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Bishop McHugh Presents the Sound of Music on May 10th

By on May 2, 2021

first_img(Cape May Court House) Students in grades 5 through 8 will perform Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “The Sound of Music” on Wednesday, May 10, 2017 at 7 p.m. at Bishop McHugh Regional Catholic School, 2221 Rt. 9 North, Cape May Court House, N.J. Tickets are $10 per adult and $5 per school age child.Based on actual events, “The Sound of Music” tells the story of Maria who takes a job as a governess while she decides whether to be a nun. She falls in love with the children, and eventually their widowed father. The family flees to Austria in a climactic scene, escaping from Nazi persecution. The original Broadway production opened in 1959 starring Mary Martin as Maria.  In 1965, 20th Century Fox released the film version starring Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer.  The students will be performing the G2K version, which is uniquely adapted for youth performers.Tickets are available at the door on the evening of the performance. For questions, contact the school at (609) 624-1900.Bishop McHugh Regional Catholic School is a PreK-8 regional school in Cape May County with a student-centered curriculum grounded in the Gospel values. For more information, visit http://bishopmchugh.com/mchugh/. The community is invited to “Like” Bishop McHugh on Facebook at www.facebook.com/BishopMcHughRegionalSchool and follow Principal McGuire on Twitter at @BMRCSPrincipal. Pictured (Left to Right) First Row Seated: Thomas Kosloski (Kurt), Gianna Balestriere (Maria), Grace McMahon (Gretl)Second Row Standing: Luke Monichetti (Friedrich), Stella Murphy (Louisa), Camryn Shultheis (Brigitta), Imogene Nuss (Marta)last_img read more

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MSAD 58 hears presentation on proposed budget

By on April 20, 2021

first_imgPHILLIPS – Town officials and Maine School Administrative District 58 directors began their review of a proposed $9.73 million budget for fiscal year 2019-20 Thursday at Phillips Elementary School, with a presentation provided by the superintendent.The administrative budget, proposed at $9,733,262, will be reviewed by the school board and changed in coming months. The board’s budget will then be voted on by MSAD 58 residents at the annual budget meeting and ensuing validation vote. As currently proposed, the $9.73 million administrative budget would represent an increase of $322,245 over the current fiscal year, or 3.42 percent.Superintendent Susan Pratt reviewed the state’s Essential Programs and Services funding formula and its impact on the district, with the governor’s proposed budget currently slated to bring another $191,992 into the district. The state pays roughly 56 percent of MSAD 58’s budget, with the rest paid locally. The district has 634 students attending, with 168 of them living outside the district. MSAD 58 receives tuition for non-resident students; Pratt noted that the district has one of the largest number of tuitioned students in the state.Pratt highlighted one potential source of additional state funding in her presentation: a potential reversal of two years of reduced EPS funding for System Administration. That reduction, from $132 per student down to $94 last year and $47 in the current budget, is linked to an attempt by the state to encourage the regionalization of services. MSAD 58, like a number of local districts, considered regionalizing services but abandoned the effort after few cost savings could be identified. The effective penalty has resulted in a reduction of $97,000 in two years. Pratt said that multiple bills had been submitted to the legislature to do away with the reduction.Another element that could change the budget’s tax impact is new state valuation numbers for MSAD 58’s towns. Last year, the state used a two-year average valuation to determine school funding; this year, it’s back to a three-year average – 2016, 2017 and 2018. The new average results in a $326.9 million valuation for the district towns, a reduction of $875,000. That has meant more state support for the district, Pratt said. However, Kingfield showed a $2 million-plus reduction in valuation while the other three towns showed increases. That would result in a cost shift within the district, Pratt said.New expenditures included in the budget include some transition funding for the district as it finds its next superintendent, as Pratt is retiring at the end of the year; roughly $40,000 to provide the local match to purchase two school buses, with a grant covering 80 percent of the cost of each bus; and funds to remove a buried fuel tank, driveway repairs at Kingfield and other improvements. While the district technically carries no debt service, per the state’s classification, Pratt said that the budget does cover the annual payment on a ten-year, no-interest loan for renovations to PES and Mt. Abram High School.The school board will be taking individual cost centers up in greater detail in the coming weeks.last_img read more

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Tight regulation of marijuana needed in Massachusetts to protect youth

By on March 1, 2021

first_img Read Full Story There’s reason for both enthusiasm and caution when it comes to the state law that will legalize marijuana for those for those age 21 and older that was approved Nov. 8, 2016 by Massachusetts voters, according to a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health tobacco expert.While it’s good that there should be fewer drug-related arrests because of the law— along with the racial disparities that sometimes accompany those arrests —Massachusetts needs strict marijuana regulations to protect youth, Vaughan Rees, director of the Center for Global Tobacco Control and lecturer on social and behavioral sciences at Harvard Chan School, said in a Nov. 14, 2016 Boston Magazine article on the law’s public health implications.“I’m delighted that we’re going to see an end to young people being criminalized and facing jail sentences or prison sentences, and having a criminal record which will impact them, perhaps for life,” Rees said.However, he noted that without tight regulation, the marijuana industry, like the tobacco industry, could “target the youth of Massachusetts with their products to get them hooked, so they will become good customers and use their products, potentially to the detriment of their own health.”last_img read more

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Peace conference to kick off

By on January 26, 2021

first_imgThe student-run conference kicks off Friday evening with keynote speaker John Prendergast, founder of the Enough Project, which is a project to end genocide and crimes against humanity.   “When you go to Notre Dame, it isn’t just about the classes you take or the books you have to read, it’s also about what you choose to do with your education,” Scribner said. “And I believe this conference really gets students to think about that.”  The conference will also feature several panels, including one on careers in peace building and an information fair to show how students can get involved with various peace efforts around the world. “It’s really about putting a tangible grasp on what it means to be a peacebuilder and promote peace worldwide,” Alex Hellmuth, senior and conference co-chair, said. “We want to show how it’s possible to work for peace in all different areas.” Nearly 300 students from across the world will meet on campus this weekend to discuss practical methods of peace building at the 18th annual Student Peace Conference, sponsored by the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.  This year’s conference — to be held in the Hesburgh Center for International Studies — is entitled “Invest in Peace: Uncovering the Practicality of Peacebuilding.” “He is a very engaging and interactive speaker, so it will definitely be interesting,” she said.   Scribner said Prendergast will discuss his experience in Africa and the role of conflict minerals in the Congo in his address. “We’re really excited that he was able to come,” said Kelsey Scribner, co-chair along with Hellmuth. “He has a lot of experience with peacebuilding in Africa and was even an advisor for the Clinton administration.”  She said “Invest in Peace” focuses on making practical solutions and demonstrating what works in policy implementation and development.   “Our goal was to develop a theme that was more inclusive,” Hellmuth said.  “Ultimately, we are trying to reach out to more people and make the conference more interdisciplinary.”  Both Peace Studies majors, Hellmuth and Scribner said the conference is an important thing for the University to host because it encourages students to engage in social justice and highlights elements of Catholic Social Teaching. Although meal registration closed on March 23, anyone interested in attending any of the other conference events is still able to do so.last_img read more

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BS(A) strikes again

By on December 18, 2020

first_imgWhat would happen to your credit union if federal regulators and prosecutors determined that over a five year period you processed over 30 million remittances to Mexico, assigned two employees to monitor these transactions, filed a total of 9 SARS, ignored employee concerns that you were violating federal law, and then admitted to “willfully violating” The Bank Secrecy Act? I’ll tell you what would happen: Your credit union would be out of business, your top executives would be banned from the industry, and you might even find yourself on the front page of the Wall Street Journal. After all, Bethex Federal Credit Union no longer exists.Unfortunately evidence suggests that the same rules don’t apply to the largest institutions. Yesterday the justice department announced that it was entering into a non-prosecution agreement with Banamex USA, a subsidiary of Citigroup, to settle claims that it violated the Bank Secrecy Act from 2007-2012 by facilitating remittance transfers to Mexico without complying with some of the most basic requirements of the Bank Secrecy Act. The price of its “get-out-of-jail free” card is $97.4 million. This is in addition to the earlier fines paid to the FDIC. Citgroup has also announced that it was shutting down the offending bank’s operations- better late then never, I guess.The bank’s intentional oversight had real live consequences as the Non Prosecution agreement explains. “As a result of these compliance program failures, BUSA failed to file suspicious activity reports (“SARs”) on suspicious remittance transactions to Mexico that fit typologies consistent with illegal activity, such as human smuggling, fraud, and drug trafficking.” continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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EH heads for new City tower battle

By on October 20, 2020

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

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Tropical oasis up for sale

By on September 28, 2020

first_img58 Gerard St, Currajong.The property itself has two bedrooms, one bathroom, three car accommodation and is on the market for $299,000.It’s on a 452 sqm block and the house has a front patio that leads tot he living room, tongue and groove walls and shaded windows.There is a new kitchen with a gas stove, rangehood, larger corner pantry and plenty of cupboard space.Helen Munro Property selling agent Margaret Hill said it was one of the best residential gardens she had seen in Townsville.“This is the most tropical garden I’ve had the privilege of selling,” she said. “To get this variety of these gingers and heliconias you would usually have to go to Mission Beach.” 58 Gerard St, Currajong.THIS just might be one of Townsville’s best residential tropical gardens.The tropical oasis at 58 Gerard St in Currajong is now looking for a new owner 10 years after the impressive garden was first established.The garden is filled with palms, various varieties of bamboo, heliconias and gingers while there is also an aquatonic garden that not only produces vegetables but can also be used to farm fish. 58 Gerard St will be open for inspection on Sunday from 11.30am-12pm. For more information call Margaret Hill on 0439 716 340. 58 Gerard St, Currajong Leigh Heerschop is selling his house on Gerard St, Currajong, which features a lush tropical garden that he has created.Walking into the backyard the temperature instantly drops due to the shade provided by the canopy.Bright tropical flowers are contrasted against lush greenery with bunches of bamboo shooting up towards the sky.More from news01:21Buyer demand explodes in Townsville’s 2019 flood-affected suburbs12 Sep 202001:21‘Giant surge’ in new home sales lifts Townsville property market10 Sep 2020Owner and green thumb Leigh Heerschop said there was only a sole palm tree in the garden when he first moved in and he had invested about $50,000 in creating the lush backyard.It’s a tropical oasis and it’s actually really easy to maintain once you have it established,” he said. “I had to find a lot of the plants online so for example the painted bamboo I had to buy off eBay. I’ll be sad to leave the garden but I can start again and make another one that’s bigger and better.”last_img read more

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Host Families Needed For Exchange Students

By on September 24, 2020

first_imgHost families are needed for the 2014-2015 school year. Students are available from many different countries and families choose their student based on common interests, religious preferences, gender, or other characteristics.To become a host family, one only needs to be able to provide room and board and transportation to school, including the school bus.  On-line applications are available at Council for Education Travel website or by contacting  local coordinator Betty Bourquein at 934-4454.Students come with a proficiency in English, their own insurance, and their own spending money. They are to become a member of your family responsible for following the house rules, maintaining grades at school, doing light chores, and participating in family activities.“One needs to think globally but act locally to enjoy the benefits of this lifelong relationship with someone from another part of the world,” Bourquein said.last_img read more

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