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Two journalists found innocent after a month of jail, another sentenced to a fine

By on June 12, 2021

first_img Dimas Dzikodo, editor of the Togolese weekly L’Evénement, was released in the morning of 24 July, after gathering 500,000 CFA francs (about 760 euros) to pay the fine he was sentenced to, on 22 July for “trying to put out false news”. ————————————-23.07.2003A Lomé court on 22 July ordered the release of Evégnon and Kpakpabia, but found Dzikodo guilty of “trying to put out false news” and fined him 500,000 CFA francs (about 760 euros). Evégnon and Kpakpabia were freed in the morning of 23 July, while Dzikodo has to pay the fine first.”We regret they have been freed so late, especially as two of them were found innocent,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard. “We also deplore the conviction of Dzikodo on an entirely bogus charge which opens the way to all kinds of abuses. We are outraged at the physical attacks on Dzikodo and Kpakpabia while they were being interrogated.”The press freedom organisation also deplored the slowness of officials in obeying the court order to free them. Evégnon and Kpakpabia were not released until the next day, though the prosecutor had ordered their release on the previous evening, and Dzikodo was held, in violation of the law, until he had paid the fine.The three journalists were arrested on 14 and 15 June. Dzikodo was picked up in a cybercafé where he was scanning and storing pictures of injured people. Kpakpabia was also arrested there with similar photos. Evégnon was accused of handing the pictures to editor Dzikodo.After being held 10 days in cells at police headquarters, they were sent to Lomé prison where they were incarcerated for over a month. Dzikodo and Kpakpabia were beaten by policemen during intensive interrogation. News TogoAfrica News July 25, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two journalists found innocent after a month of jail, another sentenced to a fine March 11, 2021 Find out more TogoAfrica Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts RSF_en Newscenter_img September 15, 2020 Find out more Organisation Togo court upholds “baseless and disproportionate” newspaper closures News Togolese authorities urged to lift newspaper’s four-month suspension Follow the news on Togo Convicting “petrolgate” journalist of defamation would be disastrous, RSF says March 8, 2021 Find out more to go furtherlast_img read more

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Two private newspapers closed down since start of the year

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first_imgNews SudanAfrica Sudan : Press freedom still in transition a year after Omar al-Bashir’s removal News SudanAfrica to go further Coronavirus infects press freedom in Africa RSF_en Help by sharing this information April 6, 2020 Find out more January 17, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Two private newspapers closed down since start of the year News News The year began in Sudan in the same vein as previous ones, with new censorship moves. Although the country has a diverse media and enjoys some freedom of speech, the Khartoum authorities have stepped up efforts to silence publications that irritate them.Within the past two weeks, two independent and opposition newspapers, Alwan and Rai al-Shaab, have been closed by security forces without explanation.“These latest two newspaper closures show the government of President Omar Hassan al-Bashir has yet to overcome his chronically repressive instincts aimed at silencing the media,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We fear these examples are merely the start of many and call on the authorities to put an end to this spiral of repression.”The press freedom organization demands that the two dailies be allowed to resume publication as soon as possible. On 14 January, police raided the offices of the Arabic-language daily Alwan. Officers closed up the premises and took an inventory of all equipment without giving an explanation. A day earlier, the paper’s editor Hussein Khogli was told by telephone it would be closed down, after copies had been seized over the preceding two days. Receive email alerts The closure order was believed to have been given by Mohamed Atta, the head of the National Intelligence Security Services, and was believed to be linked to the publication of an interview with an Islamist political leader, Lubaba Alfadli. The newspaper was the target of similar suspensions in 2008 and 2009. On 2 January, it was the Arabic-language Rai al-Shaab, the official newspaper of the opposition Popular National Congress Party led by Hassan al-Turabi, that was the authorities’ target for suspension. Its premises were closed and 15,000 copies of the paper were seized from its printing plant by NISS officials. Its manager, Nagi Dahab, has received no explanation.The closure could be as a result of the publication of an interview with Gibril Ibrahim, the spokesman for the Darfur rebel group Justice and Equality Movement concerning the difference in how prisoners were treated by the JEM and by the Sudanese government.The Sudanese Media Centre, a state-linked website, said the action was taken because the newspaper’s behaviour violated the ethical and professional standards of the journalists’ code of conduct.The NISS previously closed down Rai al-Shaab in 2010. Its deputy editor Abuzar Ali Al-Amin spent several months in prison, where he suffered ill-treatment. The newspaper resumed publication last October after a court overruled its closure.Photo : Rai al-Shaab (Ashraz Shazli / AFP) Covid-19 in Africa: RSF joins a coalition of civil society organizations to demand the release of imprisoned journalists on the continent April 10, 2020 Find out more Organisation Follow the news on Sudan March 29, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Tough measures used to gag media in run-up to elections

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first_img EgyptMiddle East – North Africa February 1, 2021 Find out more November 25, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Tough measures used to gag media in run-up to elections Detained woman journalist pressured by interrogator, harassed by prison staff Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders condemns an increase in measures to control news and information and suppress freedom of expression in the run-up to the parliamentary elections scheduled for 28 November. The measures, including practices regarded as a thing of the past, constitute a major step backwards after the progress seen in recent years. We fear even more repression in the run-up to the presidential election due to be held next year. Forced disappearanceReporters Without Borders is very worried about what may have happened to Attia Mohamed Mahmoud Abu-l-Ela, a freelance journalist employed by the Al Jazeera bureau in Cairo, who covered the use of violence by police and supporters of the ruling National Democratic Party against opposition politicians and their supporters at an election rally in Al-Sharqeya province on 20 November.Pursued by the police, Abu-l-Ela initially managed to get away but was arrested him at his home in the village El-Salam the following morning. No arrest order was shown by the police, who broke furniture while searching his home and confiscated journalistic equipment. There has been no news of him since then. Reporters Without Borders calls for his immediate release.Trumped-up chargeReporters Without Borders also reiterates its call for the immediate release of Youssef Shaaban, an Alexandria-based reporter for the independent online newspaper Al-Badil who was arrested while covering a demonstration on 20 November by residents of the Alexandria neighbourhood of Abu Suleiman, who were protesting against plans for their eviction.Shaaban, who is also a human rights activist, was arrested when he photographed a policeman beating protesters, Reporters Without Borders has learned. He was taken to a police station in the Alexandria district of Raml, where intelligence officers charged him with drug trafficking (http://en.rsf.org/egypte-journalist-held-on-trumped-up-drug-23-11-2010,38871.html).His case was immediately sent to the prosecutor’s office, which had him detained for an additional four days, supposedly for the purposes of further investigation. Since then, a further two-week extension to his detention has been ordered. Meanwhile Shaaban has still not been able to talk to his lawyers.Reporters Without Borders fears that he is being mistreated. The drug charge was clearly fabricated with the aim of silencing a journalist known for his outspoken reporting just a few days ahead of the parliamentary elections. This use of Tunisian-style methods to gag the media is very disturbing.Intimidation of journalists covering opposition campaignThe government’s campaign of harassment and intimidation of the Muslim Brotherhood in advance of the elections has also affected journalists covering this opposition party’s election campaign.Ashraf Khalil, a reporter for the English-language edition of the daily Al-Masry Al-Youm, was intercepted and threatened by state security police on 22 November after interviewing Mohammed Beltagui, a Muslim Brotherhood candidate for reelection as parliamentary representative of Shubra Al-Kheima, a district to the north of Cairo.As Khalil and a fellow-journalist left the district in a taxi, they were stopped by state security police. “They told us to get out of the taxi and demanded our identity papers and press cards,” Khalil told Reporters Without Borders. “In an aggressive tone, they also asked us for our authorization to work as journalists in this neighbourhood. I repeatedly explained that my press card had been issued by the ministry of communication and information.“We quickly realized that our official press cards meant nothing to these people. We spent more than half an hour like this, standing in a dark street surrounded by a dozen men in uniform who kept repeating that they were just following orders without bothering to tell us what those orders were.”Increased government control over broadcast mediaReporters Without Borders condemns regulations issued at the start of November designed to restrict live TV broadcasts. According to the latest communication and information ministry provisions, any media company wanting to do live broadcasting must obtain a permit from an official and pay 5,000 dollars (3,730 euros). But the ministry did not identify the official, specify how long the permit will be valid, or explain how to renew it.At the same time, many satellite TV broadcasters have received letters from the ministry ordering them to do all their live broadcasting from studios in 6th of October City, a satellite city 30 km southeast of Cairo.The authorities also launched a campaign on 11 October to control SMS messaging. Companies that send large amounts of SMS messages to mobile phones must now obtain a licence from the Telecommunications Regulation Authority. Other SMS content suppliers including political parties and news services must do the same. The licences can cost up to 88,000 dollars (65,670 euros).TV broadcasting closures, dismissalsOn 19 October, the communication and information ministry dropped many privately-owned TV stations from the government-controlled TV satellite operator Nilesat and threatened others with the same measure. Two TV presenters, Alaa Sadeq and Ibrahim Eissa, were dropped at the start of October after criticising the authorities (http://en.rsf.org/egypt-authorities-tighten-control-over-21-10-2010,38638.html). RSF_en Follow the news on Egypt News Newscenter_img Al Jazeera journalist Mahmoud Hussein back home after four years in prison Less press freedom than ever in Egypt, 10 years after revolution Organisation News January 22, 2021 Find out more EgyptMiddle East – North Africa News to go further February 6, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Ex-presidential guard member threatens RSF correspondent

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first_img RSF_en Receive email alerts to go further Central African RepublicAfrica News December 13, 2019 Find out more Organisation Sub-Lieutenant Dogo, reputed to be close to President François Bozizé since he assumed power, is notorious amongst the residents of Bangui for his cruelty. He was stripped of his rank and returned to civilian life on 21 September 2005 for “indiscipline and dishonour in the army and abuse of authority”, after the bodies of two soldiers who had been arrested by his men a few days earlier, were discovered. Following this incident, the head of state reminded the armed forces to act with “humanism” and “respect for human rights.” News Help by sharing this information After the 4 January 2006 publication of an article entitled “Year 2006 Starts in Pain and Tears” in “The Citoyen”, the daily’s director Maka Gbossokoto received a phone call at 6:15 p.m. (local time) from sub-lieutenant Jean-Célestin Dogo, an ex-“Liberator” (the name given to those who assisted in the 2003 rebellion that brought François Bozizé to power). The soldier, recently ousted from the military, expressed his anger at a recent report in “The Citoyen” about the fatal settling of a 3 January dispute in a northern district of Bangui that degenerated into confrontations between police and citizens. He insulted the journalist, who is also an RSF correspondent and president of the Central African Journalists Union (UJCA) and ended the conversation in saying, “We will meet and see.” Follow the news on Central African Republiccenter_img News Reporters without Borders has condemned threats made against Maka Gbossokoto, the director of the private daily newspaper “Le Citoyen” (“The Citizen”), by a presidential guard sub-lieutenant who was recently dismissed from the army and is known for his brutality. RSF decries arbitrary blocking of two CAR news websites Central African RepublicAfrica January 9, 2006 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Ex-presidential guard member threatens RSF correspondent Six years on, same unanswered questions about French journalist’s death in CAR News April 6, 2021 Find out more CAR policeman who shot reporter must be punished, RSF says May 13, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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RSF questions the true reasons for the arrest of a Burmese journalist

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first_img April 18, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 RSF questions the true reasons for the arrest of a Burmese journalist February 23, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information RSF_en RSF demands release of detained Indian journalist Siddique Kappan, hospitalised with Covid-19 Organisation IndiaAsia – Pacific Follow the news on India News Newscenter_img to go further India: RSF denounces “systemic repression” of Manipur’s media March 3, 2021 Find out more IndiaAsia – Pacific News Indian journalist wrongly accused of “wantonly” inaccurate reporting On 17 April, Soe Myint was released under bail by a Barasat court (north of Calcutta).______________________________________________________________ In a letter sent to the Indian Minister of External Affairs, Jaswant Singh, Reporters sans frontières (Reporters Without Borders – RSF) asked for the real reasons for the arrest of Burmese journalist Soe Myint, managing editor of the Mizzima press agency. “We are justified in asking whether the arrest of this journalist, reputed for his reporting on human rights violations in Burma, has a direct relation with the diplomatic rapprochement between New Delhi and Rangoon. The fact that this arrest occurred twelve years after his crime, but just one week after your visit to Burma, leads us to ask for detailed explanations on this arrest,” said Robert Ménard, RSF’s General Secretary. RSF asked the minister to guarantee the safety of Burmese journalists exiled in India and their right to inform. RSF also reminded that there is no press freedom in Burma, and that at least 17 journalists are in Burmese jails for peacefully defending democracy.According to information obtained by RSF, Soe Myint, managing editor of the Mizzima press agency and vice secretary of the Burma Media Association (BMA, an affiliate of the RSF Network), was arrested at his home in New Delhi on 10 April 2002. He was transferred to Calcutta where he was held for five days. This detention was renewed on 15 April. Authorities say that he must face charges of hijacking a Thai Airways plane, flying from Calcutta to Rangoon, on 19 November 1990. This unarmed hijacking was done to attract international public opinion to human rights violations perpetrated by the Burmese junta. After spending three months in a Calcutta jail (West Bengal), Soe Myint was released. In exchange, he was supposed to check in regularly with judicial authorities in Calcutta. In 1993, he obtained refugee status from the High Commissioner for Refugees. In 1995, the General Secretary of the province of West Bengal sent a letter to the Indian government asking that the charges be dropped, since the hijacking was committed without violence. He never received a response.In 1998 Soe Myint, now 35 years old, founded Mizzima, a press agency focusing on Burma, which was very critical to the military government. Many international media use news provided by this agency, especially radio stations broadcasting in Burmese. According to Burmese and Indian sources, the Rangoon junta may have pressured the Indian government to arrest this dissident. Soe Myint’s lawyer, Nandita Haksar, told RSF that her client had been questioned about his activities as a journalist, especially by two men in the CID offices who refused to identify themselves. April 27, 2021 Find out more Newslast_img read more

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Journalist on Guayaquil radio was killed for personal reasons

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first_img News RSF_en Coronavirus “information heroes” – journalism that saves lives Raúl Rodríguez, deputy heads of news on Radio Sucre, was apparently murdered for personal reasons and not in connection with his work, prosecutor in charge of the investigation, Antonio Galiardo, told Agence France-Presse on 27 June. He said the journalist’s mistress, Luz Rivera, was believed to have paid a hit-man 4,500 dollars to kill him. The hired killer was reportedly Johnny Jimmy Medina, arrested on 26 June. He was found to have a bullet wound that appeared to confirm his involvement in the exchange of fire in which Rodriguez died on 23 June, close to Luz Rivera’s home. A total of seven people have so far been arrested and charged in connection with the investigation.______________________________24.06.08 – Radio journalist, target of two previous attacks, gunned down in GuayaquilReporters Without Borders hopes that yesterday’s murder of Radio Sucre deputy news director Raúl Rodríguez in the western city of Guayaquil will be quickly solved. The motive has yet to be established but Rodríguez, 64, had been the target of attacks in the past.“Rodríguez carried a gun because he was getting threats and had been attacked twice,” the press freedom organisation said. “He had just a few friends, partly because he had criticised corruption so much on the air. The investigation should take all this into account, even if the evidence gathered so far does not establish that his murder was linked to his work as a journalist.”The attack took place at about 7:20 a.m. yesterday as Rodríguez returned to his home in the northern district of Guayacanes after presenting his early morning programme “Good Morning Ecuador” on Radio Sucre. He was getting out of his jeep when he was attacked by two gunmen wearing hats. One of them – who was accompanied by a woman, according to some accounts – shot him in the back. The other emerged from behind a corner and shot him head on. Rodríguez tried to take cover behind a parked car and, although wounded, pulled out his own gun in order to return fire. Police believe a total of 13 shots were fired.According the daily El Universo, the assailants fled in a Lada taxi with the licence number GNZ-119. Hit in the neck, thorax and left leg, Rodríguez died as a result of injuries in a nearby hospital to which he was rushed by a relative he had been about to visit. After 20 years presenting radio HCJB2, an evangelical radio station he founded, Rodríguez joined Radio Sucre in 1984 and became its deputy news director. He hosted three programmes – “Good Morning Ecuador,” “News Reports” and a Saturday new programme. His family said he was often outspoken on the air in his condemnation of alleged local government corruption and his criticism of the national government. A social conservative, he also criticised homosexuality and abortion.His family said he occasionally received telephone threats and shots were fired at the facade of his house in 2005. The following year, six men tried to kill him as he was parking his car. June 30, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist on Guayaquil radio was killed for personal reasons April 10, 2020 Find out more News Organisation Reporters Without Borders hopes for quick progress in the investigation into yesterday’s murder of Radio Sucre deputy news director Raúl Rodríguez in the neighbourhood where he lived in Guayaquil. The motive has yet to be established but he was outspoken on the air and had been the target of attacks in the past. News Coronavirus: State measures must not allow surveillance of journalists and their sources Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information EcuadorAmericas EcuadorAmericas to go further June 15, 2020 Find out more December 24, 2019 Find out more News Two months before Assange’s extradition hearing, RSF calls for his release on humanitarian grounds and for US Espionage Act charges to be dropped Follow the news on Ecuadorlast_img read more

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Grim day of violent attacks on the media in second round of polling

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first_img Al Jazeera journalist Mahmoud Hussein back home after four years in prison EgyptMiddle East – North Africa EgyptMiddle East – North Africa Help by sharing this information News Receive email alerts The information ministry also conveyed a complaint to the electoral high commission against the pan-Arab channel al-Hurra, on the basis of the same allegations. The complaint was also referred to the chief prosecutor, but no suspension was ordered. to go further Journalists charged with defamation The top prosecutor, Abdul-Meguid Mahmoud, on 5 December sent two journalists from the independent daily al-Shorouq for trial before the criminal court charged with “insulting and defaming an official in the exercise of his duty”, after it carried an interview the previous day with NDP candidate Momena Kamel, just elected to the al-Badrashin constituency in the Guizeh governorate. During the interview, journalist Hisham el-Meyani questioned her about statements made by the Justice Minister to the electoral high commission relating to fraud cases in the constituency where she had just won her seat. The deputy told the journalist it was absurd before she condemned him as “madman, liar, psychologically unstable and reckless”, and that “intellectually he belonged to the Muslim Brothers”. The same day the deputy complained about the journalist to his editor in chief, Amr Khafagy. The following day, the two journalists and the deputy were questioned by the top prosecutor. Momena Kamel was interviewed very briefly while the two journalists were questioned for nearly six hours. They were both charged and released on bail of 20,000 Egyptian pounds (2,600 euros). The first date for their hearing has been set for 18 December 2010. They face from six months to three years in prison and a fine of 10,000 Egyptian pounds (1,300 euros). Journalists attacked by NPD militants and security forces Ayman Ibrahim, journalist on the government-run magazine al-Idhaa wa al-Tilfaza was beaten up by “baltaguis” (thugs), recruited by the independent candidate Mahmoud Mosleh, when he took photos of them in the act of committing fraud at a polling station at a boys’ middle school in the city of Zefta in the governorate of al-Gharbiyah, in the delta region north of Cairo. They threw themselves on Ibrahim when they saw he had taken shots of them, raining blows on him and ripping his clothes. The journalist said that his possessions and equipment were stolen. He laid a complaint at Zefta police station. His possessions were returned to him, minus his money, and the photos he had taken had been deleted from his camera. A journalist on the same weekly, Omar Aammar, was covering voting at a polling station at al-Rashad school in the al-Matareya district, east of Cairo was struck by a police officer when he refused his order to leave the polling station. Aammar tried but failed to lay a complaint at the district police station. Video journalist Ahmed Abdul-Fattah of the daily al-Masry al-Youm was brutally beaten by NDP militants and “baltaguis” in their pay, in Qabreet village, in Fowa city, in the governorate of Kafr-el-Sheikh, north of Cairo. All his equipment was stolen and he was left lying on the ground covered in bruises. His colleague, Omar al-Sheikh, correspondent for al-Masry al-Youm in Beni Swaif governorate south of Cairo, was covering voting at a polling station in Baroot primary school when he was attacked by militant supporters of the NDP candidate Abdul-Khair Abdul-‘Alem.Journalists and representatives of civil society organisations were refused entry to the Abou Leila primary school in the city of Atmida, in the governorate of Daqahleya, in the delta region north of Cairo. Police refused to accept the validity of their accreditation from the electoral high commission, telling them that only those issued by the police station in the constituency were valid. The photographer for the daily al-Masry al-Youm, Hossam al-Hawary, tried to get in without permission and was immediately attacked by NDP supporters and “baltaguis” who threatened to stab him to death. A team from the independent weekly al-Youm al-Sabe’ was attacked at the same spot by “baltaguis” and NDP supporters. Journalist Mohamed Haggag was forced into the polling station at knife-point. He was held there and manhandled for half an hour before being released. Ahmed Ismail, a photojournalist for the same media was beaten by the same individuals outside the building. Sherif al-Deeb, also a reporter for al-Youm al-Sabe’, was threatened by NDP supporters, “baltaguis” and security staff. They were all finally expelled from the city by force. Journalists were prevented from covering clashes that broke out between supporters of Essam Abdul Razeq and Mohamed al-Halawany, both NDP candidates for the constituency in Kafr Saqr, in the governorate or al-Sharqiyah, 85 kilometres east of Cairo. A correspondent for the daily al-Youm al-Sabe’, Iman Mechanna, was assaulted because she took photos of the incident. Police refused to allow journalists to enter polling stations in Shoubra el-Kheima in the governorate of al-Qalyubiya, in Cairo’s northern suburbs, despite showing their accreditation, arguing that for security reasons, only voters were allowed access. Gamal Abu Eliou, a reporter for the independent weekly al-Karama, was prevented throughout the day on 5 December from covering elections in polling stations in Armant in the governorate of Luxor, south of Cairo.Security forces on 5 December banned a demonstration planned by the April 6 Movement in Tahrir Square, Cairo to protect against massive electoral fraud and to urge voters to boycott the second round of polling. All gatherings were banned for fear of demonstrators organising, including at bus stations and the entrance to shops. Organisation December 9, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Grim day of violent attacks on the media in second round of polling News News Information ministry targets satellite channels Nilesat on 3 December suspended al-Fraen TV for two weeks for “violation of the media code of ethics and rules of covering elections”, based on a decision by the Media Free Zone administration, in Sixth of October City. In the same way, the director of the electoral high commission, Sayed Abdul-Aziz Omar, sent the top prosecutor a complaint from the information minister, Anas al-Fekki, against the channel for violating the principles of election coverage. January 22, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders said today it had recorded numerous cases of deliberate obstruction of journalists trying to cover the second round of legislative elections on 5 December, just as it had in the first round on 28 November. The landslide victory of the ruling National Democratic Party (NDP) was no longer in doubt after massive fraud during the first round, condemned unanimously by observers in Egypt. Tension levels were slightly down, however, a large number of journalists were attacked by NDP militants and the security forces in the course of polling day. A fresh upsurge in tension and censorship may well be on the cards during the coming months in the run-up to the presidential election, due at the end of 2011. February 6, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Egypt Detained woman journalist pressured by interrogator, harassed by prison staff Less press freedom than ever in Egypt, 10 years after revolution RSF_en February 1, 2021 Find out more The website of the Muslim Brothers (Ikhwan Online) was inaccessible from within Egypt from 8am to 7pm and then again until midnight, on 5 December. The same censorship was applied to the Brothers’ online forum al-Moltaqa (http://www.ikhwan.net/forum/).Seven other websites were also censored for 24 hours: http://www.shahid2010.com/ (inaccessible)http://shababelikhwan.net/ib/index.php (accessible in a few parts of the country)http://www.sharkiaonline.com/ (accessible in a few parts of the country)http://www.amlalommah.net/ (inaccessible)http://www.nowabikhwan.com/ (accessible in a few parts of the country)http://www.egyptwindow.net/ (inaccessible)http://www.ikhwanweb.com/ (inaccessible)The authorities, particularly the Information and Decision Support Center (IDSC) that comes under the council of ministers, were behind the blocking of these sites in collaboration with the country’s internet services providers (TEDATA, ETISALAT and LINK DSL). last_img read more

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US – #WeeklyAddress July 24-30: Sarah Palin plans to subpoena 23 New York Times reporters

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first_img News News June 7, 2021 Find out more RSF_en April 28, 2021 Find out more June 3, 2021 Find out more 1. Sarah Palin plans to subpoena 23 New York Times reporters in defamation caseAs part of her defamation lawsuit against The New York Times, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin plans to subpoena 23 Times reporters, editors and employees, according to court documents released Wednesday, July 26. Lawyers for The Times, motioning for the lawsuit to be dismissed, argued that most of the 23 reporters had nothing to do with the editorial over which Palin is suing, and that the subpoenas are part of her efforts to get “documents that might reveal, among other things, their ‘negative feelings’ toward her.” The Times also told the judge that Palin plans to request “every internal communication it had about her since 2011.” Palin’s lawyers also represented Hulk Hogan during his lawsuit against Gawker over a sex tape the website published of him, using internal communications between Gawker’s staff to push their case.2. Capitol Police order reporters to delete photos and videos of protesters in Senate hallCapitol Police arrested protesters outside of the Senate Chamber on Tuesday, July 25, and reportedly told journalists to delete photographs and videos documenting the arrests. Andrew Desiderio, a reporter for The Daily Beast, tweeted “Capitol Police made me delete the video I recorded,” and Huffington Post reporter Jennifer Bendery, who was also in the hall that day, tweeted that an officer pushed her when she tried to get a look at the protesters. According to Congress rules, photography and video recording is prohibited outside the Senate and House chambers, which is where the protests took place. Organizations such as RSF, the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, PEN, and the ACLU have criticized the Capitol Police for compelling reporters to delete their photographs and videos as a violation of the First and Fourth Amendments.3. Trump accuses The Washington Post of being Amazon’s lobbying toolPresident Donald Trump continued his tirade against The Washington Post early in the week on Twitter. On Monday, July 24, Trump accused the Post of fabricating facts in a story about ending a US program to aid certain Syrian rebel groups to fight Assad. The Post confirmed that the White House had not disputed any facts when the story ran a week prior. Later that day, Trump tweeted: “Is Fake News Washington Post being used as a lobbyist weapon against Congress to keep Politicians from looking into Amazon no-tax monopoly?” Though Amazon pays taxes, Trump had made similar accusations during his presidential campaign. The Washington Post is not owned by Amazon, but by the company’s CEO, Jeff Bezos.4. Scaramucci tells reporter he wants to “kill all the leakers”During an explosive phone call with New Yorker reporter Ryan Lizza on Wednesday night, July 26, newly-appointed White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci said he wants to “f—ing kill all the leakers” so he can get the president’s agenda back on track. Scaramucci called Lizza that night to find out who leaked to him the names of the president’s dinner guests that evening, which Lizza had tweeted. Lizza did not reveal his source to Scaramucci.The United States ranks 43rd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index after falling 2 places in the last year.For the latest updates, follow RSF on twitter @RSF_en News WhatsApp blocks accounts of at least seven Gaza Strip journalists Follow the news on United States Receive email alerts United StatesAmericas Condemning abusesProtecting sources Judicial harassment Below are the most notable incidents regarding threats to press freedom in the US during the week of July 24 – 30: News Help by sharing this information Facebook’s Oversight Board is just a stopgap, regulation urgently needed, RSF says NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say United StatesAmericas Condemning abusesProtecting sources Judicial harassment July 31, 2017 US – #WeeklyAddress July 24-30: Sarah Palin plans to subpoena 23 New York Times reporters to go further Organisation last_img read more

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Young Syrian press photographer killed in Aleppo

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first_img Employed by Images Live, a British photo agency, Osama Jumaa was injured while covering a Syrian government artillery bombardment of the Aleppo neighbourhood of Al-Mashad. He was inside an ambulance when it was hit by a shell that killed both him and the driver.“We condemn bombardments by the Syrian regime’s army that target civilians, including journalists covering the conflict, and we remind all parties to the conflict that they are required by UN Security Council Resolution 2222 of 2015 and the Geneva Conventions to guarantee journalists’ safety,” said Alexandra El Khazen, the head of RSF’s Middle East desk. Jumaa was trained in war reporting by the International Photo Media agency, of which Images Live is an offshoot. Images Live agency, issued a statement paying tribute to the “impartiality and independence” of Jumaa’s reporting. It said Jumaa had gone to Al-Zebdyeh to cover the provision of emergency services to the civilian population during the bombardment by the Syrian regular army. Syria is one of the world’s deadliest countries for journalists. According to RSF’s tally, around 200 journalists and citizen-journalists have been killed since the start of the conflict in March 2011, four of them this year. Last year, RSF appealed to the UN Security Council to refer war crimes against journalists in Syria and Iraq to the International Criminal Court. Syria is ranked 177th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2016 World Press Freedom Index. to go further Organisation Osama Jumaa – Images Live March 8, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is saddened to learn of 19-year-old Syrian press photographer Osama Jumaa’s death in the northern city of Aleppo on 5 June and deplores the fact that the violence of the conflict in Syria makes it impossible for journalists to work safely. News Toll of ten years of civil war on journalists in Syria March 12, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts February 3, 2021 Find out morecenter_img Follow the news on Syria SyriaMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abuses SyriaMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abuses Damascus TV presenter arrested under cyber-crime law News Wave of Kurdish arrests of Syrian journalists News June 10, 2016 – Updated on November 18, 2016 Young Syrian press photographer killed in Aleppo Help by sharing this information Newslast_img read more

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More journalists arrested as novelist goes on trial

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first_img TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Condemning abuses WomenJudicial harassmentImprisonedFreedom of expressionCouncil of Europe News News Turkey’s never-ending judicial persecution of former newspaper editor to go further RSF_en Organisation April 28, 2021 Find out more TurkeyEurope – Central Asia Condemning abuses WomenJudicial harassmentImprisonedFreedom of expressionCouncil of Europe Update: The Istanbul court ordered the conditional release of Aslı Erdoğan, Necmiye Alpay and Zana Kaya at the end of the first hearing today. They continue to be defendants in the case and are still facing a possible life sentence if found guilty. They are also banned from leaving the country. Reporters Without Borders (RSF) urges the judicial authorities to lift these restrictions, abandon the proceedings against them and to quickly release all other journalists held in the absence of evidence against them. Credit: Ozan Kose / AFP Help by sharing this information center_img Journalists threatened with imprisonment under Turkey’s terrorism law December 29, 2016 – Updated on December 30, 2016 More journalists arrested as novelist goes on trial News Receive email alerts Follow the news on Turkey Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on the Turkish authorities to stop criminalizing journalists and to release Ahmet Şık, a leading investigative reporter who was arrested today, and five other journalists who were arrested four days ago. Well-known novelist and newspaper columnist Aslı Erdoğan meanwhile goes on trial in Istanbul today along with eight other journalists and intellectuals.“Not content with reducing pluralism to almost nothing and holding the world record for the number of journalists in prison, the Turkish authorities continue to throttle journalism more and more every day,” said Johann Bihr, the head of RSF’s Eastern Europe and Central Asia desk.“Five months after the coup attempt, the government keeps on using the state of emergency and the terrorism law to silence its critics. Given the scale and frequency of the arrests, there will soon be no one left to tell the world what is happening in Turkey.”Arrested at his Istanbul home at dawn today, Ahmet Şık is charged with “propaganda for a terrorist organization” and “denigrating the Turkish Republic and its institutions” in a dozen tweets, five articles for the opposition daily Cumhuriyet and what he said at a public event organized jointly with the European parliament.His comments criticized the government’s handling of the Kurdish issue and terrorist threat, and Turkey’s arms deliveries to Islamist groups in Syria. His lawyer, Can Atalay, told RSF that he has been denied access to his client – a curtailment of rights permitted under the state of emergency in effect since July.Şık has been awarded many prizes for his investigative reporting, including UNESCO’s Guillermo Cano prize in 2014. He spent more than a year in preventive detention on trumped-up charges in 2011 and 2012, which RSF condemned in a report at the time.Aslı Erdoğan’s trialAslı Erdoğan is one of nine contributors and employees of Özgür Gündem, a daily newspaper closed by decree in August, whose trial at the justice palace in the Istanbul district of Çağlayan starts today.Five of the defendants escaped arrest and are being tried in absentia. Erdoğan will appear in court along with linguist and fellow columnist Necmiye Alpay, editor-in-chief İnan Kızılkaya and reporter Zana Kaya. They have been held for the past four months and are facing possible life sentences on charges of “membership of a terrorist organization” and “endangering the integrity of the state.”The very small courtroom chosen for the trial will not be able to accommodate the many observers, some of whom have come a long way to show their support for the journalists.Erdoğan is known both for award-winning novels that have been translated into many languages and her human rights advocacy. She has been defending peace, women’s rights and the rights of minorities for years. Her books and columns have drawn attention to rights violations, prison conditions and the violence to which the civilian population in the mainly Kurdish southeast is exposed.Although she suffers from asthma and diabetes, she was placed in solitary confinement when initially taken into custody. RSF reiterates its call for as many signatures as possible to the petition for the release of Erdoğan and her colleagues, which is available here.Five journalists in custody for the past four daysThe five journalists who have been held since 25 December were all arrested in dawn raids on their homes and are all charged with “propaganda for a terrorist organization.”They are Tunca Öğreten, an investigative journalist and former editor of the news website Diken; DİHA news agency reporters Ömer Çelik and Metin Yoksu; ETHA news agency reporter Derya Okatan; and Eray Sargın, the editor of the news website Yolculuk.Both DİHA and ETHA are among the many media outlets that have been closed by decree in recent months.The main point in common among these journalists is that they reported revelations by a group of far-left hackers about energy minister Berat Albayrak, who is President Erdoğan’s son-in-law. RedHack announced in late September that it had hacked into his email accounts and published their contents. But its revelations were drastically censored.Already ranked as low as 151st out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2016 World Press Freedom Index, Turkey has seen an unprecedented crackdown since the abortive coup attempt in July.The government is using the state of emergency to silence all of its critics and has closed many media outlets. The authorities have withdrawn press cards and passports from many journalists, and more than 100 journalists are currently in prison. News Human rights groups warns European leaders before Turkey summit April 2, 2021 Find out more April 2, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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