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Peace conference to kick off

By on January 26, 2021

first_imgThe student-run conference kicks off Friday evening with keynote speaker John Prendergast, founder of the Enough Project, which is a project to end genocide and crimes against humanity.   “When you go to Notre Dame, it isn’t just about the classes you take or the books you have to read, it’s also about what you choose to do with your education,” Scribner said. “And I believe this conference really gets students to think about that.”  The conference will also feature several panels, including one on careers in peace building and an information fair to show how students can get involved with various peace efforts around the world. “It’s really about putting a tangible grasp on what it means to be a peacebuilder and promote peace worldwide,” Alex Hellmuth, senior and conference co-chair, said. “We want to show how it’s possible to work for peace in all different areas.” Nearly 300 students from across the world will meet on campus this weekend to discuss practical methods of peace building at the 18th annual Student Peace Conference, sponsored by the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies.  This year’s conference — to be held in the Hesburgh Center for International Studies — is entitled “Invest in Peace: Uncovering the Practicality of Peacebuilding.” “He is a very engaging and interactive speaker, so it will definitely be interesting,” she said.   Scribner said Prendergast will discuss his experience in Africa and the role of conflict minerals in the Congo in his address. “We’re really excited that he was able to come,” said Kelsey Scribner, co-chair along with Hellmuth. “He has a lot of experience with peacebuilding in Africa and was even an advisor for the Clinton administration.”  She said “Invest in Peace” focuses on making practical solutions and demonstrating what works in policy implementation and development.   “Our goal was to develop a theme that was more inclusive,” Hellmuth said.  “Ultimately, we are trying to reach out to more people and make the conference more interdisciplinary.”  Both Peace Studies majors, Hellmuth and Scribner said the conference is an important thing for the University to host because it encourages students to engage in social justice and highlights elements of Catholic Social Teaching. Although meal registration closed on March 23, anyone interested in attending any of the other conference events is still able to do so.last_img read more

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SMC, ND release statements on death

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first_imgBoth Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s released statements Sunday in reaction to a Chicago Tribune story about the circumstances surrounding the Sept. 10 death of first year Saint Mary’s student Elizabeth “Lizzy” Seeberg. The Chicago Tribune reported in Sunday story that Seeberg told Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) she was sexually attacked by a Notre Dame football player Aug. 31. Originally from Northbrook, Ill., Seeberg died at Memorial Hospital in South Bend on Sept. 10. She was 19 years old and a resident of McCandless Hall. In a Sunday statement, Saint Mary’s director of media relations Gwen O’Brien directly referenced the Chicago Tribune story and said the College would not comment on the circumstances surrounding Seeberg’s death. “Saint Mary’s College does not comment on matters that may infringe on the privacy of our current or former students,” O’Brien said. “We are also respecting the privacy of the Seeberg family.” The statement listed a number of educational and support services provided to all Saint Mary’s students regarding sexual assault, including sessions during the first two weeks of school for first year students. “At Saint Mary’s College, the safety, security and well-being of our students are our top priorities,” O’Brien said. “We take our responsibility to guide them through their four years at Saint Mary’s very seriously. As an all-women’s college, Saint Mary’s provides our young women with a variety of programs, many of which are required, to prepare them for life in the world today.” Notre Dame spokesman Dennis Brown said Sunday the University takes all reports of broken laws and University policy seriously. “Notre Dame will never be silent or passive when it comes to the careful, thorough and fair determination of whether or not laws or university policies have been broken on our campus,” Brown said. “This is an important obligation and one that we take very seriously.” Brown said the University does not release information about specific cases involving students. “We have a longstanding, effective and consistent process in place that gathers information, eliminates rumors and makes informed, fact-based determinations, all while adhering to university policies and the federal student privacy laws that restrict us from discussing specific disciplinary cases,” Brown said. NDSP is a fully authorized police force and works closely with other local law enforcement, Brown said. The University forwards all investigations of sexual assault to the St. Joseph County Prosecutor’s Office. According to ESPN Chicago, Notre Dame head football coach Brian Kelly said during a Sunday conference call with reporters that the issue is a “University matter.” “I’m not going to get into the specifics,” Kelly said. “From my standpoint, as the head football coach, I think it was made clear that the University is going to deal with any matters of this nature. And that for me, one of the reasons why I came to Notre Dame is I have the same standards that our University does. We are in lockstep relative to the standards that we hold here at the University of Notre Dame.” In a Sunday e-mail to the Saint Mary’s student body, College President Carol Ann Mooney said the “outpouring of support and concern” in response to the Chicago Tribune story reflected Saint Mary’s sense of community. “The outpouring of support and concern by our students, faculty, and staff reinforces what we all know is special about Saint Mary’s, our unique sense of community inspired by our Holy Cross heritage,” she stated. “I realize this story will reawaken painful memories.” The e-mail also listed support services for students, including the Women’s Health Center, Campus Ministry, Belles Against Violence Office, Residence Life and Community Standards and Campus Security.last_img read more

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Dance Marathon sets record charity goal

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first_imgWith 12 hours of dancing, crafts, activities and performers, Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon has teamed up with Notre Dame in the hopes of raising more than last year’s total of over $77,000 for the Riley Hospital for Children.  Meaghan Curliss, senior and vice president of Dance Marathon, said organizers of the event set high expectations. “Our goal is always to beat the year before,” she said. This year’s Dance Marathon will begin March 5 at noon and end at midnight. Senior Colleen Trausch, dancer relations and recruitment chair, said the group is on its way to matching last year’s total with 100 dancers signed up from Saint Mary’s alone. She said they do not know the number of Notre Dame participants yet. Curliss said the committee hopes to increase the number of dancers. “We want more participants — people who will stick with the cause,” she said. Children from the Riley Hospital for Children and their families will be attending the event. “Participants will really have a chance to see a tangible effect on the children whose lives they are helping,” Curliss said. The night will also include crafts, activities, inflatables and food for the dancers. Local bands will perform, and there will be a DJ for the entire event. Chipotle, Papa Vino’s, Red Robin, Hot Box and Subway will be available. Curliss said she appreciates the participants coming out for a good cause.  “I’m really excited,” Curliss said. “I really hope everyone can come out. It’s a great event to see how much this can impact and really change lives.” Those who are not registered are still invited to come. “It’s a really rewarding event,” Trausch said. To register for the event, students are asked for a $15 donation, which can be done today and Feb. 28 to March 4 in the Student Center Atrium during lunch and dinner hours. Notre Dame students can register online by searching Riley Children Foundation at www.nd.edu. Donations can be made through Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon’s website, www.smcdancemarathon.orglast_img read more

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Professor emeritus dies at 79

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first_imgNai-Chien Huang, professor emeritus of aerospace and mechanical engineering at the University of Notre Dame, died Sunday at his home in Los Altos, Calif., after a long illness. He was 79 years old. Huang joined Notre Dame’s faculty in 1983, according to a University press release. Prior to joining Notre Dame’s staff, he served on the faculties of the University of California at San Diego, Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin. He retired in 2001. A native of Nantong, China, Huang studied engineering at the National Taiwan University in Taipei, graduating in 1953. He earned his master’s degree from Brown University in 1958 and his doctoral degree from Harvard in 1963. In a written tribute, Joseph Powers, professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering, said his colleague epitomized the term of “a gentleman and a scholar.” “He was a great teacher, always impeccable in his presentation and with a conspicuous reverence for knowledge. He loved Notre Dame, its students and faculty, and he was a great role model … including for me.” Huang is survived by his wife of 49 years, Geraldine, and their two children, Sheila and Nathan.last_img read more

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Au Bon Pain to open in library

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first_imgHungry students will no longer make a “LaFun run” to refuel during late-night study marathons in the Hesburgh Library now that Au Bon Pain will open on the library’s first floor in November.   The café will supplant the vending machines in the first floor lounge, which have been relocated to the basement lobby. Associate Director of Retail and Food Services Administration Mark King said the addition of Au Bon Pain will satisfy the cravings of a large portion of the Notre Dame community. “Au Bon Pain is a bakery, fresh sandwiches, soups and salads place very similar to Panera Bread,” King said. “Au Bon Pain actually created Panera Bread … a lot of people on campus want Panera Bread but we aren’t a big enough market to warrant a Panera Bread – this way we are able to satisfy that group of people without duplicating anything we already had on campus.” The continual product development and variety at Au Bon Pain will add to the café’s appeal, King said.   “They have a coffee/barista station, a plain coffee station, a smoothie section, sandwich section, premade sandwiches and salads, breakfasts and oatmeal served in the morning, and different soups that are appealing and different,” King said. “The menu will change periodically as well, with seasonal salads and soups and fresh baked goods.” Michael Davy, Food Services administration continuous improvement manager and future manager of the library’s Au Bon Pain, said he suspects the café will receive a lot of foot traffic. “I think people will come and try what’s offered at the café because people want to experience something a little different,” Davy said. “We’ll hit traditional meal periods, and outside of traditional meal periods students that use the library will be able to stop by and get a sandwich, use our full espresso coffee or smoothie programs or get a late night snack.” Hesburgh Library Facilities Manager Ross Ferguson said a joint team of Food Services staff and Hesburgh Library staff concluded Au Bon Pain was the best option for the library. “A committee of five of us met with Food Services to discuss Au Bon Pain and other local and national options,” Ferguson said.  “Au Bon Pain we could get going by November, but the other options would push us back to 2013.” Davy said Food Services looked for a restaurant that would compliment the other eateries on campus, fit in the available physical space and satisfy consumers. “A few factors in the decision were the quality of the menu’s offerings, the corporate franchise support and uniqueness of the new café – there’s not one in the immediate area,” Davy said. “Primarily though, the biggest thing was the quality of the food.” The focus at Au Bon Pain is on producing fresh food, Davy said. “One of the interesting quality principles of Au Bon Pain Corporation is that any prepackaged item that’s made for sale in a to-go container is made for sale that day, on that day,” Davy said. “You can get made-to-order things, but nothing is held over to the next day… that speaks to the quality principles of the franchise.” The café will even make nutritional information readily accessible, Davy said. “We will have a nutritional kiosk where any customer can use a touch screen to find out the nutritional components of any of the menu items in the store,” hy said. King said Au Bon Pain’s structure will work well with the café’s planned schedule. “Au Bon Pain’s concept has the ability to expand and contract based on the [consumer] volume, which is very convenient,” King said.  “This enables the café to act as an accordion: there are going to be busy times and slow times, especially because we’re looking at being open for a very long time([7 a.m. to 1 a.m ]. At the times with less traffic fresh sandwiches probably won’t be offered.” Ferguson said he did some personal research to test how well-suited the first floor of the library would be for Au Bon Pain. “We wanted to see how many people were walking by that location in order to show that this was a viable place for the café,” Ferguson said.  “I watched the number of people passing one mornin, and counted 72 people coming in from the parking lot, most of them with coffee in their hands.” Many student concerns revolved around the accessibility of the future café, Ferguson said. “We feel that a large percentage of the students want places open, that they feel there are not enough places open on campus [that late]… the café going in, courtyard being finished and fishbowl renovation all go into the big picture plan,” Ferguson said. The affordable price point Au Bon Pain offers made it an attractive choice, Ferguson said. It doesn’t make sense to bring in a big fancy place that [students] can’t afford,” Ferguson said.  “DomersDollars, fresh food, healthy choices: that’s what the students asked for.” Senior Tyler Bartlow said he thinks students will appreciate the café’s accessibility.   “It will be great to have a food option within the library when I’m studying,” Bartlow said. Senior Ashlee Hunt said she is looking forward to the addition of an eatery to the library. “I don’t know what it is but I’m excited for food to be in the library, especially relatively inexpensive, healthy food,” Hunt said. King said the café will open in November. “We’re shooting for a November 12 opening date, but that’s contingent on construction getting done,” King said.   It will be interesting to open it up during a football week, but that will help us give it a big kick-off.”last_img read more

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Panelists dispute nature of conflict, potential solutions

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first_imgThree preeminent Notre Dame faculty members debated the relative merits and consequences of American military and political intervention in Syria on Tuesday. David Cortright, director of policy studies at the Kroc Institute for Peace Studies, moderated the panel discussion. Although a proposition by Russia earlier Tuesday all but mooted the question of imminent military intervention, the panel still engaged in a lively discussion of the United States’ options with regard to Syria. Asher Kaufman, Mary Ellen O’Connell and Michael Desch presented three distinct views about how the United States should approach the recent developments in the Middle Eastern nation.  Kaufman, associate professor of history and peace studies, said the situation in Syria involves not only internal turmoil, but also conflict with neighboring states.  “This conflict is beyond one circumscribed within the boundaries of Syria,” Kaufman said. “It has become a regional issue, and this is how it needs to be understood.” Kaufman named several contributors to the regional nature of the Syrian conflict, including an influx of thousands of Islamists from neighboring countries and upheaval resulting from the internally displaced people and from the millions of refugees spreading beyond Syria’s borders.  “The numbers are disturbing, mind-boggling – over two million refugees outside of the boundaries of Syria are in neighboring countries,” Kaufman said. “The hosting countries need to provide them with basic needs – jobs, roofs over their heads – and in countries such as Lebanon, with an estimated 500,000 Syrian refugees and a native population of only four million, you can imagine the pressure on Lebanese resources to try and support these Syrian refugees.”  In contrast to Kaufman’s illustration of the regional conflict, O’Connell, a research professor of international dispute resolution and professor of law, focused on the need to uphold the integrity of international law in approaching a resolution for the Syrian conflict.  “The heart of the matter of this moment is the international legal norm against the use of chemical weapons,” O’Connell said. “It is binding on Syria: Syria is a full sovereign party to the Geneva gas protocol of 1925.” Although she acknowledged Syria to be in clear violation of international norms against chemical weapons, O’Connell stressed the importance of legitimizing further intervention in Syria by acting in strict accordance with the United Nations Charter.  “If we start saying legitimacy is something other than what is commensurate with international legality, we are weakening the very system of norms that have banned the use of military force,” she said. “These principles, developed and reported on by a high-level [United Nations] panel, were brought together in the 2005 World Summit Outcome Document – to which the United States and every other member of the UN agreed – and it said that the Charter is sufficient to address the full range of threats to international peace and security.” While Kaufman and O’Connell discussed political frameworks for approaching the conflict in Syria, Desch, a professor of political science, evaluated possible military tactics the United States could employ in Syria and the political feasibility and consequences of these scenarios.  “Despite the relatively formidable Syrian military, the United States has lots of conceivable military options,” Desch said. “From a purely objective military standpoint, military operations in Syria would be a cakewalk. We can do basically anything we want to do.”  Despite a plethora of available tactics, ranging from ground interventions to airstrikes, Desch said the solution to the Syrian problem would have to remain largely political in nature. “The limiting factor in the administration’s decision calculus is not so much the military factor, but rather, the political factor,” he said. “Would any use of military force actually advance [American] political interest? My Clausewitzian assessment is that none of our military options will achieve any political objectives that we have.”last_img read more

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Grad student wins award

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first_imgAbigail Weaver, a chemistry graduate student at Notre Dame, received the 2014 Baxter Young Investigator Award for her work aimed at analyzing and identifying counterfeit drugs. Her winning research project was titled, “New Analytical Tools for Qualitative Pharmaceutical Analysis in Field Settings.”Weaver completed her undergraduate education at Anderson University and earned her master’s degree at Purdue University. She is currently in her fifth year as a graduate student at Notre Dame.“The aim of the Baxter Young Investigator Award is to reward research in the development of therapies and medical products,” Weaver said.The prestigious award is awarded by Baxter International Inc., a global healthcare company headquartered in Deerfield, Illinois. It is open to graduate and post-doctoral students in the Midwest and includes four different scientific categories, such as life sciences, medical device engineering and pharmaceutical sciences. Weaver won the prize in the company’s instrumental and analytical science division.The introduction of Weaver’s research project states statistical information regarding the pharmaceutical supply chain’s modern complexity. According to Weaver, the U.S. imports 40 percent of finished medications, as well as 80 percent of active ingredients.Weaver said her project was aimed at overcoming the problem imposed by the counterfeit pharmaceutical industry. She helped develop a chromatography paper that tests the contents of any pharmaceutical drug swiped across it.“The problem is poor quality drugs,” Weaver said. “The test card makes a profile and screens the pharmaceuticals, so that you can see if there’s a variation in the active ingredients.“You get a color bar code of the pharmaceutical that can be compared with the pattern of colors the authentic drug gives. We can identify differences between the two drugs based on the color bar code.”Weaver said the guidance of Marya Lieberman, Notre Dame associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry and the efforts of undergraduate students, helped make this project possible.“Marya Lieberman had started the project and was working with undergraduates,” Weaver said. “I’ve been working with her for four-and-a-half years.”Weaver said her paper-based test minimizes the gap between the scientist’s lab and the real world by acting as an inexpensive way to check for quality pharmaceuticals. Additionally, she has already completed some work with the FDA and has used the test in several developing countries, such as Haiti and Kenya.“I had done a little bit of research already with Lieberman,” Weaver said. “We were working with the Haiti program to find a low-tech method for quantifying medication in salt for lymphatic filariasis. That work was taken down to Haiti and was implemented in a salt plant [there].”Despite her extensive research and accomplishments, Weaver said she is not finished yet. She continues to work towards promoting scientific technologies that aim to improve the standard of living in developing countries.“I would like to see organizations using this test to screen pharmaceuticals,” Weaver said. “I would also like to see it inspire other people to develop technologies that work in developing countries.”Tags: 2014 baxter young investigator award, abigail weaver, chemistry graduate studentlast_img read more

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Two rapes reported

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first_imgTwo rapes were reported to campus administrators Tuesday according to Wednesday’s Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) crime log.One of the alleged rapes occurred Friday in a “East side women’s residence hall”; the other allegedly occurred Sept. 24 in a “Northwest men’s residence hall.”As of press time, students have not received an email alert from NDSP regarding either report. An email seeking comment from University spokesperson Dennis Brown seeking clarification as to why students had not received an email notification had not been returned. The Clery Act requires universities to issue “timely warnings” if certain crimes are brought to their attention, including all legally defined sex offenses. However, the Clery Act does not define “timely.”Information about sexual assault prevention and resources for survivors of sexual assault are available online from NDSP and from the Committee for Sexual Assault Prevention (CSAP).Tags: NDSP, rapelast_img read more

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SMC students discuss potential ACTF plays

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first_imgTags: American College Theater Festival, Thespians Unplugged Saint Mary’s will submit two performances to the American College Theater Festival in hopes of having them selected and performed at the event in January. The American College Theater Festival (ACTF) is sponsored by the Kennedy Foundation. According to the festival’s website, ACTF is “a national theater program involving 18,000 students from colleges and universities nationwide.”Thespians Unplugged co-president Stephanie Johnson, a junior, said ACTF is a multi-faceted theater experience. “ACTF is a festival which allows thespians of all natures and backgrounds to grow and explore their talents and interests, offering performance, workshop and technical opportunities for the student and artist,” she said.Thespians Unplugged co-president Makena Henell, a senior, said the College’s theatre program will submit two shows to the festival — “Lucky, Liar, Loser” which premiered in April, and a performance directed by the Tectonic Theater Project which will premiere in November. “We’ve submitted two shows — ‘Lucky, Liar, Loser,’ and we will be submitting the Tectonic Theater Project,” she said. “I would love to see Tectonic accepted into the festival because it’s Saint Mary’s story.”Johnson said she feels the two shows are reflective of the student performer. “Our two shows prospective for the festival are designed for the students in mind, catering to a desire for creating dialogue and harnessing our talents,” she said.Sophomore Elizabeth Ferry said she hopes “Lucky, Liar, Loser,” a show that allowed female characters to share their stories about violence, is selected for the festival. “I feel confident it will be selected,” she said. “It’s a show that provokes a conversation that we all need to have in this day and age, especially in college settings. Bringing it to ACTF will help facilitate a larger conversation.”Sophomore Sandy Tarnowski said she also believes “Lucky, Liar, Loser” has a chance at being selected to perform at the festival.“I definitely think ‘Lucky, Liar, Loser’ has a chance of being performed,” she said. “It is a very relevant piece and something that needs to be talked about and shared, and it is very well put together and understandable.”Ferry said she feels the plays appeal to the theater community and those who consume theater. “ACTF is theater people, so the demographic of people who would come to our show would be more apt to see artsy shows and abstract shows, which is what ‘Lucky, Liar, Loser’ and Tectonic Theater Project are,” she said. “We’re trying to make art and theater accessible to everyone, but the people who attend ACTF might have a deeper appreciation for unconventional or more modern forms of theater.” Ferry said official ACTF judges observe the plays and report their critiques in order to determine which plays will be performed at the festival. “Our directors apply to have their play adjudicated,” she said. “Official adjudicators come in to watch the show and they talk with the cast about it and take notes. At the end of the year, all the adjudicators get together and discuss the shows they want to put on. Five to ten shows from the region are then selected and performed at the festival.”Henell said Saint Mary’s hosts ACTF representatives even when the directors are not submitting their plays to the festival. “We have two ACTF representatives come to all of our shows here at Saint Mary’s,” she said. “Even if we’re not promoting the show or sending it to ACTF, they still come and we get great feedback. Normally, it’s so positive and it’s great to get applauded for our hard work. They usually praise the stage managers and backstage crews so I feel like a lot of unsung heroes then can get their turn in the spotlight.”Ferry said she is eager to see the adjudicators’ results.“It’s secretive the way they choose the plays,” she said. “We don’t know what they’re looking for or if they want certain types of shows.”Henell said if one of the plays is chosen, the cast and crew get to attend the festival for free. All students have the opportunity to attend the festival, however, she said, and there are workshops and theatrical performances sponsored all throughout the week. “There are fun workshops all week,” she said. “There’s ones in stage combat, dance, lighting design and costume design, just to name a few. They also have workshops on how to do your resume for theater or apply for a job or internship in theater. You’re encouraged to take as many as you want. There’s also ten minute scenes to go see and short competitions to watch, as well as a musical theatre intensive.”Tarnowski said she feels having a play selected to perform at the festival will draw more attention to Saint Mary’s.“I feel like having one of our plays performed would bring a lot of attention to Saint Mary’s,” she said. “It might inspire more people to go to Saint Mary’s and do theater here, and it would give a small, all-girls, private college a chance to shine and show people that even though the College does not have a huge, over-funded theatre program, we can still put on a great show.”In December, Ferry said, Saint Mary’s will find out if its plays have been selected for the festival. Having a play chosen by the ACTF would be an esteemed honor, she said. “It would be an amazing experience to get our shows selected because we would get to perform for our peers all across the region,” she said. “It’d be an honor to be chosen.”last_img read more

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Art display aims to bring positivity to campus

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first_imgAs the days get shorter and colder, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures is trying to spread positivity around campus with a new creative art display between DeBartolo and O’Shaughnessy Halls. The exhibit is called “Romance Rocks” and consists of rocks decorated with words written in foreign languages of positivity and encouragement to students, faculty and other passersby. Emma Farnan | The Observer The “Romance Rocks” display, located between DeBartolo and O’Shaughnessy Halls. The display was organized by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and is meant to send a message of positivity to passing pedestrians.Sara Nunley, the undergraduate studies coordinator in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and the person who organized the display, said “Romance Rocks” is meant to combat negativity in the community.“We basically are spreading kindness and encouragement across campus to all students,” Nunley said. “I feel like sometimes things can be so negative that we want positivity and stuff to be spread.”The rocks were created by about 500 students currently enrolled in beginning and intermediate level romance language courses. The rocks include words and phrases written in Italian, French, Spanish and Portuguese. In addition to the positive message, the display is also intended to be a creative way for passing pedestrians to engage with foreign languages.Shauna Williams, the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures’ director of undergraduate studies, helped orchestrate the display. Williams noted the religious aspect of the art. “It lines up really well, as a Catholic University, with our Catholic mission of inclusion and diversity and celebrating differences,” she said.The display is also designed to bring an artistic change of pace to students in language courses, Nunley explained.“I’ve heard a lot from faculty that most students really enjoyed it,” she said. “Just taking a break from their normal routine in class, to just have like a breather you know and just do something fun and creative.”“Romance Rocks” is now beginning its second week on display and is scheduled to be cleared by Friday. Community members and language students will help clean up the display. The display’s first week, Williams explained, was designed to draw attention to the art.“We wanted it on display for two weeks,” she said. “One week so people could just walk by and notice it, especially since this weekend we had a home football game, we had a home hockey game, a home women’s basketball game and a home women’s volleyball game.”During the display’s second week, Nunley said community members are encouraged to pick up the rocks and share them.“This is the week that you’re to take one for yourself or share one with a friend,” she said.  Though Nunley organized and brought the project to Notre Dame, “Romance Rocks” is inspired by the Kindness Rocks Project, founded by Megan Murphy. Murphy is a “Women’s Empowerment Coach, Business Mentor, Kindness Activist, Meditation Instructor and Lecturer,” according to the Project’s website.Williams said the rocks themselves also communicate an important message about the longevity of positive thinking.“What do rocks even symbolize? Its something thats a little, you know, enduring and lasting through centuries,” she said. “They kind of have this other meaning of durability and long-lasting perseverance.”Tags: Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, positivity, Romance Rockslast_img read more

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