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Flying Lotus And Anderson .Paak Get Animated In Sci-Fi-Themed Video For “More” [Watch]

By on March 2, 2021

first_imgFlying Lotus has shared the colorful new video for “More”, his recent collaboration with Anderson .Paak. The video sees Flying Lotus teaming up with director Shinichiro Watanabe to produce a futuristic sci-fi storyline where the two artists step into an animated world of alien robots with built-in turntables and psychedelic space exploration.Related: Flying Lotus Releases “Spontaneous”, “Takashi” Off Forthcoming ‘Flamagra’ LPThe video features Flying Lotus as an astronaut who has crashed onto a desolate planet, only to stumble upon a robotic DJ, filling in for .Paak’s presence on the hip-hop track. The video presents a visual masterpiece as Watanabe and his team provides viewers with an abundance of lush color schemes and psychedelic animation styles as the song plays throughout. Watch the entire new video below.Flying Lotus – “More” (feat. Anderson .Paak) [Video: Flying Lotus]Flying Lotus (real name, Steven Ellison) and Watanabe had also recently collaborated for a film short titled Blade Runner: Black Out 2022, for which Ellison had curated the soundtrack.“More” will be included in the mix of recordings featured on Flying Lotus’ forthcoming Flamagra LP, due out on May 24th via Warp. Speaking of new albums, Anderson .Paak also released his own new collection of songs just last month with the arrival of Ventura on April 12th.Fans can catch Flying Lotus live, even in 3D at some shows, as part of his 2019 summer tour schedule. Fans can head to his website for tickets and tour info.last_img read more

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Luminaries Podcast Episode 29: Complete the World’s Toughest Endurance Yacht Race…With Rugged Tech

By on February 27, 2021

first_imgWhere can technology take your business? Join hosts Mark Schaefer and Douglas Karr on an IT transformation expedition. Listen in as they have in-depth conversations with technology luminaries who clear the path for your business growth – hear from analysts, partners, your peers and leaders across Dell Technologies. Find research, best practices and tools to make your IT transformation real.In this excerpt from Luminaries—Talking to the Brightest Minds in Tech, hosts Mark Schaefer and Douglas Karr speak with Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, (referred to as SIR JOHN, below), Founder and Chairman of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race and the first person to sail solo non-stop around the world.So tell us a little bit about the Clipper RaceSIR JOHN: Well, the Clipper Race, it’s an idea I got, I was up in Greenland mountaineering with a friend of mine, and he told me how much it cost him to climb Mount Everest. And it seemed an awful lot of money. And I thought, well, now, what’s the sailing equivalent? And I came to the conclusion it was a circumnavigation.And I thought, well, heck, there must be a load of people out there who’d love to do that, but don’t have enough confidence or not enough money to buy a boat. Supposing I supplied a boat and training and, you know, all the backups needed and offered it, how much would that cost? I worked it out on the back of an envelope, and it came to about half what it cost to climb Mount Everest. So, I met up with William Ward, and we put an advert in the papers saying we were planning on doing this, and got 8,000 answers.Once you’ve launched an idea like that, if you don’t do it, someone else will. So, we said, right, we’d better go ahead with this. So, in 11 months, we built eight boats. We recruited people, skippers, trained up the crews, and arranged a route around the world and started the first race. And really, the race is open to ordinary people who just want to go out there and do something extraordinary with their lives.So, we say to them, look, you don’t have to have any sailing experience, we’ll train you. In fact, I have to say, in many cases, the people who’ve never sailed before, easiest to train. They haven’t got any bad habits. But so, we train them up, and we put on the boats, and with professional skippers. And then we run a race around the world, calling at various places along the way.Now, we’ve been doing this for 23 years now, and we’ve taken some 5,000 people. Really given them an experience of a lifetime. And it’s fascinating to watch how they change. You know, the 18-year-old, a year later, is 24 in maturity terms. But even the chief executive of a company, who’s 60, comes back just standing that little bit taller. They’ve taken on nature in the raw, and they’ve looked it in the eye and they’ve survived it. They’ve something to be proud of.Sir John, of course this is a podcast about technology and digital transformation. Can you tell us what the onboard communication technology was like when you circumnavigated the globe in 1994?SIR JOHN: Well, Douglas, in fact, the first time I went around the world was 1968, ’69. And that was non-stop. And of course, one very simple thing you’ll recognize immediately, no satellites. So, there was no GPS. There was no satellite communication. We used single-side band radios, very low-powered. If you could get through, it was a miracle. But after two and a half months, mine broke down anyway. So, for the next eight months, I had no communication.So yeah, that was quite funny, because when I got back after passing New Zealand, where I saw some fishermen, no one heard anything of me for four and a half months, until I ran into some ships off the Azores. I remember a lady coming up to me and saying, weren’t you worried when you were missing? I said, madam, I knew exactly where I was.So, talk about the technology today, because it’s quite different. And you have this partnership with Dell, and this Rugged computer system that they’re providing to you. So, talk a little bit about the importance of technology today. And you know, you’ve talked quite a bit about the training and the safety. And it seems like technology plays a big role in all of that for the sailors of today.SIR JOHN: Well, you’re absolutely right. I mean, we have to move with the times. We have to accept what’s available to us. Our boats typically have three different satellite systems on them now. So, I can be anywhere in the world and call them up wherever they are. It doesn’t matter. Middle of the Pacific, middle of the Atlantic, I can get straight through to them on my mobile phone.This is a big safety thing, of course, but it’s a bit more than that, because we’ve got GPS, we’ve got satellite systems, we’ve got plotters. We’ve got our computers, which are fundamental to making these systems work. So, if you don’t have a good computer, you can’t work them. And then, of course, the next thing is you had a boat that’s rolling around, being smashed about a bit, water everywhere. You’ve got to have a tough computer, because otherwise they just don’t last.I mean, there were times in the past when we’ve probably renewed all the computers during the course of a race because they’ve just collapsed. And glad to say that’s no longer the case. But it was the case in the past.That’s just amazing. And when you really think about it, it’s amazing how this technology has advanced. I mean, just to look at in just a few short years, in a couple of decades, how we’ve come to rely on this technology, and how it’s all integrated through satellites. And Dell has this Rugged computer system that can withstand saltwater and everything you can throw at it.To listen to the full interview with Sir John, download the “Complete the World’s Toughest Endurance Yacht Race…With Rugged Tech” episode of Luminaries—Talking to the Brightest Minds in Tech. Discover Dell Technologies’ vision for the future and learn new capabilities, how to reinvent processes, innovate faster and create value that will change the game for your business & career. Register for Dell Technologies World today.last_img read more

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Chilled Hours.

By on January 17, 2021

first_imgMild fall weather gave way to sharp drops in temperatures over the past few weeks in much of Georgia. This wintry weather comes none too early for two major sweet crops in the state, say University of Georgia experts.Georgia peach farmers welcomed the cold. Their peaches need a certain number of chill hours, or hours below 45 degrees Fahrenheit, between Oct. 1 and Feb. 15.Need a ChillDepending on the variety, peaches need from 400 to about 1,000 chill hours to perform well during the growing season, said Kathryn Taylor, a horticulturist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.About 95 percent of Georgia’s peaches are grown in the middle of the state. To get by, peaches there need at least 900 chill hours by Feb. 15.”The past couple of weeks of cold weather has helped a lot,” Taylor said.So Far, So GoodSo far, the region has about 480 chill hours. That’s good. But to get all the chill hours needed by Feb. 15, the area must get 12 chill hours a day.”If we can get that, we’ll be in good shape,” she said.South Georgia peaches need about 650 chill hours before Feb. 15. But they can live with 600 hours, Taylor said.So far, south Georgia has about 402 chill hours. That’s also good. To get the rest of their chill hours, peaches here need about 6.5 chill hours a day before Feb. 15.Peaches require a certain number of chill hours to break winter dormancy, Taylor said. If they don’t get the hours, it can cause the fruit to be poorly shaped or aborted.After Feb. 15, peach trees begin putting on buds. They then start requiring heat units, or temperatures above 55 degrees.Onions Welcome ColdGeorgia Vidalia onion growers welcomed the cold, too.”We’re going to lose some foliage from frost injury and sleet damage. But overall, we’re looking pretty good,” said Reid Torrance, county extension agent in Tattnall County, where about 60 percent of the Vidalia onions grow.He said the onions needed the cold weather.Slower Growth”We’ve had such a warm fall that until about three weeks ago, the onions were actually growing too fast,” he said. “We needed some cooler weather to slow down the growth. We’re pretty happy with the growth of the onions right now.”Vidalia onions are harvested from late April through June.The number of planted acres won’t be reported until March.”I don’t see any big change in acreage, however, from last year,” Torrance said. Farmers planted around 15,000 acres of Vidalia onions in 2000.last_img read more

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Hay Quality

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first_imgPoor hay quality due to last year’s increased rainfall, has Georgia cattle farmers searching for alternative ways to supplement the hay they feed their herd.Jacob Segers, beef cattle specialist with University of Georgia Extension, recommends planting winter annuals such as annual rye grass, wheat or different cover crops for cows to graze during the winter. Other feed sources high in digestible fiber, including soybean hulls, , corn gluten feed, citrus pulp and silage, are also suggested.Many county Extension agents, as well as cattle farmers, are asking Segers dietary questions because a normal food source is not meeting nutritional needs this year. More rain in 2013 resulted in hay maturing more rapidly. Because of inclement weather and wet conditions, most hay remained in fields until the skies cleared and the hay could be cut. As a result, the digestibility of the hay was low compared to that harvested in years with moderate rainfall. Also, left in the field and rained on, the hay lost a lot of nutrients essential for cattle’s growth.“It’s not abnormal (to have poor hay quality) in a wet year but we haven’t had a wet year in Georgia in a long time. We’ve had several years of drought where our issue was actually being able to get enough hay cut. The quality of the hay usually wasn’t an issue,” said Segers, who is based on the UGA campus in Tifton. In the past, storing enough hay for the winter was the problem most farmers faced. This year there is an abundance of hay, but the quality may not be sufficient to meet the animals’ needs, Segers said.Hay can lose approximately 20 percent of its energy value and 40 percent of its protein every ten days it has to stay in the field after the optimal cutting date, he said. “That leaves cattlemen in a situation where the hay is probably not going to meet the nutritional requirements of at least certain segments of a cowherd,” Segers said. Insuring cattle are properly nourished is a top priority for cattlemen, whose business thrives on cattle’s good health. Segers says if cows aren’t receiving necessary levels of nutrients, their chances of conception are reduced. If farmers don’t have a calf on the ground every 365 days, they lose money.“Physiologically speaking, the first thing a cow is going to sacrifice is reproduction (if not receiving enough nutrients). Then her milk production will decline. Then, if you are dealing with heifers, you’ll see them stop growing,” Segers said.When a cow consumes nutrients, her first objective is to maintain her own health; keep the heart beating and lungs expanding. Then if a cow has a calf, nutrients are used for lactation. Many nutritional hurdles have to be cleared so a cow is healthy enough for reproduction.“Our No. 1 priority is No. 4 on her list,” Segers said.If the animal is a heifer that is still growing, the nutrients go toward growth until the animal reaches maturity. Segers says it’s important for cattle farmers to know that not all cows require the same amount of nutrients. A non-lactating, pregnant cow requires much less nutrition than a cow that has just had a calf and is starting to lactate. It’s also important for cattlemen to get their hay tested. Some low-quality hay might suffice for cows with low nutrient requirements, he said.Segers also recommends farmers avoid high starch feeds to decrease metabolic disorders and increase efficiency in the cow herd.For more information on feeding hay to cattle, see the UGA Extension publications at caes.uga.last_img read more

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Norway’s Parliament approves expanded divestment from fossil fuel investments

By on December 31, 2020

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Wall Street Journal ($):Norway’s sovereign-wealth fund is embracing renewable energy and winding down fossil-fuel investments.The Scandinavian nation’s parliament voted on Wednesday to instruct its $1 trillion fund to pull an estimated more than $13 billion from oil, gas and coal extracting companies and move up to $20 billion into renewable-energy projects and companies, representing around 2% of the fund.The Government Pension Fund Global—which has around 6% of its holdings in fossil-fuel equities—won’t pull investments from major oil companies, but will divest from smaller energy exploration and production firms, according to a proposal from the Ministry of Finance. The move could affect several of its U.S. investments including its 1.08% stake in Anadarko Petroleum Corp. , 0.98% in Occidental Petroleum Corp. and 0.96% in EOG Resources Inc.Norway’s sovereign-wealth fund is one of the largest in the world, investing in nearly 9,200 companies globally as of the end of 2018, according to government data. It has a stake in some 341 oil-and-gas companies, the largest share in the U.S., at 31% of those holdings.Norway forged its social wealth fund in 1990 with profits from the North Sea oil fields. The country’s divestment comes as government pension funds face mounting political pressure to exit fossil fuels and realign their strategies around green businesses and clean energy to meet the goals of the Paris Agreement on climate change. While political forces helped drive the divestment, the decision also reduces financial risk because the oil-and-gas industry is no longer as profitable since the oil-price drop in 2014—while renewables are in a growth phase, said Tom Sanzillo, director of finance at the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, a research firm.More ($): Norway’s sovereign-wealth fund boosts renewable energy, divests fossil fuels Norway’s Parliament approves expanded divestment from fossil fuel investmentslast_img read more

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Tax reform recap: CU tax exemption intact in House, Senate bills

By on December 17, 2020

first_img continue reading » Last week, the House and Senate made progress on federal tax reform. The credit union tax exemption remains intact in each of the chamber’s respective tax bills.Here’s a rundown of what happened last week:The House Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (H.R. 1) was voted on by the full House Thursday and passed by a vote of 227-205. It now moves to the Senate for consideration.The Senate Finance Committee late Thursday night approved and reported out the Senate Tax Cuts and Jobs Act on a party-line vote after four days of mark-up. It now moves to the full Senate for consideration. Potentially complicating the Senate’s passage of the bill is the inclusion of the repeal of the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate. The tax reform bill is being moved through the reconciliation process, which requires only a simple majority to pass; however, a few Republican senators are unlikely to support the bill with the individual mandate repeal included. 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Crapo delivers crushing blow to pot banking

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first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Senate Banking Committee Chairman Mike Crapo delivered a significant blow Wednesday to legislation enabling banks and credit unions to serve the cannabis industry, announcing his opposition to a bill designed to help marijuana businesses in the more than 30 states that have legalized the substance.“I have significant concerns that the SAFE Banking Act does not address the high level potency of marijuana, marketing tactics to children, lack of research on marijuana’s effects, and the need to prevent bad actors and cartels from using the banks to disguise ill-gotten cash to launder money into the financial system,” Crapo said in a detailed statement about his views on the issue.Crapo’s plans have been the subject of intense speculation since the House passed the Secure and Fair Enforcement Banking Act. The biggest question has been whether he would hold a vote on pot banking legislation in 2019. But his statement all but confirms that he will not move such a bill this year.Instead, Crapo requested public feedback to help forge a legislative solution to the issue that addresses his concerns. continue reading »last_img read more

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Endicott mayor recommends village board cancel new recycling operation restrictions

By on December 8, 2020

first_imgENDICOTT (WBNG) — The back and forth over industrial zoning in Endicott continues. She said, “We learned that the only decision we as a Village could make was regarding adding safety restrictions to our existing zoning code.” After months of conversations over Zoom, met with some oppostion, Endicott Mayor Linda Jackson said she is recommending the village board repeal the restrictions recently passed on the recycling operations in the village. In a press release sent to 12 News, Jackson says Endicott is a village with a reputation built on technology and is what its economy depends on. Jackson explained the village was initially skeptical of the DEC following through on its responsibilities based on past experiences. It comes as the battery recycling facility set to be operated by SungEel MCC Americas was put on hold by the DEC, which wants to look further into its recycling process and certain chemicals involved before it gets up and running. “Recently they have proved to be responsive to the watchdog role they play over this company,” said Jackson. “We will let the DEC and the company work out the next phase of the permit review process.”last_img read more

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Game lag: Poor digital infrastructure, human capital hinder gaming growth

By on October 19, 2020

first_img“We have opportunities right now, as our businesses are not as impacted as other industries. However, we don’t have sufficient infrastructure and our talent is not trained for this market,” Cipto said during an online webinar held by the Tourism and Creative Economy Ministry.Market tracker SuperData reported that spending on digital video games globally hit a record high of US$10 billion in March since the COVID-19 pandemic. It also noted that spending rose 15 percent on mobile games – mostly smartphone games – to reach $5.7 billion in March.Similarly, mobile market analytics AppsFlyer noted that more people were making in-app purchases for online games in Indonesia during the pandemic.Despite significant revenue growth in the IP subsector, Cipto said companies who designed games to be used for companies’ marketing and product showcasing, dubbed the “gamification” subsector, had seen a significant decline by up to 75 percent as exhibitions and events are called off amid the pandemic. Poor digital infrastructure and a lack of human capital are hampering gaming industry growth in Indonesia despite opportunities to expand during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Indonesian Game Industry Association (AGI) has said.The AGI’s chairman Cipto Adiguno said on Wednesday that the gaming and digital industry had the potential to outpace other economic sectors as they were less impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, but the lack of infrastructure made it hard for the industry to seize the opportunity.According to the AGI’s calculation, companies that develop gaming products, referred to as the intellectual property (IP) subsector, have seen their revenue increase by more than 50 percent since the pandemic hit Indonesia in early March. Topics :center_img “As there are currently no events being held, customers are deferring their payments, which affects companies’ cash flow. We can say that the financial damage in this subsector is pretty high,” he said.According to a survey conducted by the AGI of Indonesian gaming companies in March, some 30 percent of respondents said they lost Rp 101 million (US$ 6,926) to 300 million in profits because of the pandemic while 10 percent reported losses of Rp 25 million to 50 million.The Tourism and Creative Economy Ministry’s movie, television and animation director, Syaifulloh, acknowledged that the creative and digital sector were not ready to fully transform their business models and adapt to the changes that have been wrought by the pandemic.“When COVID-19 hit the industry, the companies still needed time and funds to adjust their operations,” he said during the online webinar.While the pandemic has inflicted revenue declines on parts of the gaming industry, it has also reduced the disadvantages of the gaming industry in Southeast Asia in regard to product marketing, Philippines Game Developers Association (GDAP) chairman Alvin Juban said.With gaming conventions going online because of the pandemic, Alvin said developers did not have to spend a huge amount on traveling abroad and exhibiting their products, thus reducing the gap between large gaming corporation and small-scale developers.“Reaching clients through online platforms has become very effective. This is where we have to invest our resources if we want to expand our businesses and generate more investment from people around the world,” he said.last_img read more

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Transocean posts $208M loss

By on September 28, 2020

first_imgFloating rig contractor Transocean has reported a net loss attributable to controlling interest of $208 million for the second quarter of 2019. The company’s loss in the second quarter of 2018 was around $1.1 billion.Illustration: A Transocean drillship; Photo by John/Flickr – Shared under CC BY-NC 2.0 licenseTotal contract drilling revenues were $758 million for the second quarter of 2019, down from $790 million in the corresponding quarter a year ago.Operating and maintenance expense was $510 million, an increase vs. Q2 2018 O&M expense of $431 million. Contract backlog was $11.4 billion as of the July 2019 Fleet Status Report. This is a decrease compared to July 2018 contract backlog of $11.7 billion.Second-quarter 2019 capital expenditures of $86 million were related to the company’s newbuild drillships and capital upgrades for some rigs in the existing fleet.The offshore drilling company’s rig fleet-wide average daily revenue for the quarter was $314,900, an increase compared to Q2 2018 when the average dayrate was $308,300.Ultra-deepwater floaters commanded an average daily revenue of $335,400, harsh-environment floaters had an average of $301,700, and midwater floaters had an average of $163,700 in Q2 2019. Utilization was 56 percent for the whole fleet, down from 57 percent a year ago.Transocean has total current assets of $4.2 billion. The offshore drilling company has long-term liabilities of $11,4 billion, and total current liabilities of $1,46 billion.Jeremy Thigpen, President, and Chief Executive Officer said: “We continued to operate at a high level throughout the second quarter, with strong rig uptime and attained performance bonuses producing revenue efficiency of approximately 98% across our global floater fleet.”“As importantly, we generated strong cash flows from operations of $153 million through the efficient conversion of our industry-best $11,4 billion backlog.”Thigpen said that despite some continued uncertainty around oil prices, offshore project economics remain compelling, driving increases in floater contracting and increasing dayrates in both the harsh environment and ultra-deepwater markets.Transocean last week released a fleet status report according to which it has recently managed to find work for two semi-submersible drilling rigs and three drillships. The contracts have added around $158 million to the company’s backlog.Offshore Energy Today StaffSpotted a typo? Have something more to add to the story? Maybe a nice photo? Contact our editorial team via email. Also, if you’re interested in showcasing your company, product, or technology on Offshore Energy Today, please contact us via our advertising form where you can also see our media kit.last_img read more

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