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Holly Bowling Covers Phish, Grateful Dead & Disco Biscuits At AURA [Full Audio]

By on March 2, 2021

first_imgHolly Bowling delivered a smashing set for AURA Music Festival over the weekend, mixing Phish, Grateful Dead, and Disco Biscuits favorites for a Saturday morning celebration at Suwannee. She also debuted a few new ones, including a full version of tDB’s “Magellan,” “Wharf Rat,” and “Terrapin Station.”Bowling was also on hand for Pink Talking Fish’s performance earlier in the weekend, where she provided some additional keyboard accompaniment for “Weekapaug Groove.” You can watch that one, right here.Thanks to our friends at CHeeSeHeaDPRoDuCTioNS, we have some stellar audio of Holly Bowling’s solo set from the festival. Tune in below:Setlist: Holly Bowling at AURA Music & Arts Festival, Live Oak, FL – 3/5/16:Set: Silent in the Morning *, Fly Famous Mockingbird, Help on the Way* > Slipknot! > Magellan ** > Terrapin Suite# > Slipknot! > Franklin’s Tower*** >  Wharf Rat#@ > Squirming Coil &# first time performed by Holly* Terrapin tease** unfinished*** Magellan [email protected] Terrapin, Chinacat & Confrontation teases& Terrapin & Magellan teaseWatch Holly Bowling Cover The Weeknd In The Middle Of A Phish Song [Full Show Audio]Be sure to check out some of our other CHeeSeHeaD videos from AURA, including highlights like Thievery Corporation jamming out some Grateful Dead, theNEWDEAL’s full set, and the Disco Biscuits playing “Scarlet Begonias > I Know You Rider” with Tom Hamilton. There’s more to come too!last_img read more

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Free WiFi Debuts at Robert Moses State Park Beaches

By on December 18, 2020

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A free public WiFi network recently launched at Robert Moses State Park, making it easier for visitors to access the Internet from the popular beach on the western tip of Fire Island.The network, titled Oh, Ranger! Wi-Fi™, has been installed—at no expense to taxpayers—at Fields 2, 3, 4 and 5 as a part of a partnership between Toyota Motors, the American Park Network and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, officials announced Tuesday.“Whether opting to use Wi-Fi to share real-time photos of friends and family exploring our parks, or accessing apps and maps, having access to this technology is another way to draw people to spend precious leisure time at our parks,” said Rose Harvey, the state parks commissioner.The announcement came about a year after the same WiFi network launched at Jones Beach State Park. Over the past year, the partnership has also installed Wi-Fi networks at Niagara Falls, Saratoga Spa and East River State Park.Officials are hopeful that the improved Internet availability will draw more patrons to the beach, as well as other state parks this summer.The Wi-Fi program has been expanded as part of Toyota’s “Let’s Go Places” program. Officials are hopeful that this program will not only enhance visitors’ experiences by improving Internet access at the beach, but encourage them to learn about upcoming events, promote volunteerism, and support state park-related groups.Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that he expects the initiative “will attract more visitors to the great outdoors—boosting tourism and growing the Long Island economy.”Even though signs announcing the new network were only installed within the past week, the network had already seen hundreds of users since it was activated on July 10. This past Sunday, more than 2,000 users were on the network, according to the state parks department.While officials acknowledge that some people may be annoyed by the distraction that Internet access at the beach may cause, they feel that most, particularly younger generations, will view the new service favorably.Visitors seeking to log on to the Wi-Fi select “Oh, Ranger! Wi-Fi™” under available Wi-Fi networks on their devices, and then accept the standard terms and conditions.Jones Beach is not the only oceanfront park on LI that has free WiFi. All Suffolk County parks, including Smith Point in Shirley and Cupsogue in Westhampton, also provide the free service. Babylon town beaches such as Gilgo, Cedar and Overlook beaches do the same.last_img read more

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Broome County Landfill to resume collecting hazardous wastes June 3

By on December 8, 2020

first_imgCounty residents may begin dropping off their waste and electronics on June 3. Drop off hours will be from 7:30 to 11:30 a.m. For more information, click here. TOWN OF NANTICOKE (WBNG) — The Broome County Landfill will resume collecting household-hazardous waste and electronics in June. Additionally, the residential compost giveback program will resume the same day. The drop-off days were oringinally suspended due to the coronavirus pandemic. Everyone at the landfill is required to wear a mask.last_img read more

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Admirable Nelson

By on October 20, 2020

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Coronavirus preys on inequalities in working class Paris suburb

By on October 19, 2020

first_imgInequality Unemployment runs at more than double the national average in Seine-Saint-Denis. It is worst among youths, with more than one in three 15 to 24-year-olds out of work.Those with jobs are often employed in roles that put them at risk of infection, such as bus drivers, supermarket cashiers and nurses. Remote schooling has also been harder for some families in these areas, with not all pupils having internet access.”People need to get out. Kids need to breathe air and it’s tougher in these areas because they don’t have the escapes that you have elsewhere in Paris,” said Lahoucine, a teacher in neighboring Aulnay-sous-Bois.Local officials decry years of under-investment in Seine-Saint-Denis.According to government figures, the district has the lowest number of doctors anywhere in France and the largest rate of chronic diseases such as diabetes that can be major risk factors for COVID-19 sufferers.”Inequalities are killing Seine-Saint-Denis,” five local mayors wrote in an op-ed earlier this month.”These deep injustices, that nobody can choose to ignore, we must tackle them head on with actions. The new world post-pandemic … cannot follow the course of budgetary austerity that sacrifices lives,” they wrote.President Emmanuel Macron last week announced France would slowly unwind its lockdown from May 11. But Widad Abdi, an anesthetist-intensive care doctor at the Estree clinic, said the announcement on its own had prompted local residents to flout lockdown rules even more.”I fear there will still be a lot of COVID-19 cases here even if they diminish in other areas,” she said. Resuscitation nurse Aline Lheureux feared there would be trouble in the impoverished Paris suburb where she works when she heard youngsters playing sport in the streets outside even though France was under tough lockdown rules.”During meetings you could hear football matches being played,” Lheureux said. “People here live on top of each other in small flats that make it difficult to respect the lockdown.”In late March, she helped convert a unit of her private Estree clinic into a makeshift intensive care ward, as the coronavirus overwhelmed hospitals in Seine-Saint-Denis, one of France’s poorest districts on the northern edge of Paris. Topics :center_img Official data show that the spike in mortality rates during the coronavirus outbreak has been markedly higher in Seine-Saint-Denis than in the affluent capital on the other side of the ring-road.The heavy toll highlights how the combination of cramped social housing, workers with frontline jobs and a restless youth have turned some low-income zones from France to the United States into infection hotspots.From the clinic, located in the suburb of Stains, a cluster of high-rise tower blocks dominate the skyline. Often it is families of Maghreb and sub-Saharan African descent who live in the ‘banlieues’ that ring many French cities.Unrest has broken out during the past three nights in nearby suburbs where police enforcement of the lockdown has exacerbated deep-rooted social and economic tensions.last_img read more

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Sainsbury’s & Asda mega merger: what we know and what it means

By on October 18, 2020

first_imgThis article was last updated at 12 noon on Friday 4 May 2018,A merged Asda and Sainsbury’s would hold a combined market share of 32%The market is still coming to terms with the Tesco-Booker deal and now this: a £51bn-sales combination play between Sainsbury’s and Asda has been confirmed this morning. So what will it mean? And how on earth would it get competition clearance? Here’s an updated analysis from The Grocer following the announcement earlier this weekThe market was coming to terms with the Tesco-Booker deal and now this: a £51bn-sales mega-merger between Sainsbury’s and Asda was confirmed on Monday, after the story leaked out over the weekend (the announcement was originally scheduled for Wednesday’s annual Sainsbury’s results).So what will this mean? And how on earth would it get competition clearance? Here, we’ve pulled together various strands from The Grocer’s extensive online analysis this week in an easy-to-read summary.Who’s buying whom here? Sainsbury’s plc (which will remain the name of the combined Sainsbury’s-Asda business) is promising to create a “dynamic new player in UK retail, with an outstanding breadth of products delivered through multiple channels”.Read more: Sainsbury’s shares surge on Asda deal confirmationIt’s not quite a merger of equals. Sainsbury’s will retain control thanks to a £2.975bn cash payment to Walmart. The chairman (David Tyler), CEO (Mike Coupe) and CFO (Kevin O’Byrne) will all hail from Holborn, which will remain the HQ. In return Walmart will take a 42% stake, and have two seats on the board. Asda will continue to be run by CEO Roger Burnley, and there are no plans to close its Leeds HQ.Why has it happened?It’s clearly a bombshell announcement, though whether it’s surprising is another matter. Asda has struggled to compete against the discounters Aldi and Lidl (appearing powerless to close the price gap, despite massive cost-cutting and restructures), while it’s not been lost on Bentonville that the threat of a resurgent Tesco has only been compounded by the acquisition of Booker and the arrival with it of its hugely admired CEO Charles Wilson to run Tesco’s UK operations.The announcement noted that in the financial year to 31 December 2017, Asda’s sales grew 2.6% to £22.2bn, representing a return to positive like-for-like growth for the full year on the back of volume growth in own-label grocery and fresh food, as well as “strong growth in online on both the groceries and clothing sides”.But “investments in price and overall customer proposition” led to “a planned reduction in operating profits” from £845m to £720m. The direction of travel has been clear for some time: Walmart can’t keep milking the UK for dividends, as it has, in the midst of a discounter-led price war, and amid such structural upheaval. So something more fundamental had to be done. The imperative on the Sainsbury’s side is obvious too. Its acquisition of Argos, with same-day delivery in more parts of the country than Amazon, as well as click & collect, has been a considerable success, bolstering GM sales and enhancing its online capabilities. But Sainsbury’s is struggling to compete on price on the food and drink front, and has fallen further behind Tesco in terms of scale with the Booker merger.What is the value of the deal?Combined sales total £51bn. Sainsbury’s is paying £2.975bn to Asda parent company Walmart and issuing 1.6 billion new shares for a 42% stake, while Walmart has written off Asda’s debts and pension obligations, taking a £2bn hit in the process. The valuation of Asda at £7.3bn – barely more than the £6.9bn Walmart paid for Asda in 1999 – has already risen with the increase in Sainsbury’s share price.So how did the market react?Sainsbury’s shares surged 15% to reach their highest level in almost four years on Monday, spiking by more than 20% to 327.1p in early trading.As The Grocer went to press (on Thursday) it had fallen back to 302p. Bernstein analyst Bruno Monteyne said the share price did not yet reflect the material impact of the deal. “Either the market doubts [Sainsbury’s confidence in a favourable] CMA outcome, the size of the synergies, or the execution risk.”Read more: Leading City and retail analysts react to the Sainsbury’s-Asda mergerWhat will happen to the fascias?The combi plans to keep both fascias. That makes sense for two reasons: first, there’s what Coupe called the “truly remarkable” “complementality of the store portfolios”, with Asda weak in the south, and Sainsbury’s weak in Scotland, the north and Wales). As a result there are “no planned Sainsbury’s or Asda store closures of the combination” so far as Sainsbury’s is concerned. Second, the two supermarkets are hugely different in terms of consumer demographics, though Coupe and his new Walmart ‘colleagues’ Judith McKenna and Roger Burnley stressed the strong cultural fit.So if no stores are closing, and both head offices will remain, where are the synergies?Much of the logic of the deal lies in greater buying power. Sainsbury’s has identified £500m of buying “synergies”, with multinational suppliers (85% of their products are currently supplied by the same 100 suppliers) expected to generate savings of £350m purely through price harmonisation. A further £75m each will come from integrating Argos outlets into Asda stores, and the rest from savings on utilities and other operational costs. These synergies would be in addition to the 10% reduction in prices on “many of the products customers buy regularly” that Sainsbury’s expects.As well as the obvious clout of joining together two supermarkets with a combined market share of 32% (a bigger share of course than Tesco’s 28%) the deal will also give it access to Walmart’s even greater heft, via joint buying arrangements, while Asda could benefit from Sainsbury’s greater own-label expertise.How worried should suppliers be?It depends how big you are. The onus is on suppliers to help Sainsbury’s achieve the synergies, including the 10% price reduction on everyday lines that it’s held out as the most juicy and public-facing component of its ‘sharpened’ proposition.Yet Coupe insisted the merger was a “great deal” for suppliers, driving greater efficiency, streamlining supply chains, enabling differentiated ranges, and the opportunity to grow sales via a more attractive proposition that would simultaneously boost footfall.City Snapshot: Sainsbury’s and Asda confirm mega mergerSo far, lots of suppliers don’t buy that. MPs, unions and agricultural bodies such as the NFU are equally worried. In some cases, though, the fear may be unfounded.Coupe was at pains to point out he expected these synergies to come from “large, multinational suppliers, who make spectacular returns on equity and are very, very profitable”.“What we are trying to do is to identify synergies from those suppliers and reinvest them into UK customers.”The due diligence process – hosted via an anonymised, third party ‘black box’, to avoid competition abuse – has given both parties “a pretty good idea of the buying synergies”, he said. “We know the arithmetic. What we don’t know is who’s buying better where. That’s all stuff to work through. But what we know is that equalising prices on the same products, the money’s there.”So it’s not about better prices for bigger volumes (not yet anyway). This is simply about price “harmonisation” or “equalisation”: ensuring that whichever retailer was achieving the best price on a particular line, the same price would be secured for the other retailer.However, with the discounters achieving success through offering competitive pricing particularly in fresh produce and meat and fish – typically from smaller and in many cases British suppliers – Coupe stressed that “where we derive synergies is not necessarily where you would invest in price”. He added: “We think we will be a force for good, not just in how we compete, but in terms of resilience and the capacity to compete on any number of fronts.”What protection will there be for suppliers?Adjudicator Christine Tacon said on Wednesday that size did not matter when it came to the prospect of her protecting suppliers from a combined Sainsbury’s and Asda behemoth. Competition concerns“Size makes no difference to my ability to regulate them,” Tacon told members of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee when asked by chairman Neil Parish what she planned to do to stop the companies “stitching up” their supplier base.In fact, the Adjudicator even suggested to MPs that the market might actually work in her favour.“With my penalty powers I have the ability to fine in a way that’s going to hurt. One per cent is a lot of money for a business with 30% of it,” said Tacon. “In fact I would argue that the larger a retailer the more they are likely to embed IT and processing systems towards being Code compliant.”Tacon told MPs she hoped the result of the merger, if it goes through, might be to see Asda move from the bottom of the Adjudicator’s league table of behaviour to sit alongside Sainsbury’s close to the top. But the MPs failed to grasp the limits of the Adjudicator’s remit in terms of suppliers: that the GCA is pretty much a spectator when it comes to stopping Sainsbury’s and Asda from what another member of the committee described as “screwing suppliers into the ground”.Tacon made it clear that price negotiations have always been outside her remit. For suppliers, the only sunshine on the horizon would appear to be the possible intervention of the CMA.But when it launches its investigation into the proposed takeover, most experts seem to think that, as with previous takeovers, the issue of store crossover and a potential reduction in consumer choice will be at the forefront of the CMA’s probe.Which way will the CMA go? Logic is one thing, lawyers quite another. And the CMA has been notoriously pedantic and fastidious in its interpretation. For example, when the Co-op acquired eight MyLocal convenience stores out of administration in 2016, the CMA took seven months to rule it could only buy the store in Widnes if it sold two of its other three stores in the same town. On that basis it’s difficult to see how this combination play can get around competition concerns without some major remedies. Depending on the modelling used, retail store overlap between the two estates could result in as many as 245 store disposals – which would surely undermine the acquisition fatally – or as few as 15.Why such a big variance? It’s all about the changing retail landscape. As Coupe pointed out, the market has changed beyond recognition since the Morrisons takeover of Safeway (the last acquisition of retail stores of this size) in 2004. “It was a blunt fascia test,” but with online retailers, discounters, delivery services (Just Eat), and even recipe box operators, as well as more sophisticated convenience store offerings, “you have to [view the market] as a continuum. It’s a very different market and requires a higher level of sophistication. Whoever quotes 8% doesn’t understand it.It was in an interview with The Grocer in May 2016 that the CMA’s then CEO Alex Chisholm first raised the possibility that the CMA might countenance the prospect of a ‘big three’ rather than a big four.“We don’t have a policy position on the number,” he said. “But firms could come to us for confidential guidance, and some do.”Since then, the CMA has waved through the Tesco-Booker deal without any remedies, and while it did not acquire any stores (Tesco has no control over the prices set by independents that operate under the Premier, Londis and Budgens fascias), it was crucial, so far as Sainsbury’s is concerned, in establishing the precedent of including discounters as a bona fide competitor.Read more: How the Sainsbury’s Asda merger was covered in the national pressThe CMA’s model has therefore evolved, based on the concept of ‘weighted share of shops’. Rather than the binary model of old, many more competitors are considered, with their impacts allocated weightings. Experts agree those extra competitors in the consideration set can “materially impact the odds of the deal going through without very punitive disposal terms precedents,” says Bernstein’s Monteyne.That new “reality” is crucial to Coupe’s confidence in the chances of the deal going through. “We will engage positively in the process and we go into this with our eyes wide open but we believe it will come to the right answer for customers,” he says.Are stores the only concern for the CMA? Not necessarily. Online is also considered in the CMA’s methodology. And one area of investigation could be the dominance of the combi on the toys front. Sainsbury’s has only just acquired Argos, and so far it appears to have been relatively successful, gaining it instant and sizeable share in toys, alongside a number of GM markets in which it underindexed, while better utilising space in its stores. With a merger Asda plans to install Argos outlets (and the demographic fit is better than in the case of Sainsbury’s), but its combined share of the toys market in particular may be a problem, particularly when the Argos proposition is coupled with Walmart’s buying power.Sainsbury’s and Asda will argue that, with Amazon set to overtake Argos as the UK’s biggest toy retailer by 2020, the merger would redress the balance. And latterly the CMA has been alive to the online challenge. But as Chisholm says: “It’s not just how much people are buying online or how many hours people are online. It’s much more about the particular product or service. What is the buyer behaviour you see? What do they see as the alternatives?”That’s the challenge for the CMA. Calculating competition issues in a complex and fast-evolving market, across countless categories, is likely to take up to 18 months, Sainsbury’s estimates – longer than the Tesco-Booker merger.Sainsbury’s and Asda have asked the CMA to “fast track” the investigation by dispensing with the normal procedure of pre-investigation talks and going straight to phase two.So, it’s done its homework, it’s ready for the CMA, and so are competitors.As a rival supermarket CEO puts it: “Let the fun and games begin.”Keep up to date with the latest on the Sainsbury’s Asda merger with our dedicated news & analysis hublast_img read more

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PensionDanmark invests DKK1.4bn in second UK biomass power plant

By on September 29, 2020

first_imgLast year, the venture invested DKK1.4bn in the Brigg project in Lincolnshire.The latest project – the Snetterton power plant – will have total investment from the joint venture of DKK1.6bn, with DKK200m of that coming from BWSC.BWSC will build, operate and maintain the power plant for 15 years.The plant is scheduled to be up and running by spring 2017, and will have a capacity of 44.2 MW – equivalent to the average energy usage of 82,000 households.The plant will run on straw, and supply of the fuel has been contracted for the next 12 years, PensionDanmark said. Labour-market pension fund PensionDanmark is investing DKK1.4bn (€188m) in a biomass power plant to be built in the UK’s East Anglia, as part of a joint venture with Danish company Burmeister & Wain Scandinavian Contractor (BWSC).The DKK170bn Danish pension fund – which won this year’s Best European Pension Fund Award at the IPE Conference & Awards in Vienna – said the investment would be made via investment fund Copenhagen Infrastructure I, in which it is the sole investor. The joint venture is between the infrastructure fund and BWSC, and this will be the second biomass power plant deal in the UK it has signed.Torben Möger Pedersen, PensionDanmark’s chief executive, said: “We have to secure our members a good and steady return, and this cooperation delivers that.”last_img read more

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Irish regulator rejects calls to water down funding standard for DB schemes

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first_img“However, the increase to the standard resulting from the falling rates reflects (and may underestimate) the difficulties faced by these schemes, and there should be no question of changing the standard in order to give schemes and their members the false impression the situation is easier than it actually is,” he said. Kennedy’s comments come only weeks after the Irish Association of Pension Funds (IAPF) called for a review of the regulatory framework to take account of “artificial and unprecedented conditions” in bond markets.Speaking at the organisation’s annual investment conference in late March, IAPF chief executive Jerry Moriarty said that while 60% of DB funds now complied with the funding standard, the impact of quantitative easing was “effectively reversing” the improvements.Moriarty also questioned why DB trustees were coming under pressure to increase bond holdings and de-risk ahead of 2016’s introduction of new risk reserve requirements when many bonds were posting negative yields.The Irish pension industry was previously granted a reprieve, with the funding standard suspended for several years in the wake of the financial crisis.It was reinstated in 2012.Kennedy addressed the question of de-risking in his foreword, making the case that those wishing to continue with higher-risk strategies were often doing so to minimise the cost of providing benefits.“For the trustees of defined benefit schemes, this approach is unlikely to be consistent with their obligations as trustees, especially as the risks bear disproportionately on the younger members,” he said.The Authority earlier this year revealed that 30 DB schemes had yet to submit funding proposals, nearly two years after they were due.,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to Pensions Authority’s annual review Ireland’s pension sector should not expect any relaxation of the defined benefit (DB) funding standard despite prevailing low interest rates exacerbating deficits, the head of the Pensions Authority has warned.Brendan Kennedy said he accepted that low interest rates, triggered in part by the European Central Bank’s stimulus measures, made pension provision much more difficult.But he also stressed that scheme members needed predictable and reasonably secure income.In the foreword to the regulator’s annual review, he acknowledged requests to relax funding requirements “to reflect the problems this is causing to defined benefit schemes”.last_img read more

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EIOPA unveils membership of next pensions stakeholder group

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first_imgEIOPA has doubled the number of representatives for pension plan beneficiaries on its Occupational Pensions Stakeholder Group (OPSG), it announced this week.The EU regulator for insurers and occupational pension funds increased the number of beneficiary representatives from four to eight, at the expense of academic, employee and industry association representation. Pension funds continue to have 10 representatives on the 30-strong OPSG.“New appointments also reflect developments in EIOPA’s strategic priorities, demonstrating expertise in sustainable finance and fintech,” the authority said.Flavia Micilotta, executive director of Eurosif, the European Sustainable Investment Forum, is one of 19 new members of the OPSG. Jerry Moriarty, vice chair of PensionsEurope and CEO of the Irish Association of Pension Funds, joins the OPSG for its new termJerry Moriarty, CEO of the Irish Association of Pension Funds, has also joined the group as a representative of PensionsEurope, of which he is vice-chair.He effectively replaces Matti Leppälä, general secretary of PensionsEurope, who had served the maximum of two two-and-a-half year terms. He was chair of the OPSG. Other departures from the group include Janwillem Bouma, managing director of Shell’s Dutch pension funds and chair of PensionsEurope; Paul Brice, strategic adviser and trustee for RPMI Limited, the administration and trustee services arm of the UK railways pension scheme; and Laure Delahousse, deputy director general at the French asset management association AFG.The new OPSG membership is effective 4 September, with the group due to have its first meeting in October.The OPSG and its insurance counterpart advise EIOPA on regulation and the development of technical standards, guidelines and recommendations. They can also submit opinions and advice on any issue related to EIOPA’s tasks.The European Commission has proposed strengthening the mandates of the stakeholder groups as part of its review of the three European supervisory authorities.PensionsEurope has called for the Commission to be in charge of the process for selecting stakeholder group members, instead of the supervisory authorities.Brexit rejig?The new term of the OPSG overlaps with the UK’s departure from the EU, a situation EIOPA drew attention to in its call for applications earlier this year.According to the EIOPA regulation, all members of its stakeholder groups must be nationals of a country in the EU or European Economic Area (EEA).An EIOPA spokesperson told IPE that in case the UK and EU failed to reach a deal on the former’s withdrawal from the bloc, a UK national’s membership of the stakeholder group would be cut short.In case a transition agreement is reached, “it depends on the final conditions of such an arrangement and its impact on the membership in the stakeholder groups of UK nationals if the membership can continue or not,” added the spokesperson.“This can only and will be analysed by EIOPA when the details are known.”Sue Lewis is a trustee director at UK master trust The People’s Pension and the only OPSG member exclusively identified as a UK national.InsuranceEurope’s Jones is identified as a joint UK and Norway national. Norway is in the EEA.The members of the incoming OPSG are listed in full here. Other newcomers include:Christian Lemaire, global head of retirement solutions at Amundi and named as a representative of the Amundi Pension Fund;Olav Jones, deputy director general and director of economics and finance at InsuranceEurope; andSibylle Reichert, head of the Brussels office for PensioenFederatie, the Dutch pension fund associationlast_img read more

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Gillette takes helm at MATC softball coach

By on September 17, 2020

first_imgFor anyone who has had the pleasure of meeting her, it is nearly impossible to imagine former UW softball star Boo Gillette in anything other than cardinal and white — it’s even tough for Gillette herself.So it isn’t hard to believe that after being hired as the new head coach at Madison Area Technical College this Fall, Gillette, a two-time Badger Pride award winner at UW, needed to update her school spirit apparel.”The first day I sped down to the bookstore and bought a ton of MATC shirts and stuff,” the three-time all-conference selection said.When people asked if she was wearing a new shirt, Gillette would try to play it off as if she had been a long-time owner of such WolfPack apparel. However, she was only fooling herself.”I had a tag hanging out the back, so I looked like an idiot,” she said.Not even 12 months removed from completing her career as the most decorated catcher in UW softball history, Gillette is already trying to build a new legacy. This time though, she is trying to do it as a coach and not a player.Gillette, who shares the UW career home run title with fellow 2005 senior Kris Zacher, has been hired as the new head coach at the MATC, though the team will not begin play until 2007. Gillette, the two-time UW team MVP, will be charged with resurrecting a program that has been dormant since 1999, when the sport was shut down for financial reasons.”It’s a program they’ve tried to get going and they have had a lot of trouble keeping it going, and I think it’d be cool to get some new players in there and develop something.” Gillette said. “I get to build a program and coach right out of college and that is my dream job, being a college coach.”Gillette, a bubbly backstop with a motor mouth, a power stroke and an eternal sense of optimism, was easily the most popular Badger during her time, always having the most vocal fan base at home games at Goodman Diamond. She was also the most popular with teammates and coaches because of her strong leadership qualities, which make the transition to coaching a natural move.”Ever since I’ve known her she has talked about being a college coach,” said senior infielder Kaitlin Reiss, a former teammate of Gillette’s and also her roommate. “She’s always been a leader, but I really think she will be able to handle it just fine.”One of the biggest challenges facing the time-limited Gillette will be her ability to recruit well, something that those around her are not the least bit concerned about. But she already has a head start as the gregarious athlete has made many friends in the softball business already.”I know a lot of the Big Ten coaches, because I have played against them all,” Gillette said. “Wisconsin totally embraces their athletic teams. Even if they see you on the news for two seconds, or see your headshot in the newspaper, or see you in Qdoba in your uniform, people know who Badger players are. It’s surprising to see how many contacts I have, because you need that in the coaching world.””Basically, the last head coach we had here couldn’t recruit,” said MATC sports information director Jason Verhelst. “We couldn’t bring in kids and the program floundered. With Boo, we know we are not going to have that problem.”That confidence in Gillette’s ability to recruit speaks volumes about her glowing, charismatic personality, as she is actually a native of South Florida and only now is fully making the transition of moving into the Midwest. Much of her family is making plans to move to Illinois after their home in Florida was badly damaged by Hurricane Wilma this past year.”I love Wisconsin, I love my family, so it’s a great combination,” Gillette said, adding that her family fell in love with the Midwest while traveling to watch their daughter play.It’s a good thing too, since Gillette has hired her father as the first part of her staff. The man she affectionately calls “Pops” will be her assistant coach.Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of Gillette’s position is that she hasn’t even graduated yet.”I joke to my roommates that I’m signing myself on to being more busy than I was when I was a Badger player, if you can believe that,” Gillette said.Currently, beyond preparing the WolfPack for their first season of NCAA competition in seven years, Gillette is still an undergraduate at UW, working as an assistant coach at Edgewood College and working three other jobs on the side in order to save up for graduate school. And you think your 15-credit schedule keeps you busy.”[I’m] pretty much on the go all the time,” Gillette said, before again finding the positives of a situation most undergrads would find unbearable. “It doesn’t give you much time to be lazy and it kind of takes my mind off of missing playing so much, because it is hard not being a ballplayer anymore.”By this time next year, Gillette will be back on the field, this time never leaving the dugout save for the inevitable passionate outburst at an umpire. Passionate about the sport and about life in general, she already knows what her first advice to her players will be.”Play with passion,” Gillette said. “Don’t go out there and play because you have to play or because you have free time. Play because you love the game and that you enjoy it.”So what are Gillette’s goals for this year?”We want to definitely have a fall season this fall, to compete in a couple tournaments and field a solid team by the time spring comes,” Gillette said. “To play .500 ball would be my goal for the first year.”That probably will not be the goal for long, however. Mediocrity is not a word in the softball sparkplug’s vocabulary.And don’t be surprised if sooner than later, you see that Gillette isn’t the only person sporting a brand-new, MATC shirt. With the tags still on, of course.last_img read more

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