ebwufoxu

Charlotte ferry resumes service, no longer free

By on January 1, 2021

first_imgThe Lake Champlain Transportation Company (LCT) today resumed ferry service at the Essex-Charlotte crossing.  The ferry will operate Monday through Friday until April 5, at which point service will be expanded to seven days per week.  The ferry begins service from Vermont at 7 a.m. and from New York at 7:30 am each day.  As has been the standard practice, the LCT charges for use of their privately-owned ferry. Their current rates start at $9.50 per vehicle for a one-way trip.For more detailed schedule and rate information, visit the Lake Champlain Transportation Company web site at  http://www.ferries.com/temporary_schedule.asp(link is external) .  Year-round temporary ferry service will continue to operate 24 hours a day, free of charge to travelers between Crown Point, NY, and Chimney Point, VT during the time it takes for a new Lake Champlain Bridge to be built and to open.As always, please visit the website https://www.nysdot.gov/lakechamplainbridge(link is external) or www.ferries.com(link is external) ( http://www.ferries.com/(link is external) )for the most current information.Source: VTrans. 3.23.2010last_img read more

Continue Reading

ebwufoxu

Contactless payments at a tipping point?

By on December 17, 2020

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr A pandemic of global proportions may be pushing contactless card adoption to new heights, and soon.The Futurist Groupthink firm has just issued a report on survey findings that the coronavirus outbreak had sharply increased U.S. consumers’ perceived importance of contactless payments.And that was as of March 3, the report notes, the same day the World Health Organization advised consumers to quit using cashbecause of the ability of paper to carry the deadly virus.The Futurist Group’s survey of 3,187 structured product reviews on the perceived importance of contactless functionality in evaluating a credit card offer found that 38% of consumers considered it “table stakes”, a 26.6% jump from before the virus hit. continue reading »last_img read more

Continue Reading

ebwufoxu

2006 SUMMIT COVERAGE: Business leaders urged to plan for severe flu pandemic

By on November 18, 2020

first_img “All of us now depend on imported products, and all of that depends on the free movement of people and goods across national borders,” Cooper said. Travel now accounts for 10% of the world’s gross economic activity and 8% of jobs, she added. Parallels between 1918 virus and H5N1Osterholm sought to background the audience on the science of pandemics in an hour-long talk he called “Influenza 101.” A major theme was that recent research has uncovered chilling similarities between the H5N1 avian influenza virus now circulating in Asia and the H1N1 flu virus that took the world by storm in 1918. In a question period later, Falvey was asked how aware the business world is about the pandemic threat. “I don’t think everyone is getting it, but companies that provide pandemic-related products and services are,” she said. “There’s lots of movement at the highest levels in America to plan for this.” About 300 people, mostly business officials, are attending the 2-day meeting, called Business Planning for Pandemic Influenza: A National Summit, at the Minneapolis Convention Center. The meeting is sponsored by CIDRAP and the US and Minnesota Chambers of Commerce. Among the “immediate losers” in a pandemic would be tourism, transportation, the hospitality industry, life and health insurers, and the entertainment industry, Cooper said. Major economic impact predictedEconomic strategist Dr. Sherry Cooper painted a gloomy picture of the potential economic effects of a pandemic on today’s densely interwoven world. “I think it comes down to the concepts in the law of foreseeability and reasonable response to foreseeable risks,” she concluded. She advised businesses to expect absenteeism rates of about 30% at the peak of a pandemic, along with “months of slowdown.” Researchers recently have concluded that the 1918 virus jumped directly from birds to humans, which bears comparison with the way the H5N1 avian virus is infecting some humans, though it has not spread from person to person. Further, certain mutations seen in the 1918 virus have also been found in H5N1 viruses, Osterholm said. The good news in all this gloom is that “98% of the population will survive,” Cooper said. “It’s not the end of the world.” Leavitt sounded themes that he has used repeatedly in state meetings on pandemic preparedness around the country, warning that every business, government agency, community, school, organization, and household should develop and test a pandemic preparedness plan. She said the pandemic threat poses a dilemma for preparedness advocates in business. “Pre-pandemic we can sound alarmist, yet post-pandemic we can look as if we didn’t do enough,” she said. The foreseeable consequences of a pandemic, she said, include economic losses, supply-chain disruptions, employee absenteeism, quarantines and travel restrictions, an increase in demand for health care, and a decline in tourism. The flu drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu) also has its limitations, he said. “The way we use Tamiflu now may not work for H5N1—it’s likely to be needed at a much higher dosage for a much longer time period.” Utility service could be disrupted. “Imagine no waste management, no clean water, no electricity—not just for a couple of days, but perhaps for weeks,” she said. Fuel shortages, consumer hoarding of things like bottled water, shortages of medical supplies, and other difficulties would make matters worse. Most juries in liability suits understand that accidents happen and human errors occur, Falvey said. “What juries don’t forgive is a failure to assess, a failure to act, to commit money and resources to deal with a problem,” and to involve top management in that effort, she said. For example, Falvey said she represented a refinery operator in Belize that worked for years to prevent an explosion. The company had a computerized alarm system, and officials worked with neighborhood groups and local doctors to prepare them to respond. When the company landed in court, Falvey reported, “What happened was that the jurors respected the process of planning and due diligence. . . . They didn’t penalize the company for a failed alarm system, because there was a documented record of monthly tests. That kind of evidence of planning and proactive efforts at mitigation and relief helps limit your liability.” Cooper, executive vice president of BMO Financial Group in Toronto, said the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) outbreak in Toronto hinted at the possible impact of a pandemic. The virus infected only 252 people and caused 44 deaths in the city, but that was enough to trigger the quarantine of 15,000 people. Hospitals filled up and had to stop all nonessential services, while the World Health Organization warned against traveling to Toronto, causing tourism to collapse. She also advised the audience to educate their employees on pandemic-related risks and on company policies. “Planning will lead to a much calmer environment,” she concluded. “Let’s hope these plans won’t be put to use any time soon.” “Jurors want to know that there was an adequate planning process and that all possibilities were considered, and they were balanced,” she said. Careful risk assessment urged Attorney Cheryl Falvey advised business leaders to carefully assess the risks a flu pandemic would pose and then take documented steps to limit them. Falvey is a partner with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer and Field LLP in Washington, DC. Feb 14, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Speakers at a national conference in Minneapolis today sought to impress business leaders with the potentially disastrous effects of an influenza pandemic without scaring them into thinking that preparing for one is futile. “We can’t hope our way out of this, and we can’t just sit and say, ‘Woe is me.’ Comprehensive and serious planning is not optional,” said Michael T. Osterholm, PhD, MPH, director of the University of Minnesota Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, publisher of the CIDRAP Web site. Falvey invited business people to imagine what kind of lawsuit they could face in the aftermath of a pandemic. Cooper spoke of the “blurring” of national economic boundaries in a world of multinational corporations, global travel, and international supply chains focused on “just-in-time” delivery of parts and products. In opening the session, US Health and Human Services Secretary Michael Leavitt said the Hurricane Katrina disaster taught the lesson that “the unthinkable happens, and we need to be thinking about the unthinkable.” He warned that modern medicine won’t offer a great deal of protection in the first several months of a pandemic flu, if ever. Given the time it takes to develop and produce a vaccine for a new flu strain, “Don’t count on a vaccine to get us out of this, at least in the first stage,” he said. In such a world, a severe pandemic would mean a sharp economic downturn, Cooper said. “It is our rough estimate that . . . the global economy would lose roughly six percentage points worth of growth in a 3-month period. It would mean the economy would decline at a 2% annual rate.” The US economy would take a $670 billion hit, she estimated. He recounted watching figure skater Sarah Hughes turn in the performance of her life in the 2002 Winter Olympic games in Salt Lake City, when he was governor of Utah, and said that the pandemic threat should elicit a comparable preparedness effort. “We as a public health community and as a business community need to skate the performance of our lives,” he said. The meeting brought predictions that a major pandemic would put the world economy into reverse and could kill more people than the pandemic of 1918, in which an estimated 50 million to 100 million died. But speakers also said that even in such a disaster, 98% of people would survive, and preparation for “foreseeable risks” will help businesses weather the storm with less damage and legal liability. Despite the precautions, the feared explosion finally occurred—and the computerized alarm system failed in the event, she said. “You need to develop a record to show that management has met its obligations to its various constituencies,” such as customers, employees, shareholders, subsidiaries, and the community, she said. Echoing a point made by Cooper, Falvey urged businesses to make sure they have sick leave and medical policies that don’t discourage workers from staying home when sick. “I can’t come to any other conclusion than that H5N1 and the 1918 H1N1 [viruses] are kissing cousins of the highest order,” he said. Osterholm was asked if he would advise people to stockpile oseltamivir. In reply, he admitted that he has stockpiled some himself, as have colleagues who have been known to counsel the opposite. But he also said it’s essential to make sure there are adequate supplies of antivirals and other medical products for healthcare workers and first responders.last_img read more

Continue Reading

ebwufoxu

Inner City

By on October 20, 2020

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Continue Reading

ebwufoxu

90 second pitch lands $90,000 for Gen Y property developer

By on October 6, 2020

first_imgJack Gould, 24, is looking at profit of $490,000 on his current developments. Picture: Jono Searle.“At the moment I am doing $5.98m worth of developments in Brisbane with an projected profit share of $1.02m. From this I will be earning a projected $490,000 and I also have two investment properties and live in a waterfront penthouse,” he said. “I do this fulltime now and I am doing all of this with none of my own money. I also just finished writing a book about how I overcame drug addiction to run my own successful business.”Ms Cooper said they were in a privileged position.“It’s pretty good,” she said. “Not many 20-year-olds can say that. It’s an amazing vehicle to get you where you want to be.”She now plans to take three months off to work in a summer camp in the US.“It’s something I’ve always wanted to do,” she said, “then come back and look at my next property.”Her advice to other millennials was to ignore the naysayers: “Don’t let all the negative comments get to you … Just educate yourself. Money is easy to get. Learn from people who have done it. Don’t listen to people who haven’t done it.” More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home5 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor5 hours agoNaomi Cooper on site in Shailer Park – her first development project. Picture: Jono Searle.“The biggest eye-opener is just how accessible property is,” she said. “There are so many people complaining about how hard it is to get into the property market but the issue isn’t their age or money, the issue is their knowledge and education.”She said the program showed her how it was possible to use other people’s money and work around common ways people get into property. “I go to someone who has a lot of money and say you have money but don’t have time, invest and I’ll give a 20 per cent return and split the profit 50-50.”Mr Gould, who’s writing a book about his experiences and speaks at school assemblies about property, said his goal was to earn $1m next financial year. Naomi Cooper, who’s looking at profit of $90,000 on her first renovation project, and Jack Gould, 24, who’s looking at profit of $490,000 on his current developments. Picture: Jono Searle.A 90-SECOND pitch will land a 20-year-old developer $90,000 today, part of a program that’s changing Gen Y lives by making them property moguls.Naomi Cooper, 20, and Jack Gould, 24, were part of a 26-week intensive program called The Property Games, which teaches Gen Y participants how to succeed in property development and helps them tee up with investors to do so.Ms Cooper will today accept a profit cut of over $90,000 for a Shailer Park development, while Mr Gould has several Brisbane properties under construction where his profit will be $490,000.Property Games co-founder and chief executive of the Future Housing Taskforce Kevin Doodney said the program started after a debate over why millennials were not getting into property development – which he argued was matter of education.“I said you can select any kid from Australia from 18 to 22 and we could teach them to be good developers for rest of their lives, the only thing that separates them is ability and confidence. If we can teach them all those things in 26 weeks, they can be successful in property.”Seven were selected off 90-second video pitches made to judges – from Geelong to Sunshine Coast, Tasmania and Charters Towers.“We knew nothing (about them) other than their pitches,” Mr Doodney said. “Last year one was a junkie, and he’s completely reformed now. They had no money and no jobs at the time.”.Ms Cooper subdivided and developed a Hester Street property in Shailer Park, where her joint venture partner put up the initial property at about $550,000, with a deal to split the profits 50-50. Some of her biggest costs were over $33,000 for concreting, renovation of over $28,000, over $16,000 in earthworks, over $16,000 for council works, close to $16,000 in bank interest, and over $10,000 in engineering.last_img read more

Continue Reading

ebwufoxu

One of Palm Beach’s best beach houses sells for a mega price

By on

first_img73 Third Ave, Palm Beach.A CLASSIC beach house within arms reach of the beach has changed hands for $1.092 million last week.The stunning Palm Beach property at 73 Third Ave exudes a quintiessetial beach house style and comes with oak timber flooring, soaring ceilings and a resort style swimming pool.The pool is simply stunning.David Lonie and Mishy Canning from LJ Hooker Palm Beach negotiated the sale and described it as ‘the perfect investment opportunity’.The four-bedroom home was transformed in 12 weeks by its previous homeowners Ginny and Ben Burgess in 2014.Nailing the dream bathroom look.Architecturally redesigned by Garnett Gary J & Associates, the home is described by the couple as a modern interpretation of a classic beach house.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North5 hours ago02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa1 day agoThe couple, who have combined their experience in development and design, said they wanted to create the perfect beach house.The couple transformed the old home at 73 Third Ave into an amazing beach house.“We moved from Dubai in 2013 after spending five years living there,” Mrs Burgess said.“We always wanted to end up on the Gold Coast. My husband Ben is a developer and he has always had an obsession with Palm Beach.”Family living made easy.Mrs Burgess said the couple battled it out at auctions until they secured the right home.“We were outbid three times and we were getting a bit frustrated but then we found this place,” she said.“It needed some fixing up and it would have been cheaper to rebuild but we admired the home’s aesthetics and the architecture.Sleek, stylish and welcoming.“Our family are big lovers of the ocean and the beach and we wanted a lifestyle where we could take a dip in the ocean every morning.”The couple said the 12-week transformation involved peeling the home back to a skeleton and taking out two main walls.last_img read more

Continue Reading

ebwufoxu

IADC: New Terra et Aqua Available

By on September 28, 2020

first_imgThe International Association of Dredging Companies (IADC) has just published the latest edition of their Terra et Aqua magazine.The new Terra et Aqua shines a spotlight on the dredging industry through three new articles about Manoeuvring in Mud, a Status Quo Challenger and Workability Tool.“How navigable are fluid mud layers? Authors and researchers from TU Delft give an overview of the research that has been conducted to get a better understanding of the navigation in ports and waterways with fluid mud layers,” IADC stated.In the latest publication, IADC speaks with Tiedo Vellinga – Professor Emeritus of Ports & Waterways at TU Delft – about the much-needed shift in the way of thinking about designing infrastructure.Through dynamic co-operations with parties involved in dredging, IADC organizes international conferences and dredging-related events. IADC and CEDA are co-hosting an interdisciplinary conference to launch the publication Dredging for Sustainable Infrastructure.last_img read more

Continue Reading

ebwufoxu

Extra Funding Boost for Bowen Seawall

By on

first_imgThe Palaszczuk Government has committed to a full rebuild of the Bowen Front Beach Seawall, with a further $895,000 allocated to upgrade a remaining 45-meter section of the 165-meter structure.Queensland Premier, Annastacia Palaszczuk, said that the funding would be provided to Whitsunday Regional Council to make sure the entire seawall is built to a higher and more resilient standard.“As a result of Severe Tropical Cyclone Debbie in March 2017, significant sections of the Bowen Front Beach Seawall were damaged,” the Premier said.“A 120-meter section of the wall had already been approved to be rebuilt through the joint state and Commonwealth Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements (NDRRA), as part of the Category D Environmental Recovery Package, however, the remaining 45-meters of the wall was not eligible for NDRRA funding under the Commonwealth’s terms and conditions, as it was not damaged by Cyclone Debbie.“To ensure a consistent and stronger seawall rebuild, my government is pleased to provide the additional funding to upgrade this remaining section.”Minister for State Development, Manufacturing, Infrastructure and Planning, Cameron Dick, said the additional funding would see the seawall rebuilt with an improved design to increase resilience to severe weather events.“The seawall will be raised by half a meter, with the improved design and construction set to better protect council’s built assets and minimize the potential for loss,” Mr Dick said.The seawall, which aids in the protection of the parkland at Front Beach and adjacent road Santa Barbara Parade, extends from Bowen Water Park towards the Bowen Marina rock wall and Starboard Drive.last_img read more

Continue Reading

ebwufoxu

Batesville 3rd Grade Boys Win HBCA Southeastern Indiana Regional Championship

By on September 24, 2020

first_imgThe Bulldogs 3rd Grade Boys defeated the Milan Indians Twice on Saturday at Milan Elementary to win the HBCA Southeastern Indiana Regional Title38-26.With Batesville and Milan being the only two 3rd grade teams in this year’s regional, the teams played a best of 3 format.  In game 1 the Bulldogs Jumped out early and held on to defeat the young Indians 38-26.  The Bulldogs were led in scoring by Cayden Drake with 16, Lincoln Garrett 10, William Kuisel 8 and Caleb Mohr 4.In the deciding game two on the day, the Indians scored the game’s first basket, but it was all Bulldogs after that closing the door on the Indians 37-28.  Drake led with 22 points, followed by Mohr with 7, Ethan Schneider 4, Trenton Jordan and Garrett 2.The 3rd graders move to (16-1) on the season and qualify for the HBCA State Tournament in Salem April 1st and 2nd.Courtesy of Bulldogs Coach Paul Drake.last_img read more

Continue Reading