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Watch Anders Osborne And Tom Hamilton Jam On Grateful Dead’s ‘Bertha’ At The Cap

By on March 2, 2021

first_imgLast Friday, February 26th, Anders Osborne came out firing for his first-ever headlining performance at the Capitol Theatre. Osborne has had a strong beginning of 2016, and has a new album called Spacedust & Ocean Views due out early this year. In celebration, Osborne brought his New Orleans-influenced sound to the famed Port Chester venue, with Tom Hamilton’s American Babies on as support.Naturally, fans who were keeping their fingers crossed for an Osborne-Hamilton collaboration got their wish, as the JRAD guitarist linked up with Osborne during the middle of his headlining set. Hamilton joined in for “Back On Dumaine,” an Osborne original, before segueing into a cover of Grateful Dead’s “Bertha.” Watch video below via Sean Roche:The band also covered Bob Dylan’s “Masters Of War,” seen below:Check out photos from the night, courtesy of Andrew Blackstein: Load remaining images Setlist: Anders Osborne at The Capitol Theatre, Port Chester, NY – 2/27/16Set: 5 Bullets, Pleasing You, Big Talk, Lafayette, Back On Dumaine > Bertha > Masters Of War, Pontchartrain > Coming Down, Windows, Move Back To Mississippi, Charlie Parker, Me And Lola (?)Encore: The Lucky One, It’s Gonna Be OkayCheck out Andrew Scott Blackstein Photography‘s full gallery below:last_img read more

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Foo Fighters And Run The Jewels To Play Pre-Super Bowl Concert At Pop-Up Atlanta Concert Venue [Photos]

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first_imgMusic and professional sports are two very different realms with often very different kinds of fanbases, yet the two entertainment-based industries continue to work hand in hand–especially when the Super Bowl returns each winter. While the NFL has yet to officially confirm pop/rock outfit Maroon 5 to reportedly headline the Super Bowl Halftime Show at Atlanta’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium come February, fans in town for the big game will for certain at least get to rock out the night prior when Foo Fighters and Run The Jewels perform at a pop-up venue as part of the annual DIRECTV Super Saturday Night concert event on Saturday, February 2nd.The one night concert event is scheduled to take place on the eve of Super Bowl LIII, and will be be held at a brand new, customized 3-tiered, 72,000 square-foot music venue. The venue is is constructed specifically for the sports weekend, and will be located at Atlantic Station, a shopping-friendly plaza located just north of downtown Atlanta and roughly three miles north of Mercedes-Benz Stadium. It’s the same location where Cirque du Soleil reportedly sets up their own enormous tents whenever they’re in Atlanta.The announcement did not detail whether or not the venue would remain active for future shows following the Super Bowl festivities in early February. The pop-up venue will however require up to 200 seasonal laborers working around 28,000 hours between now and February, in hopes of finalizing 29,000 feet of steel beams and 65,000 feet of electrical cable required to put on the show. The venue was designed by Jack Murphy, who also worked on building a three-level pop-up venue a parking lot in Houston for Super Bowl festivities in 2017. Plans for the venue’s interior design from both the side, back-of-house, and overhead angles can be seen in the photos below.Foo Fighters and Run The Jewels have spent the last year and a half touring heavily in promotion of each of their respective studio albums. The Foo Fighters released their ninth record, Concrete and Gold, in September of last year, while RTJ surprised their fans with the sudden release of their self-titled Run the Jewels 3 on Christmas Eve in 2016. The news of Run The Jewels working alongside the NFL also comes as somewhat of a surprise, considering the two parties haven’t always seen eye to eye.Tickets for the Super Saturday Night concert event will begin general on-sale on November 30th, and can be found by clicking here.Super Saturday Night Venue Exterior/Interior Design Plans[Photo: Joanna-Maria Helinurm]Super Saturday Night Venue Interior Design Plans[Photo: Joanna-Maria Helinurm][H/T Billboard]last_img read more

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It takes a community to make compost

By on March 1, 2021

first_imgWhen Conor Guidarelli and Wes Kalloch make their weekly trip to Turtle Swamp Brewing in Jamaica Plain, they’re not on a beer run. The horticulturists have another mission — to make nutrient-rich compost for the plant collections at the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University.Besides picking up about 2,000 pounds of wet, spent grain from Turtle Swamp, they also get as much as 40 pounds of used coffee grounds each week from Recreo Coffee in West Roxbury. Both are ingredients in the recipe Guidarelli and Kalloch created in 2018 for the Arboretum’s soil-management program.The donations from the two local businesses are a considerable contribution to the environmentally sustainable composting program the Arboretum tailored specifically to the needs of its collections. An added benefit: It makes use of organic waste that would otherwise be destined for a landfill.“This is part of an important initiative at the Arboretum to support small local businesses and become more integrated into our surrounding communities,” said William “Ned” Friedman, Arnold Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, director of the Arboretum, and a longtime Jamaica Plain resident. “And from a tree’s perspective, what could be better than a mix of coffee and beer spread over your root system?”Guidarelli, who was hired in 2016 to help guide the soil and composting initiative, said the Arboretum is managing green waste in-house in an environmentally responsible way.“We are working hard to be more sustainable, to sequester carbon, and improve the organic matter of the soil,” he said.That’s not an easy task on a 281-acre collection of woody plants from around the world, many of which are members of species threatened with extinction. The horticulture team must address the needs of each species, while keeping an eye on fluctuations in temperature and precipitation, pests, diseases, and other environmental factors.,In 2017 the Arboretum formed a Soils Advisory Committee to enhance critical thinking about the long-term health of their soils, collection, and larger environment, according to Andrew Gapinski, head of horticulture. Comprised of soil scientists from North America representing academia, public gardens, and government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Forest Service, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the committee outlined several initiatives and maintenance practices.“Our horticulture team is reviewing all aspects of our operations — a continuous cycle of assessment, planning, evaluation, and adjustment to find the most effective care strategies,” Gapinski said. “The composting endeavor is one example of the many innovative solutions underway to find the most effective and sustainable care strategies for the long-term health of the collections and landscape.”In 2018, the first year of the new system, the Arboretum produced more than 50 cubic yards, or 20.25 tons, of compost, in individual batches of approximately 15 cubic yards. Guidarelli and Kalloch created recipes that blended “browns,” such dead leaves, and “greens,” such as pulled herbaceous weeds, with the spent coffee grounds and beer grains to achieve the carbon and nitrogen ratios needed.“Composting is both a science and an art, because even when the numbers line up on paper, sometimes when we are looking at an actual batch, we have to throw in another scoop of browns or another scoop of greens,” Guidarelli said. “I like to cook, and this is just large-scale cooking. It’s like solving a puzzle to get your most efficient recipe per batch. It’s a lot of fun.”,But it’s not a “set it and forget it,” he said. It’s a very time and labor-intensive, year-round, active management process. The compost piles go through naturally occurring heating cycles that kill off any weed seeds, plant pests, and diseases, and help determine the stages of the composting process. Guidarelli and Kalloch insert four-foot thermometers into the piles to measure temperature fluctuations, waiting for the pile to get to 130 degrees, the magic number that shows the compost is ready for the next stage.Another good indicator? Odor. The greens emit methane, which definitely smells bad until the pile has gone through its anaerobic process, and even then may need an adjustment, according to Guidarelli. They turn the piles with a front-end loader to aerate them, or they may add more carbon.“You just kind of eyeball it with a ratio,” he said. “My mom used to tell me when I was cooking that it’s easier to add than to take away, so I just keep adding little by little until I hit the right mark.”Nicholas Walther, founder and brewer at Turtle Swamp Brewing, said providing the Arboretum with part of their compost mix is a win-win. Safely disposing of spent grains is a challenge for brewers. In Massachusetts there are strict limits on how much wet waste can go into a dumpster, and Turtle Swamp can generate as much as 1,200 pounds of spent grain material per batch of beer.,“Making this relationship has been amazing, because right when we began production, the Arboretum started its active compost program, processing compost in large quantities at a fast rate,” he said. “From an ecological aspect, this is a really helpful way to keep methane from being released into the atmosphere, so it’s helping the carbon footprint.”That is what Guidarelli and Kalloch are proudest of — being able to recycle the raw organics they have pulled off the landscape and return nutrient-rich organic matter back to it as their compost is applied to new plantings or trees and shrubs that need extra support.And yes, try this at home, but with caution. The standard ratio for composting is two parts brown (leaves, mulch, straw, etc.) to one part green (weeds, grass clippings, fruit and vegetable scraps, egg shells, coffee grounds), but Guidarelli warned that the ratio is a starting point: “They may need to make adjustments. … Ultimately we are trying to achieve a starting carbon:nitrogen ratio of 30:1, what’s most ideal for microbial growth,” he said.Guidarelli added that in urban areas it’s important to be cognizant of neighbors and public health safety. Composting is safe if done correctly, but best if done through community initiatives. He hopes the Arboretum is helping set an example with its sustainability practices.“It’s great to see the Arboretum’s dedication to creating custom, high-quality compost, especially when the amount we get is small for such a large landscape,” he said. “But we can always make more to meet our operational needs, and we will.”last_img read more

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Dance Marathon sets record charity goal

By on January 26, 2021

first_imgWith 12 hours of dancing, crafts, activities and performers, Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon has teamed up with Notre Dame in the hopes of raising more than last year’s total of over $77,000 for the Riley Hospital for Children.  Meaghan Curliss, senior and vice president of Dance Marathon, said organizers of the event set high expectations. “Our goal is always to beat the year before,” she said. This year’s Dance Marathon will begin March 5 at noon and end at midnight. Senior Colleen Trausch, dancer relations and recruitment chair, said the group is on its way to matching last year’s total with 100 dancers signed up from Saint Mary’s alone. She said they do not know the number of Notre Dame participants yet. Curliss said the committee hopes to increase the number of dancers. “We want more participants — people who will stick with the cause,” she said. Children from the Riley Hospital for Children and their families will be attending the event. “Participants will really have a chance to see a tangible effect on the children whose lives they are helping,” Curliss said. The night will also include crafts, activities, inflatables and food for the dancers. Local bands will perform, and there will be a DJ for the entire event. Chipotle, Papa Vino’s, Red Robin, Hot Box and Subway will be available. Curliss said she appreciates the participants coming out for a good cause.  “I’m really excited,” Curliss said. “I really hope everyone can come out. It’s a great event to see how much this can impact and really change lives.” Those who are not registered are still invited to come. “It’s a really rewarding event,” Trausch said. To register for the event, students are asked for a $15 donation, which can be done today and Feb. 28 to March 4 in the Student Center Atrium during lunch and dinner hours. Notre Dame students can register online by searching Riley Children Foundation at www.nd.edu. Donations can be made through Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon’s website, www.smcdancemarathon.orglast_img read more

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Bar panel drafting Amend. 3 waiver seeks comments

By on December 19, 2020

first_img January 15, 2006 Regular News Bar panel drafting Amend. 3 waiver seeks comments Bar panel drafting Amend. 3 waiver seeks commentscenter_img The Florida Bar special committee that has been ordered by the Supreme Court to draft a rule amendment establishing a procedure whereby a medical liability claimant may waive the rights granted by Amendment 3 — which limits contingency fees in medical malpractice cases — is now accepting comments until the close of business January 17. Acting December 14 in case no. SC05-1150, the court directed that the proposed amendment to Bar Rule 4-1.5(f)(4)(B): • Acknowledge the provisions of Art. 1, §26 of the Florida Constitution. That section contains the limitations approved by voters in November 2004, which sets fees in medical malpractice cases to 30 percent of the first $250,000 and 10 percent above that amount. • Affirm the obligation of an attorney to notify any potential client with a medical liability claim of the provisions of Art. I, §26. • Include a procedure whereby a medical liability claimant may “knowingly and voluntarily waive the rights” granted by Art. 1, §26. The court also said the proposed procedure may involve judicial oversight or review of the waiver and may include a standard waiver form or otherwise provide for the protection of the rights of a potential client. The court ordered the Bar to submit its proposed amendment by February 13. The Bar has asked for an additional 10 days in order to allow for review of the draft amendment by the full Board of Governors. Once the proposal is submitted, it will be published in the News for comment. Earlier last year, former Justice Stephen Grimes and 53 other lawyers filed a rule petition with the court asking it to amend Bar contingency fees rules to conform to Amendment 3. The court held oral arguments on that petition, which drew hundreds of comments (almost all negative) from lawyers and a few nonlawyers, on November 30. (See the December 15 Bar News. ) Other members of the special committee, appointed by President Alan Bookman, include Jamie Moses, Eugene Pettis, Murray Silverstein, Howard Coker, William Hahn, Thomas D. Masterson, Joseph Milton, Randy J. Ogden, Francis E. Pierce III, Herman Russomanno, and Bill Wagner. The committee prefers that comments be submitted via e-mail to Tony Boggs, director of the Bar’s Legal Division, at [email protected] or they may be faxed to (850) 561-5665 no later than January 17.last_img read more

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Brentwood Man Convicted of Gang Murder

By on December 18, 2020

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Brentwood man was convicted Tuesday of helping two fellow MS-13 street gang members kill a fourth member during an internal conflict four years ago.A Suffolk County jury found Juan “Titanic” Gomez guilty of second-degree murder and conspiracy. The 19-year-old man is expected to be sentenced next month.Authorities have said Gomez, Wilmer “Chewey” Zuniga and Onan Chica fatally shot 21-year-old Leodan Bonilla of Central Islip in December 2010 and left his body on the side of the Southern State Parkway in North Bay Shore.Zuniga were previously convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to 25 years to life in prison. Chica pleaded guilty in December to manslaughter. Gomez’ attorney reportedly plans to appeal the conviction.last_img read more

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This wearable will shock you if you spend too much money

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first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr We know how it is. Your salary comes in and suddenly your bank account that looked miserable a week ago suddenly seems full and happy, and so begins your spending spree. Before you know it, you’re back to where you were the month before. The good news is that a company by the name of Intelligent Environments wants to help you start saving.How will they do this? Simple, by giving you a little electric shock via a wearable when it detects that you have spent too much money. If you’re wondering why this sounds familiar, it is because the wearable in question is the Pavlok that was launched in 2014. This is a wearable designed to help users develop good habits through negative reinforcements.The folks at Intelligent Environments took advantage of that feature and built a platform that will link to your bank account. Users can set a limit in terms of how low they want to allow their account to go, and should it reach that mark or below, prepare to receive a 255 volt shock on your wrist. continue reading »last_img read more

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How to keep your credit union’s brand top of wallet

By on December 17, 2020

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr This is placeholder text continue reading » This post is currently collecting data…center_img With more payment options available than ever before to consumers, keeping your credit union card top of wallet can be challenging in today’s competitive landscape. A standout card can strengthen your credit union’s brand and drive member engagement. Here are some tactics to consider that can help get your traditional and digital cards to stand out to cardholders.Debit, credit, ATM and prepaid cards that you issue members represent a tactile and visual connection to your brand and value. For instance, metal cards have grown in popularity as a sturdy status symbol. Here are some questions to address as you plan your card strategies:Are you offering various print options, i.e. traditional (embossed) lettering or flat, unraised lettering, or laser printing? And more importantly in today’s COVID-19 environment, is your card contactless?Is your card vibrant? Using various color options, card finishes, color cores and magstripe options can bring your card to life.last_img read more

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Time for Noé to turn his attentions elsewhere

By on October 20, 2020

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Governor Tom Wolf Announces Development of Philadelphia Community Center

By on October 16, 2020

first_imgGovernor Tom Wolf Announces Development of Philadelphia Community Center Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today announced that Commonwealth Cornerstone Group (CCG) has completed a $9 million New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) financing transaction that will help fund development of commercial and community portions of the Eastern Tower Community Center project in Philadelphia’s Chinatown. The center is a mixed-use development at the northwest corner of 10th and Vine streets.“This project is exciting not only for its commercial and recreational offerings for families in that area, but it has the potential to help reconnect the Chinatown community that is split by the Vine Street Expressway,” said Governor Wolf.The project was envisioned more than a decade ago by the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation (PCDC) as a much-needed community, event and public recreation space in that neighborhood. Planned in collaboration with co-developer JNA Capital, a Philadelphia urban mixed-use developer, the project includes 45,000 square feet on the ground to fifth floors of the 20-story building. In addition to the community and recreation center, the commercial space is envisioned as possibly including a convenience store, a restaurant, a coffee and tea shop, a pre-school and a medical practice. The upper floors of the building will eventually include 150 residential units.The Eastern Tower Community Center project is expected to support 371 full-time jobs during the construction phase. Once work on the building is completed, it is anticipated that 19 current full-time positions will be retained and 52 new full-time positions will be created. The finished, leased space will provide job opportunities at various skill levels ranging from retail sales to licensed professional positions.“We believe this project will provide a vital recreational and community gathering place for people living in that neighborhood,” said Brian A. Hudson Sr., CCG chairman and executive director of the Pennsylvania Housing Finance Agency (PHFA). “It also will support the continued revitalization of the 10th Street commercial corridor.“PHFA has a longstanding productive relationship with the Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation, and we look forward to building on the strength of that relationship with the launch of this new project.”CCG was created in 2004 by PHFA to serve as a nonprofit community development entity.“We are delighted and honored to have the support of the Governor’s Office and PHFA, along with a wide range of funders including equity and debt financing, to advance the long-term vision of Chinatown community,” said John Chin, executive director of PCDC.Ahsan Nasratullah, president of JNA Capital, added, “Building on the deep community roots of PCDC as a community developer, PCDC and JNA Capital have assembled a strong development team to effectively advance commercial development along the 10th Street corridor to the north of Vine Street and unite the Chinatown community.”About Commonwealth Cornerstone GroupThe goal of CCG, through its administration of New Markets Tax Credits, is to fund projects in key areas of communities that have historic or cultural value and offer opportunities to spark economic revitalization. CCG utilizes NMTCs to provide loans and equity investments for business expansion, mixed-use development, and community facilities across Pennsylvania. Examples of past developments that have benefited from CCG’s investment of these tax credits include Bakery Square in Pittsburgh, the Coal Street Community Facility in Wilkes-Barre, and Schmucker Hall in Gettysburg. Learn more at: www.commonwealthcornerstone.org/.About the New Markets Tax Credit ProgramThe New Markets Tax Credit Program was established by Congress in 2000 to spur new or increased investments in operating businesses and real estate projects located in low-income communities. The NMTC Program attracts investment capital to low-income communities by permitting individual and corporate investors to receive a tax credit against their federal income tax return in exchange for making equity investments in specialized financial institutions called community development entities, such as Commonwealth Cornerstone Group. The program is administered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury.About Philadelphia Chinatown Development CorporationPCDC is a Philadelphia nonprofit 501(c)(3) community development corporation established in 1969 with a mission to preserve, protect and promote Philadelphia’s Chinatown as a viable ethnic, residential and business community. Since its inception, PCDC has developed more than 320 units of mixed-income housing and 27,000 square feet of retail space, plus it has implemented streetscape improvement projects. It also sponsors community program services and has been recognized with numerous awards. See: www.chinatown-pcdc.org.About JNA CapitalJNA Capital is a boutique real estate finance and development company that has more than $90 million in urban mixed-use and community anchored real estate ventures under management.  JNA Capital’s focus has been in creating economic development solutions through real estate development in distressed communities in and around anchored-communities and academic/anchor institutions. Learn more at: www.jnacapitalinc.com. SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img July 26, 2017last_img read more

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