watering feast of possibilities. ALSO: Nina Raine’s play Tribes was a long-running success off-Broadway, but the English author this month turns director to steer her brother Moses Raine’s play Donkey Heart to the Trafalgar Studios downstairs space for a three-week run opening January 8. The same night sees the first preview at the Young Vic for the London premiere of Bull, Mike Bartlett’s short, sharp piece about gender and power politics in the workplace that has played Sheffield and New York but never London—until now. JANUARY 12-18 Revisiting the Verge: Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown got a sniffy response in some quarters in 2010 when the Pedro Almodovar film was conceived as a Broadway musical. So the director Bartlett Sher is using its West End premiere, opening January 12 at the Playhouse Theatre, as a chance to reconsider the material from scratch, which means some new songs from composer David Yazbek and a cast featuring Olivier winner Tamsin Greig Tony nominee Haydn Gwynne and Wicked alum Willemijn Verkaik. ALSO: James McAvoy reteams with director Jamie Lloyd for a rare revival of The Ruling Class, Peter Barnes’s play about a paranoid schizophrenic that is best-known to many from the 1972 Peter O’Toole film. Opening night is January 27 on the Trafalgar Studios mainstage. The night before sees a gala concert performance at the Palace Theatre of Stephen Sondheim and Hugh Wheeler’s ever-glorious A Little Night Music, with an all-star cast headed by Anne Reid, Janie Dee, Jamie Parker and Joanna Riding. JANUARY 5-11 A Batty Revival: The cult off-Broadway musical Bat Boy got a big-deal West End outing in 2004 and here it is in a new off-West End production opening January 14 at the Southwark Playhouse. Rob Compton takes the title role amid a notably high-powered creative team that includes Tony nominee Lauren Ward as the title character’s adoptive mother and Tony nominee Joey McKneely on hand as choreographer. ALSO: Robert Hastie’s revival of the late Kevin Elyot’s beautiful and heartbreaking play My Night with Reg was one of the top productions of 2014, and now it gets a West End upgrade, opening January 23 at the Apollo Theatre, with its starry Donmar cast intact. Final pre-opening week of previews at the Theatre Royal Haymarket of the West End transfer from Chichester of Taken at Midnight, Mark Hayhurst’s play about the mother of the German lawyer who famously put Hitler on the witness stand; Downton Abbey’s Penelope Wilton stars.center_img JANUARY 19-25 Crossing the Pond: The director Michael Longhurst is currently bringing a London hit to renewed life on Broadway with Constellations, starring Jake Gyllenhaal and Ruth Wilson. And scarcely does that production open in New York before he is back in London directing the West End premiere of an off-Broadway hit—Joshua Harmon’s Bad Jews, opening January 21 at the St. James Theatre. Ilan Goodman (son of the protean actor Henry Goodman) and Jenna Augen head the cast. View Comments ALSO: First preview January 15 of Dominic Dromgoole’s production at Shakespeare’s Globe of the classic play The Changeling, which returns the blissful Hattie Morahan to the London stage following her acclaimed New York run as Nora in the Young Vic production of A Doll’s House. A familiar New York name in his own right, author Will Eno brings his solo play Title and Deed to west London’s Print Room, opening January 16; Conor Lovett once again makes up the cast of one. JANUARY 26 –FEBRUARY 1 Sir Tom’s Time: It’s been more than eight years since Tom Stoppard’s last new play, Rock ‘n’ Roll, which stormed Broadway and the West End, so interest is doubly keen in the acclaimed scribe’s latest venture, The Hard Problem, opening January 28 in the National’s new Dorfman auditorium. Telling of a young psychology researcher at a brain-science institute, the play is directed by Nicholas Hytner in his last production before exiting the helm of the National this spring. His former Desdemona in Othello, Olivia Vinall, takes the central role.last_img read more

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Martha Maksym named named executive director of United Way

By on January 1, 2021

first_imgDon Rendall of Green Mountain Power Corporation and the President of the Board of Directors of the United Way of Chittenden County announced today that Martha Maksym of Grand Isle has been named the new Executive Director to succeed Gretchen Morse who announced her retirement effective June 30th.  A wide range of applicants was considered by a search committee of the Board during a process that took several months. Rendall said, ‘We reviewed over sixty applications and interviewed a pool of candidates that were impressive and capable.  Martha has the ideal combination of skills, experience and commitment to the health and well being of the people of Chittenden County.  We are thrilled with the choice and feel confident that her proven success at convening multiple stakeholders to solve community problems, along with her over twenty years of health and human service nonprofit management and administration experience, makes her the ideal person to assume United Way’s top leadership position.’ A graduate of the University of Vermont with a Masters Degree in Public Administration, Maksym has held a number of senior management positions at United Way over the last 17 years and is currently the Director of Community Investments.  In that position she provides direction and management of the organization’s volunteer funds distribution process and community investment strategies that align with United Way’s impact focus on education, income and health.  She also serves as Diversity Officer for United Way, overseeing the implementation of a Diversity Strategic Plan.  Maksym currently chairs the Board of Leadership Champlain and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Lake Champlain Regional Chamber of Commerce. She is a graduate of the Leadership Champlain Program and the Vermont Leadership Institute of the Snelling Center for Government. She is also a member of the Boards of both the Vermont Health Foundation and Hunger Free Vermont.When she accepted the position, Maksym said, ‘I am deeply honored to have been chosen to serve our community in this capacity. We all are well served by a committed network of human services providers. The relationship between United Way and our community partners is long standing and strong, and I look forward to continuing our work together to improve lives in Chittenden County.’ Maksym will assume her new position on July 1.last_img read more

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The Current State of N.C.’s Honey Bees

By on December 30, 2020

first_imgAnd still, honey bees continue to give. Honey bees make their own kind of gold called propolis, which can be extracted from the hive to combat allergies and soothe aching joints. And, of course, raw local honey has tremendous antimicrobial properties that can boost the immune system and support the gut.  Tarpy reminds all who are able, “support local beekeeping communities, beekeepers are on the front lines of this issue”. If you want to jump in on the action, round up your fellow honey bee enthusiasts to keep our state insect thriving.  The emergence of the Varroa mite has become a formidable assassin that wreaks havoc on the microbiome of honey bees. But there is hope for a counterattack against this parasite as scientists are developing a bacterial treatment for the bees.  Various states from coast to coast have already implemented laws, many establishing habitat protection, outlawing certain pesticides, or raising awareness for beekeeping. On the federal level, there are few regulations that safeguard honey bees, but as of January 2020, the EPA is working to move legislation forward that outlaws a number of pesticides and neonicotinoids that harm bee populations.  Photo of bee collecting pollen courtesy of Getty Images “Understand what is a honey bee and what is not a honey bee and what is a wasp or beneficial bee.” says Tarpy, “provide habitat for all bees, plant pollen and nectar-bearing plants-things that bloom throughout the year, especially through the height of the summer. Honey bees love zinnias!”  Neonicotinoids directly impact the nervous system, resulting in nerve synapse damage and paralysis to unsuspecting insects and pollinators who come in contact with treated plant parts. In one respect, researchers argue that simply following bottle labels of neonicotinoid products is “safe” and will not likely result in any environmental threat, yet thirteen countries as of 2018 have banned neonicotinoids. As to the bill addressing this dangerous compound, the effort was short-lived as the bill failed to be heard in the Senate and House committees. Any further legislation must be done at the 2021 session.  Luckily, honey bees do have human cheerleaders. In 2019, Senators Mike Woodard (D), Valerie Foushee (D), Natasha Marcus (D), and Mujtaba Mohammed (D) of North Carolina’s Senate, sponsored a bill called The Pollinator Protection Act (S496). The bill demanded more restrictions on insecticides, called neonicotinoids.  Yet, honey bee populations are taking a sharp decline that’s raising concern from environmentalists, bee lovers, farmers, and economists alike. There are an estimated 2.9 million honey bee colonies across America. North Carolina is home to up to 120,000 of those colonies. Since 2018, the national honey bee population has been reduced by 40 percent and will remain under fire without addressing the culprits of these bee deaths.  Yet, the more pressing matters originate from man-made threats to the honey bees. There are major factors that are contributing to the decline, the first of which being the ever-popular use of pesticides. Farmers who spray pesticides on their crops are exposing all bees, not just honey bees, to harmful chemicals that are toxic to their bodies. Just one incident of pesticide exposure: decimation. Entire colonies are gone in as little as 24 hours, bee skeletons hitting the ground like raindrops. Near constant habitat destruction continues to decrease access to food sites and fragment honey bee colonies, forcing a search for new sources of nectar, thus leading to migration elsewhere.  Dr. David Tarpy, professor of entomology and plant pathology at NC State University and extension apiculturist, explains that although the honey bee population, or any bee species for that matter, falls in the winter, the colonies will “regenerate” in the spring as new bees are born into the hive.  If you want to get involved and help protect the honey bees, you can do so in whatever means that you are capable of. Writing your local lawmakers, growing bee-friendly plants in your garden, or simply raising awareness for honey bee importance, protection, and celebration can spark change. We could all benefit from Dr. Tarpy’s suggestion of remaining “api-curious”, which is a friendly invitation to learn how to differentiate between bee species and understand how to support the honey bee.  Honey bees are a keystone species, playing a significant role in the survival of a wide range of Earth’s flora and fauna. These bees are blessings and play a significant role in the survival of so many of Earth’s creatures. When you want to know if your local area is thriving, look for the honey bee. Our little busy neighbors do more than just pollinate your backyard gardens, they can indicate the health of an entire ecosystem.  There’s a distant buzz, then a whizz overhead. Finally, it comes into view as it lands on a blossoming flower. It’s a honey bee hard at work, collecting pollen from the plants and wildflowers that line the trail. You watch as it meticulously gathers the precious yellow dust, tucks it behind its knees, and bustles over to the next source.  These little workers can increase the nutritional density of foods as they transfer pollen from one plant species to another. This also leads to providing food for farm animals and other critters that thrive on foraging for plant life. In order to allow for new growth, plants depend on honey bee pollination to produce seeds, which sprout forth in the ovule of the plant once pollen comes in contact with the stigma. Forest regeneration is also supported through this process and is one of the most honorable services a honey bee performs for our planet.  Unfortunately, this does not take away from the looming attacks from human and environmental sources. For those who take a special interest in honey bees and preserving their existence, Tarpy suggests starting with the basics. Honey bees, like most other bees, take responsibility for pollinating our farmland and other vegetation. Pollinator dependent crops rely on bees to gather pollen from flowering infant plants in order to reproduce. Many of these plants, such as cotton, apples, and blueberries, are major cash crops in North Carolina’s economy and most commonly fall under honey bee jurisdiction since these plants are native to the bee’s habitat. last_img read more

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Are credit unions the hipster FI?

By on December 17, 2020

first_imgThe nation’s first credit union (CU) was founded in 1908 to serve mill workers in the Manchester, New Hampshire area. Today, more than a century later, that credit union is still operational and is now focused on serving a new type of member: millennials.The latest PYMNTS Credit Union Tracker™, powered by CO-OP Financial Services, features news on the latest regulation changes facing the credit union market, along with recent partnerships and innovations that are changing how credit unions conduct their lending practices.News from the credit union marketRecent rule changes and product innovations are promising to help the CU market better serve its members.Some big-name credit union service organizations (CUSOs) applauded the Trump administration’s recent move to roll back the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau (CFPB)’s arbitration rule that the groups said was unfair to credit unions. Both the Credit Union National Association (CUNA) and the National Association of Federally-Insured Credit Unions (NAFCU) said the now-repealed rule, which prevented FIs from using mandatory arbitration agreements in financial services contracts, put an unfair burden on the industry. continue reading » 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Indonesia confirms its 60th H5N1 case

By on November 18, 2020

first_imgAug 23, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Indonesia has confirmed its 60th human case of H5N1 avian influenza, this one in a 6-year-old girl who is recovering, the World Health Organization (WHO) said today.The girl is from Bekasi, a city southeast of Jakarta in West Java, not part of the Cikelet subdistrict, where several recent cases and suspected cases sparked concern about possible human-to-human transmission.The girl became ill Aug 6 and was hospitalized Aug 11 but is improving, the WHO said. Bloomberg News reported today that she was in Sulianti Saroso Hospital in Jakarta.The Bloomberg story said dead chickens had been seen in the girl’s neighborhood, but the WHO said only that the source of her infection is under investigation.Forty-six of the 60 H5N1 cases in Indonesia have been fatal, for a 77% case-fatality rate. The WHO’s global H5N1 case count is 241 cases with 141 deaths, for a case-fatality rate of 59%.Test results are awaited in another suspected H5N1 case in Indonesia, involving a 35-year-old woman from Simalungun regency in North Sumatra province, according to Bloomberg. The health minister said the woman fell ill Aug 21.In other news, a World Bank official said Indonesia needs an estimated $120 million a year to vaccinate chickens and compensate farmers for culling, but its vaccine budget covers only 10% of that amount, according to the Bloomberg report. The official, Louise F. Scura, made the statements at a meeting between the Indonesian government and donor countries.See also:Aug 23 WHO statementhttp://www.who.int/csr/don/2006_08_23/en/index.htmllast_img read more

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Grateful to board support of veterans

By on October 20, 2020

first_imgWith its action, the Scotia-Glenville School District joins with Niskayuna and Mohonasen school districts in providing this recognition and benefit to its veterans.We believe that all communities throughout Schenectady County value and desire to help their veterans. We look forward to the Schalmont school district, Schenectady City School District and Duanesburg Central school district adopting the Alternative Veterans’ Exemption.Robert J. SerottaPatricia MontoneSchenectadyThe writers are, respectively, commander and Auxiliary commander. The letter was signed by Greg Melita, Adjutant; Walter Schlegel, Sgt.-at-Arms; James Bleser, treasurer and Kurt von Maucher, chaplain.More from The Daily Gazette:Motorcyclist injured in Thursday afternoon Schenectady crashTroopers: Schenectady pair possessed heroin, crack cocaine in Orange County Thruway stopSchenectady department heads: Budget cutbacks would further stress already-stretched departmentsSchenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcySchenectady police reform sessions pivot to online Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion The members of Lt. Vibert O. Fryer, Chapter 88 of the Disabled American Veterans and our Auxiliary, wish to thank the Scotia-Glenville school board for its recent actions and the adoption of the Alternative Veterans’ Exemption.We are also grateful for the veterans and community members who showed up for school board meetings and public hearings to express their overwhelming support for veterans. The Scotia-Glenville community clearly showed that it supports and respects its veterans and men and women currently serving in the Armed Forces of the United States.last_img read more

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Portsmouth society applies for Tricorn spot-listing

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