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China US trade war could slow world growth to lowest in three

By on July 21, 2019

first_imgChina, U.S. trade war could slow world growth to lowest in three years, OECD warns Growth in trade flows could nearly halve this year Reuters advertisement What you need to know about passing the family cottage to the next generation Join the conversation → 3 Comments Sponsored By: More Featured Stories ← Previous Next → Twitter Comment Email Leigh Thomas Share this storyChina, U.S. trade war could slow world growth to lowest in three years, OECD warns Tumblr Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn Recommended For YouGovernment supporters rally in Hong Kong to seek end to violence’I don’t have words’: Boss of torched Japan animation studio mourns bright, young staffBritain calls ship seizure ‘hostile act’ as Iran releases video of captureBritish Airways suspends flights to Cairo for seven daysThousands in pro-police rally as Hong Kong braces for another mass protest PARIS — Economic growth in China and the United States could be 0.2-0.3 per cent lower on average by 2021 and 2022 if the two countries do not row back on tit-for-tat tariffs in their dispute that has dampened the global economic outlook, the OECD said on Tuesday.U.S. President Donald Trump has raised tariffs on US$200 billion on Chinese imports to 25 per cent from 10 per cent in the long-running trade row, while Beijing said it would hit back by lifting tariffs on US$60 billion in U.S. goods.The global economy would grow by only 3.2 per cent this year as growth in trade flows is nearly halved this year to only 2.1 per cent, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) said in its biannual Economic Outlook.That would be the slowest pace of global economic growth since 2016 and was down marginally from the Paris-based policy forum’s last forecast in March for growth of 3.3 per cent.The world economy should fare slightly better next year with a growth rate of 3.4 per cent, but only if the United States and China pull back from tariff hikes announced this month.The OECD said growth in China and the United States could come in 0.2-0.3 per cent lower on average by 2021 and 2022 if the two nations did not reverse course.Related Stories:China says Trump ‘misleading’ people linking trade deal, slowing economyTrade war rebounds on the United States: KempIMF sees dangers from trade tensions, overvalued dollarWithout taking the latest round of tariff increases into account, the OECD forecast the United States would outpace other big developed economies with growth of 2.8 per cent this year, up from the 2.6 per cent the organization had projected in March.The world’s biggest economy was seen slowing to 2.3 per cent next year even if the new tariff hikes are not carried through.China, which is not an OECD country, has been seeking to stimulate its economy but growth was still seen easing from 6.2 per cent this year to 6.0 per cent in 2020, the lowest rate in 30 years for the world’s second-biggest economy.Global investors are closely watching to see how much more support Beijing will inject to shore up growth after China already loosened monetary policy, cut taxes and allowed local governments to issue special bonds to fund infrastructure projects.Japan’s export-dependent economy is suffering from the drop in trade flows with growth expected at only 0.7 per cent in 2019 and 0.6 per cent in 2020, trimmed from the OECD’s March forecasts of 0.8 per cent and 0.7 per cent respectively.The eurozone is also paying a heavy price for the global trade slowdown, with its growth seen this year at 1.2 per cent before rising to 1.4 per cent year. That was slightly better than the 1.0 per cent and 1.2 per cent expected in March as Italy’s downturn proves slightly less severe than previously expectedMeanwhile, the OECD raised Britain’s growth forecast to 1.2 per cent this year from 0.8 per cent previously, as the prospect of its exit from the European Union was pushed back. UK growth is expected to fall to 1.0 per cent, marginally better than the 0.9 per cent expected in March. © Thomson Reuters 2019 May 21, 20198:10 AM EDT Filed under News Economy Reddit Facebook Growth in trade flows could nearly halve this year to only 2.1 per cent, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) said in its biannual Economic Outlook.Getty Images last_img read more

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Tesla increases price of its new cheapest Model 3 just days after

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first_imgJust days after launching its new cheaper Model 3 with a ‘Mid Range’ battery pack, Tesla has increased the price of the new version of the electric vehicle by $1,000.The automaker also made other price changes in its online design studio. more…The post Tesla increases price of its new cheapest Model 3 just days after launch, reduces price of dual motor appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

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Should You Lease An Electric Car Or Is It Better To Buy

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first_imgSource: Electric Vehicle News LEASING CAN BE A CHEAPER WAY TO GO, BUT IT’S NOT WITHOUT PITFALLS.Leasing, rather than buying a new vehicle outright, has become increasingly popular in recent years. It now accounts for around 30 percent of all transactions and it’s easy to see why. Down payments and monthly outlays are usually lower than with conventional financing, and automakers often offer promotional lease deals with built-in cost reductions that are hard to beat.More EV Basics How The EPA Rates Electric Cars: Range, Efficiency & More Which Are The Cheapest EVs To Own? 10 Ways To Boost Your Electric Car Range While it virtually guarantees you’ll be making perpetual car payments, leasing an electric vehicle for two or three years can help ensure you’ll keep up with the latest technology. You’ll avoid the risk of owning what could be a comparatively obsolete model, or one that’s hampered by a degraded battery that might be difficult to sell five or more years down the road.HOW EV LEASING WORKSLeasing is like an extended car rental in which a consumer pays to use a vehicle for a specific period, which is usually two or three years. Monthly payments are based on the difference between a vehicle’s negotiated transaction price (this is called the “capitalized cost” in the contract) and what the vehicle is expected to be worth when the contract expires (its “residual value”), financed at the going rate of interest (referred to as either a “lease rate,” “lease charge” or “money factor”).In the case of an EV, the leasing company usually claims the $7,500 federal tax credit and applies it directly to the transaction price to reduce a lessee’s monthly payments. This can actually be a better deal than purchasing an EV and having to wait until the following year to claim the credit on your income tax return (and at that you’ll lose some of the credit if you pay less than $7,500 in taxes).Upfront costs typically consist of the first month’s installment and the down payment (called a “capitalized cost reduction”), which can run as much as several thousand dollars. As with financing, making a higher down payment will lower a lessee’s monthly payments, and vice-versa. In addition, lease agreements specify an annual mileage limit that can run anywhere from 10,000-15,000 miles. Settling for a lower mileage threshold will reduce your monthly payments, while receiving a higher limit will raise them.The lessee typically pays for the sales tax, annual vehicle registration fees and taxes, maintenance and insurance, sometimes along with a nominal “acquisition fee,” and other costs.When the lease is up, you can either simply return the vehicle to the dealer, or purchase it at a pre-determined cost. If the car’s residual value ends up being higher than the amount stated in the contract, you could buy the car and resell it at a profit.EXAMPLES OF AUTOMAKERS’ EV LEASE DEALSAs of this writing in late November 2018, Chevrolet is offering a lease deal on the LT version of the Bolt EV with a sticker price of $36,620 for $399 a month for 36 months with $4,479 due at signing and a 10,000 annual mileage limit. (The down payment drops to $3,979 for current lessees of General Motors vehicles.) By comparison, if you finance the Bolt EV for six years at five percent interest with the same down payment, you’ll be making installments of $518, though you will still have some equity in the vehicle when it’s paid off.Meanwhile, Nissan is leasing the Leaf with a hefty cash rebate built into the deal to slash the cost. They’re offering a Leaf that retails for $30,885 at $249 a month for 36 months with $2,929 due at signing and a 10,000 annual mileage limit. With the same money down and a six-year loan at five percent you’d make a $450 monthly payment.If you’re looking to lease a Tesla, on the other hand, you’ll need deeper pockets. The Model S 75D with a retail price of $75,700 is going for $903 a month for 36 months with $12,037 due at signing and an annual 10,000 mile limit.All of these offers include the aforementioned federal tax credit (which in Tesla’s case is set to phase out during 2019), but not options or fees; the Tesla quote includes sales tax and registration. Since these deals are subject to change, they’re presented purely for illustrative purposes.HERE’S THE CATCHUnfortunately, leasing a vehicle is not for everyone.For starters, the best lease deals are typically limited to those having excellent credit. An applicant’s creditworthiness is based in large part on his or her “FICO” score. Consumers having scores in the 700-850 range will generally garner the most-favorable lease terms. Lessees who fall below the 620 mark are often considered “subprime,” and will be required to pay a higher interest rate and perhaps make a bigger down payment. If your FICO score is below 500, you’ll likely have trouble leasing a car at any cost.What’s more, it may not be all sweetness and light when you return a leased vehicle to the dealership. At the least, you’ll be required to pay a “disposition fee” of a few hundred dollars to cover the cost of resale. You’ll also be assessed an “excessive wear and tear fee” if the vehicle is not in otherwise excellent condition. That means turning it in without dents, deep scratches, window cracks, or torn/stained upholstery, and with all accessories in good working order. You may want to think twice about leasing if you tend to be hard on a car, as reconditioning costs can add up quickly.You’ll also need to be mindful of a lease’s mileage limits, as exceeding them can cost you plenty. Overage penalties can run anywhere from 15 to 35 cents per mile. That means having to pay between $1,500 and $3,500 if you turn in a leased vehicle with an extra 10,000 miles on the odometer. This may not be much of a factor if you’re leasing an EV with only a modest operating range for around-town use. However, if you’re considering a model that can run for 200 miles or more on a charge and suspect you’ll be exceeding the limit, you can usually purchase additional miles in advance at a discounted rate or simply negotiate a lease that grants a higher threshold in the first place.Finally, be aware that auto leases are binding for the entire length of the agreement, and they can be difficult and/or expensive to terminate if your financial situation changes. You may want to reconsider leasing an EV if your finances or employment situation is on shaky ground. Traditionally, those who want to get out of a lease early are either required to lease another vehicle, have the first contract “bought out” as part of the deal, find someone to take over the remainder of the lease, or pay a hefty termination fee.Source: MYEV.com Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 4, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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Tesla Autopilot team loses several more engineers as Elon Musk takes over

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first_imgSource: Charge Forward We are now getting more information about the Tesla Autopilot team restructuring that started in April as a new report lists several Autopilot engineers who have left the automaker. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Tesla Autopilot team loses several more engineers as Elon Musk takes over appeared first on Electrek.last_img read more

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Residential segregation linked with racial disparities in firearm homicide fatalities

By on July 20, 2019

first_imgJul 16 2018Residential segregation is linked to many racial disparities in health, including cancer, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Now, a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers suggests the likelihood of dying from gun violence can be added to the list of adverse health outcomes associated with structural racism in the US.The study, published in the Journal of the National Medical Association, finds states with greater residential segregation of black and white populations have higher racial disparities in firearm homicide fatalities. The study is one of the first to examine the relationship between racial residential segregation and firearm homicide fatalities at a state level over a 25-year period, and controlled for multiple race-specific measures of deprivation in education, employment, economic status, and housing.Related StoriesLiving with advanced breast cancerStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskObese patients with Type 1 diabetes could safely receive robotic pancreas transplant”It was important for us to analyze this at the state level, because in the past we’ve found that a black person living in Wisconsin has a 22-fold higher risk of being fatally shot compared to a white person, but in New Mexico a black person has a 2-fold higher risk of being fatally shot compared to a white person,” says BUSPH pre-doctoral fellow Anita Knopov, the study’s lead author.The researchers used data on annual state-specific firearm homicide rates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) from 1991 through 2015. To measure racial segregation at the state level, the researchers used a well-established measure called the “index of dissimilarity,” which reflects the degree of racial integration within neighborhoods across a state. The scale runs from 0 to 100, with higher numbers representing higher levels of racial residential segregation.For every 10-point increase in the index of dissimilarity, the researchers found the ratio of black to white firearm homicide fatality rates increased by 39 percent. After controlling for levels of white and black deprivation, greater racial segregation continued to be associated with lower white fatality rates and higher black fatality rates.”Racial residential segregation is independently linked with the racial disparity in firearm homicides, even when other racial inequalities are accounted for, including unemployment, poverty, income, wealth, and single-parent families,” says study co-author Michael Siegel, professor of community health sciences at BUSPH.”These findings show that a history of structural racism over decades in the past has significant implications for the lives of black people today.”​ Source:https://www.bmc.orglast_img read more

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Peer comparison letters lead to persistent decrease in antipsychotic prescribing

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first_imgAug 2 2018A study led by Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health has found that letters targeting high prescribers of Seroquel (quetiapine), an antipsychotic with potentially harmful side effects in the elderly, significantly reduced the number of prescriptions for patients in Medicare. The results showed that peer comparison letters led to statistically meaningful, persistent decreases in quetiapine prescribing, with no detected negative effects on patients. The findings are online in JAMA Psychiatry.”Compared with existing work on prescribing quality, our study provides a unique example of a large-scale, low-cost intervention yielding clinically meaningful and long-lasting effects,” said Adam Sacarny, PhD, assistant professor of Health Policy and Management at Columbia’s Mailman School of Public Health and first author. The work was conducted with the Office of Evaluation Sciences in the General Services Administration, which promotes evaluation and testing in the federal government; the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which administers the Medicare program; and researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.The study was a randomized controlled trial targeting the 5,055 highest Seroquel-prescribing primary care physicians nationwide in the Medicare Part D (prescription drug coverage) program in 2013 and 2014. A random half of the doctors were assigned to the treatment arm and received 3 letters comparing their prescribing practices to their peers; the other half received placebo letters about an unrelated Medicare regulation. The treatment arm’s letter stated that the physician’s prescribing of quetiapine high relative to their peers was under review. The text also discussed that high quetiapine prescribing could be appropriate but was concerning for medically unjustified use. The letter encouraged primary care physicians to review their prescribing patterns.The physicians who got the peer comparison letters dropped their overall Seroquel prescribing by 11 percent over the next 9 months and 16 percent over the next 2 years. New initiations of Seroquel dropped even more: 24 percent over 2 years.”Our findings show that for health care organizations and clinicians aiming to improve the quality of prescribing, peer comparison messages could be useful and effective tools, particularly when they are paired with a review of previous prescribing activity,” said Sacarny. “Similar messages could address over-prescribing of other drugs, like opioids, or they could target care that goes against clinical guidelines.”Related StoriesCommon medications can masquerade as dementia in seniorsHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionDementia patients hospitalized and involved in transitional care at higher ratesThe researchers also followed patients who had been treated by the physicians in the study. On average, patients of the treatment group physicians received 6 percent fewer days of Seroquel from all prescribers over 2 years. Patients with a history of dementia, where guidelines discourage Seroquel prescribing, experienced a larger reduction of 8 percent fewer days of Seroquel. There was no evidence of adverse effects on patients due to the letters: use of the emergency department, hospitalizations, and mortality were similar for patients of treatment and control physicians.Seroquel is frequently prescribed “off-label”, or outside its FDA-approved indications, for patients with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease despite a large body of evidence that it is associated with significant harm in these populations. Guidelines from the American Psychiatric Association and the American Geriatrics Society discourage this overuse of antipsychotics including Seroquel. This off-label use against guidelines has attracted the attention of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) and federal oversight agencies.”Overprescribing of antipsychotic drugs is a huge and persistent problem, particularly in the elderly. We think our results are striking for something as simple and cheap as sending letters,” said Dr. Michael Barnett of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the second author on the study. “Beyond the benefit in reducing anti-psychotic use, the intervention could also have implications for how we can nudge physician behavior more broadly.”Sacarny and colleagues showed that with the increasing need to address the dangers of inappropriate prescribing, peer comparison letters targeted at high-risk medications provide one way to efficiently create lasting changes in prescribing patterns. Source:https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/last_img read more

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Innovation Fund Denmark supports research project that aims to fight Clostridium difficile

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first_img Clostridium difficile is an extremely stubborn bacterium that is able to survive even in sterile hospital environments because it makes spores that can withstand both drying and alcohol. In a weakened patient, Clostridium difficile damages the intestine and causes a se-vere diarrhoea condition that can be life-threatening. For one in four patients, the infection returns even after treatment with antibiotics. If the bacterium returns, it is almost impossible to get rid of, and mortality increases. Clostridium difficile is today regarded as one of the most dangerous bacteria for humans. Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 21 2018One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, as the saying goes. If things go to plan, feces from registered and thoroughly tested healthy donors will in a few years be the standard treatment for the bacterium Clostridium difficile at Danish hospitals. This is the goal of a research project that is being backed by the Innovation Fund Denmark to the tune of DKK 17 million – USD 2,7 million – in the period 2019-2023.Medical doctors and researchers have long known that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) – as the treatment is called – is so effective against the stubborn bacterium Clostridium difficile that nine out of ten patients are cured by only a single treatment. In essence, the treatment involves transferring feces from a healthy donor to the intestine of a patient. By comparison, only about one third of patients become healthy using antibiotics, and several centres therefore offer FMT as a trial treatment.However, the problem is that the handling of feces and the use of feces as a treatment places high demands on safety, selection and screening of the feces donors and on pa-tient follow-up. This is where the new research project intends to make a big differ-ence, explains Christian Lodberg Hvas, who is a consultant at Aarhus University Hospital and a clinical associate professor at the Department of Clinical Medicine at Aarhus University. He has been involved in establishing the treatment in Aarhus since 2014 and is one of the researchers who will now administer the investment – among other things, with the establishment of a socalled feces bank and the screening of future fe-ces donors.”The challenge is systemizing everything so that the treatment can be offered to everyone with Clostridium infection and doing this with the highest possible level of safety and effect. This will be one of the main tasks of the upcoming research project,” says Christian Lodberg Hvas.”The effect is really quite dramatic. Clostridium difficile typically affects patients who are already weakened or ill for other reasons. Whereas these patients previously could go through one antibiotic treatment after the other over and over again and experience long periods of diarrhoea and general weakness, with a single treatment we can now prevent the bacteria returning, after which the patient becomes healthy again. At the same time, the number of hospitalisation days also falls significantly, which benefits the patients, hospitals and the economy in general,” he says.Related StoriesCeliac disease may be caused by gastrointestinal infection in childhood’Don’t wash your raw chicken’, warns CDCNew gene therapy cures babies with fatal ‘Bubble Boy’ diseaseOrganisationally, the investment by the Innovation Fund Denmark is made to CEFTA (The Centre for Feces Transplantation) at Aarhus University Hospital, which is headed by Christian Lodberg Hvas, and which has treated 200 critically ill patients with FMT since 2014. The coming development, quality assurance and organisation placement in clinical practice will take place in a collaboration between the Department of Hepatolo-gy and Gastroenterology at Aarhus University Hospital, the Blood Bank at Aarhus University Hospital, the Department of Business and Management at Aalborg University and the National Food Institute at the Technical University of Denmark.”The idea is to use the many years of experience from the blood bank to standardise the selection and screening of feces donors and in this way develop a feces bank that is just as safe as a blood bank. At the same time, the project will contribute to the development of freeze-dried donor feces in the form of capsules that will supplement what we typically do today, which is to provide FMT through an endoscope or probe inserted in the intestines,” explains Christian Lodberg Hvas.”But having said this, our most important product is the scientific publications. It’s more a case of ensuring an effective treatment at Danish hospitals than about making money. The research project will help us on a general level, and we are grateful to the Innovation Fund Denmark for making a contribution to this,” says Christian Lodberg Hvas.More about Clostridium difficile: Source:http://www.au.dk/last_img read more

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Cost Skyrockets for United States Share of ITER Fusion Project

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Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) ITER was supposed to start running by 2016. Since then, however, the project has been plagued by delays, cost increases, and management problem. ITER is now expected to cost at least $21 billion and won’t turn on until 2020 at the earliest. And a recent review slammed ITER’s management.The cost of the U.S. contribution has increased, too, although by how much has been unclear. Officials with U.S. ITER had not released an updated cost profile for several years, until Ned Sauthoff, project manager for U.S. ITER at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, did so yesterday. Speaking to a meeting of the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee in Rockville, Maryland, Sauthoff reported that the total cost of the U.S. contribution would be $3.9 billion by the time the project is done in 2034. The schedule assumes that ITER won’t start running until 2024 or 2025. In comparison, an April 2011 funding profile pegged the cost of U.S. ITER at $2.5 billion.The reason for the difference lies mainly in the timing. The 2011 cost profile would have seen spending on U.S. ITER plateau at $350 million per year from 2014 through 2016. However, in 2013, DOE officials decided (as part of their budget request for the following year) to cap spending on ITER at $225 million per year to prevent the project from consuming the entire budget of DOE’s fusion energy sciences program. Stretching out the budget invariably increases costs, researchers say. This year, the fusion program has a total budget of $505 million, including the $200 million Congress ultimately decided to spend on ITER. Sauthoff stresses that ITER researchers are making concrete progress in construction. “There is very strong progress in the fabrication of components around the world,” he said in an e-mail after the meeting. “US components needed for the construction sequence are being completed for delivery in 2014 and 2015.”The new numbers appear to be giving some members of Congress heartburn. In a separate hearing yesterday on the proposed 2015 budget for DOE, Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), the chair of Energy and Water Development Subcommittee of the Senate Committee on Appropriations, said that a review by DOE officials suggested that the cost of U.S. ITER could rise as high as $6 billion—more, if the concerns over ITER management are not addressed. “I’m really beginning to believe that our involvement in ITER is not practical, that we will not gain what we hope to gain from it, and instead this money could be much better be spent elsewhere,” Feinstein said.Could the United States really back out of ITER? The Obama administration conceives of the U.S. commitment to ITER as being on a par with a treaty agreement, one Washington insider says, so the administration simply cannot walk away from that commitment. But one Senate staffer who works for the Democratic majority says that’s only the administration’s position. In fact, the staffer says, the administration seems to be split, with officials at the State Department arguing that the U.S. commitment to ITER is inviolable and officials at DOE indicating that they’d be just as happy without the project on their hands. The staffer suggests that the conflict explains why the administration requested only $150 million for ITER next year instead of the supposed maximum of $225 million it had set earlier.The Senate staffer suggests that if administration officials can’t make up their minds about ITER, Congress could do it for them in the next several months, as they write annual spending bills. “Our intention is make a decision for ourselves in our markup [of the 2015] budget,” the staffer says. “They won’t have a choice.” ITER, the international fusion experiment under construction in Cadarache, France, aims to prove that nuclear fusion is a viable power source by creating a “burning plasma” that produces more energy than the machine itself consumes. Although that goal is at least 20 years away, ITER is already burning through money at a prodigious pace. The United States is only a minor partner in the project, which began construction in 2008. But the U.S. contribution to ITER will total $3.9 billion—roughly four times as much as originally estimated—according to a new cost estimate released yesterday. That is about $1.4 billion higher than a 2011 cost estimate, and the numbers are likely to intensify doubts among some members of Congress about continuing the U.S. involvement in the project.The United States and ITER share a complicated history. The project was first proposed in 1985 as a joint venture with the Soviet Union and Japan. The United States backed out of that effort in 1998, citing concerns over cost and feasibility—only to jump in again in 2003. At the time, ITER was envisioned to cost roughly $5 billion. That estimate had grown to $12 billion by 2006, when the European Union, China, India, Japan, Russia, South Korea, and United States signed a formal agreement to build the device. The United States agreed, essentially, to build 9% of the parts for the reactor, at whatever price was necessary. read more

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European Spallation Source ready to start construction

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Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Having secured about 97.5% of its construction money from 13 member countries, the European Spallation Source (ESS) has announced that it will break ground in Lund, Sweden, in the fall—more than a year later than first planned.“We are thrilled to be able to move ahead,” ESS Director-General Jim Yeck said in a statement on Friday. In February 2011, ESS’s 17 partner countries agreed to work together on the project, but each government then had to negotiate its contribution individually. “Each country went through its own independent process of deciding to join, and fund ESS, and that takes time.”ESS’s announcement came on the same day as Germany said it would pony up 11% of the construction’s €1.8 billion price tag, plus €15 million a year for operating costs thereafter. This was the tipping point to get the construction going, after similar agreements with other member countries in recent months. (The United Kingdom agreed in March to cover 10% of the costs, and Spain said in February that it would pay a 5% slice. Sweden, the main host country, will foot 35% of the bill.) “It was a long overdue decision,” says Peter Tindemans, secretary-general of the European researchers’ organization EuroScience, who served as ESS chair from 2000 to 2010. “[ESS was] working hard on it … but I’m surprised by how long it took to get these results.”Tindemans says tight finances partly explain why it took so long to complete the negotiations. Last month, for example, Germany withdrew from the Square Kilometre Array, a giant international radioastronomy project, seemingly because of “difficult national financial circumstances.” Another reason for the delay is that countries provide in-kind contributions and not only cash, which makes the negotiation process more complicated, Tindemans adds.ESS is a European project to build a high-power neutron source, producing very bright neutron beams to study the fine structure of materials. Instead of a nuclear reactor, ESS will use a proton beam colliding with a metallic target to produce the neutrons—a process known as spallation. The first experiments are expected to begin in 2023, with up to 3000 visiting scientists using the facility every year.At the moment, ESS is a public company owned by Sweden and Denmark. It has applied to become a European Research Infrastructure Consortium, which would be owned by all the member countries and enjoy privileged conditions, including tax exemptions. read more

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Live from AAAS

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first_imgScience’s news team is in San Jose this week covering the annual meeting of AAAS (which publishes Science). Every day, we’ll bring you stories from the conference, including breaking news, Q&A’s with prominent scientists, and more. We’ll also be asking meeting attendees—and all of you at home—to share your answer to this question: “What message would you send into space?” Send us your answers on Twitter and Vine with #msgtospace!Stay tuned for more from San Jose!last_img read more

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More restrictive US policy on Chinese graduate student visas raises alarm

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first_imgChinese graduate students in some fields may now receive 1-year visas. OneDay0619/shutterstock.com Email But some U.S. policymakers believe that influx of talent may also pose additional risks to the country. The Chinese government’s aggressive efforts to acquire foreign technologies by any means have triggered a fierce political debate over whether universities and their faculty members are doing enough to help safeguard U.S. military secrets and intellectual property.Senator John Cornyn (R–TX), who chaired the 6 June hearing, doesn’t think so. He told the story of a university president who confessed to him that his institution had been “infiltrated” by foreign “scientists” working there who were subsequently arrested as they tried to leave the country. Cornyn didn’t specify their nationalities, nor the charges. But after the hearing, Cornyn said he’s worried many university leaders “don’t prioritize national security concerns” and that scientists are typically “focused on attracting good students and just doing their research.”Anticipating criticism from Democrats that the new visa policy unfairly singles out Chinese students, Cornyn asserted at the hearing that not only does China supply by far the most students (see chart, below) but also that its policies warrant extra attention. “The second largest source is India, but clearly, it does not have an authoritarian government and it is an open society,” he says. In contrast, the Communist Party calls the shots in China, Cornyn added, and the government “makes no distinction between the public and private sector.”  More restrictive U.S. policy on Chinese graduate student visas raises alarm Reversing yet another policy of the previous administration, the U.S. Department of State today began applying tougher restrictions on some Chinese graduate students. The new policy shortens from 5 years to 1 year the duration of visas for those planning to study aviation, robotics, and advanced manufacturing. Although the ostensible reason for the change is to improve national security, U.S. university officials see it as the latest attack on graduate education and the free flow of scientific knowledge.The revised visa policy was initially reported last month by various media outlets and confirmed last week by a senior departmental official during a hearing on student visas by a Senate panel on border security and immigration. The title of the hearing paints the dilemma in stark terms: “Student Visa Integrity: Protecting Educational Opportunity and National Security.”The new rule will make it harder for the affected Chinese students to attend international conferences and to work collaboratively with scientists abroad, U.S. higher education officials say. It may also curtail periodic visits back home. When added to other policies by the current administration that affect non-U.S. citizens, academic officials say, the visa change gives these talented foreign students one more reason to pursue advanced degrees in countries with lower barriers to entry. “For decades, doing their graduate work in the U.S. was a no-brainer” for the best Chinese students, says Wojtek Chodzko-Zajko, graduate dean at the University of Illinois in Champaign. “But now, they have to decide if they really want to come here.” Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) “Uncertainties and confusion”Reconciling U.S. national security with global science has always been a challenge. And the relationship became more strained after the 2001 terrorist attacks in the United States prompted increased vetting of all visitors to the country. In 2004, U.S. universities and scientific organizations began to express concern to officials serving under then-President George W. Bush about the “unintended consequences … of new procedures and policies [that] have made the visa issuance process inefficient, lengthy, and opaque.” They kept up the pressure and after former President Barack Obama took office, the State Department addressed one of their concerns. Consular officers were given authority to grant 5-year visas to Chinese students, up from the 1-year limit that had long existed. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Jeffrey MervisJun. 11, 2018 , 12:10 PM But President Donald Trump has moved in the other direction since taking office, with calls for “extreme vetting” of immigrants, student and work visa applicants, and even tourists. For example, his administration has proposed analyzing the social media activity of millions of visa applicants going back 5 years. Higher education organizations have questioned the policy, saying there’s no evidence that such increased scrutiny would make the country any safer. They have also complained about the “uncertainties and confusion” surrounding the proposal, noting that the departments of State and Homeland Security disagree on which groups would be affected and whether their social media would continue to be monitored during their stay.Any additional roadblocks for foreign graduate students are potentially worrisome for U.S. graduate programs in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields, which have become increasingly dependent on a steady flow of international students. And China provides nearly one-third of those students after a decade of steady growth (see graph, below). The State Department’s witness, Edward Ramotowski, did not mention the new rules in his opening statement. But the panel’s top Democrat, Illinois Senator Richard Durbin, asked him to confirm the rumors that, as of 11 June, “Chinese graduate students would be limited to 1-year visas if they’re studying in certain fields such as robotics, aviation, and high-tech manufacturing.”“Senator, we have issued some additional screening instructions to U.S. embassies and consulates to deal with certain individuals from China studying in certain sensitive fields,” Ramotowski answered. “It would not be appropriate to discuss the details of those internal instructions in an open hearing, but what I can tell you is that these are screening measures. They don’t in and of themselves prohibit the entry of anyone into the United States or restrict access to our country.”Ramatowski, who oversees visa services for the State Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs in Washington, D.C., did provide the panel with some insight into the department’s rationale for the shorter visas. He said “undergraduates present a lesser risk than graduate students or postdocs,” implicitly providing the reason why the new policy applies only to those seeking advanced degrees. The State Department, he added, is already tracking graduate students at research universities who change their majors or chose a new research area after starting their training.At the moviesAfter leaving the hearing, Ramotowski declined to answer questions from ScienceInsider about how the new policy would be implemented. But experts on U.S visa policy used their knowledge to make some educated guesses about its impact on Chinese students.One expert likened the key visa issue to needing a ticket stub to re-enter a movie theater after going out for refreshments or a bathroom break. For foreign students, the new rules mean their “ticket” is now valid for 1 year, rather than 5 years. They can stay for the duration of their training, assuming they don’t do anything to break the terms of their visa. But if they leave the “theater,” they won’t be readmitted if more than 1 year has elapsed since they arrived. Instead, they must go back home—or to a closer U.S. neighbor such as Canada or Mexico—and apply for a visa renewal. The process could take weeks or months.The implications for graduate training are what troubles Chodzko-Zajko, whose university hosted 2600 Chinese graduate and professional students, along with 3300 undergraduates from China this year. “We might need to tell those studnts, if you come here, you’d better be prepared for the possibility that you won’t be going home, and you won’t be attending international conferences to present data and network,” he says. “It’s not that you have to finish your program in 1 year. But it puts them at a competitive disadvantage against students from the U.S., or the European Union, or even elsewhere in Asia.”“Students have become much more savvy about their career prospects,” he adds. “And once the word gets around, some of them might decide it makes more sense to go somewhere else.”Zhang Tao, a control engineer at Tsinghua University in Beijing who works in robotics and aviation, is worried that a master’s student who wants to study in the United States will be shut out. “My students are considering Japan and other countries where it might be easier to get a visa and realize their future plans,” he says. Students and faculty aren’t the only ones affected by the change in U.S. visa policy. Parents can also be easily spooked, says one Chinese graduate student who requested anonymity.“Most students rely on their parents for financial support when pursuing a higher degree abroad,” says the student, one of several studying robotics and aerospace engineering at Tsinghua who expressed concern about the change. “And parents who may not know much about the details of the new policy become anxious and start to question the benefits of continuing language education, overseas internships, visiting student programs, and graduate school applications.”An easy workaround?The unstated reason for the shorter visas is that the U.S. government can keep students with malevolent intentions on a shorter leash. But the former deputy chief of mission at the U.S. Embassy to China, Dave Rank, doesn’t buy that argument. He is skeptical that it will improve homeland security, arguing that the consulate officers who vet visa applications are ill-equipped to ferret out potential spies.“I’m not even sure what … you’re trying to screen for,” says Rank, a career foreign service officer who quit his post last year to protest Trump’s decision to leave the Paris climate treaty. “Is this person going to learn something and then take it back and then apply it in a sector affiliated with the Chinese security services writ large? If the goal is to detect such people ahead of time and deny them access to U.S. graduate programs,” he says, “I’m not sure you can screen for that.”Rank is also dubious that a 1-year visa would deter any would-be Chinese spy. “Someone whose intention is to go and surreptitiously learn things that can be passed along to the Chinese security services … could just not go back until they’re done with their studies,” he says. “It’s not a hugely difficult workaround.”Rank agrees that the U.S. government needs to take steps to reduce its vulnerability to intellectual property theft and foreign espionage. But he thinks those steps must be consistent with traditional U.S. values.“As a guy who blew up his career over [the policies of] the Trump administration, I can’t completely dismiss what’s behind this larger issue,” he says. “China looks at technology, national security, and the free flow of scientific learning from a very different perspective than the United States has traditionally taken, where transparency and openness has been the hallmark of our scientific endeavor. To the extent that we work against those strengths, we are not going to be successful.”With reporting by Catherine Matacic and Dennis Normile.last_img read more

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What lives in the oceans twilight zone New technologies might finally tell

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first_imgResearchers know it teems with life, including fish, crustaceans, jellies, worms, and squids. And they have speculated, based on acoustic and net surveys, that the total biomass of midwater fish might dwarf the current global catch of surface-dwelling fish by 100 times. But they have struggled to document this twilight ecosystem. “The big questions are who are the players [and] who’s eating who,” says biological oceanographer Mark Benfield of Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. There are “species just waiting to be discovered,” says WHOI physical oceanographer Gordon Zhang.The project also aims to get a better grip on how twilight zone creatures influence the global carbon cycle. Midwater organisms perform perhaps the biggest daily migration on the planet, rising each night toward the surface to feast on a sunlight-fed bounty of plankton and fish. Then, as the sun rises, they sink back to the depths. That plunge prevents carbon captured at the surface from going “right back into the atmosphere,” where it would amplify global warming, says marine ecologist Tracey Sutton of Nova Southeastern University in Dania Beach, Florida.Traditional tools have proved inadequate for exploring midwater ecosystems. Ship-mounted acoustical sensors—which use sound waves to locate objects—have trouble precisely detecting deep-swimming organisms. Towed nets can crush beyond recognition the gelatinous creatures found in the midwater. Because many are bioluminescent, the catch can resemble a ball of fire within the mesh, scaring away other animals. The pressure wave formed by an oncoming net can also warn off creatures.Deep-See is engineered to overcome those challenges. “It’s the equivalent of having the ship down at 600 meters,” Benfield says. That allows the sled’s acoustic sensors to deliver higher resolution data, because the sound waves don’t have to pass through hundreds of meters of water. And because the sensors track seven different frequency bands, they might allow researchers to discern an animal’s size and possibly even species. “It’s like color TV versus black and white,” Lavery says.Deep-See’s cameras, meanwhile, can image creatures as small as 50 microns in length, seven times per second. Other devices measure light and environmental variables. All told, 2 terabytes of data flow by cable from the rig to the ship each hour.During Deep-See’s recent trial, researchers compared the animals captured by the acoustic sensors and cameras to those caught in nets. The acoustic sensors imaged “big fish just a few meters away,” says marine biologist Michael Jech of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in Woods Hole. But the large lights used by the cameras appeared to scare away creatures. The scientists are now brainstorming solutions, Jech says, which might include slowing the tow and trying different light colors.WHOI scientists have already scheduled two more OTZ cruises and expect many more, across the globe, by the time the project ends in 2024. As a finale, they hope to establish permanent, tethered monitoring observatories in the midwater. “Who knows what we’ll have in 20 years,” Benfield says. “We may look at Deep-See as a primitive forerunner.”Funding for the project is coming from an unusual source: The Audacious Project, a new initiative by TED, the ideas-spreading nonprofit based in New York City. Audacious raises money from multiple private donors and vets proposals on their behalf, which cuts paperwork for grantees. Over the past 3 years, it has made seven awards, including the OTZ initiative, a methane-sensing satellite, and health care and hunger programs.OTZ scientists are now combing through the more than 30 gigabytes of data they amassed. One goal: to see whether the data confirm that first impression of abundant midwater life. They are also looking ahead. “The big thing I want,” Lavery says, “is to get Deep-See out in the ocean again soon.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The sea’s murky depths might host more life than we thought. That’s the preliminary conclusion of scientists who this week completed the inaugural cruise of the Ocean Twilight Zone (OTZ) initiative, a 6-year, $35 million effort that is using innovative technologies—and an unusual funding model—to document the ocean’s mysterious midwater layer.The weeklong North Atlantic Ocean expedition was aimed primarily at testing the OTZ initiative’s new workhorse: a 5-meter-long towed sled, dubbed Deep-See, that bristles with cameras, acoustic sensors, and samplers. But the trial also produced some eye-opening observations. At times when traditional surface instruments traced just a single, relatively dense layer of midwater organisms beneath the ship, for instance, Deep-See revealed a host of creatures distributed throughout the twilight zone, which extends from 200 meters to 1000 meters below the surface. “We kept seeing organisms all the way down,” says Andone Lavery, a physicist with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in Massachusetts, which is leading the project. “That was really surprising.”It was a promising start for OTZ scientists. They are targeting a little known ocean layer, between easily studied surface waters and the dark abyss, which submersibles have explored. “The midwater zone has been severely neglected,” says Heidi Sosik, a biological oceanographer with WHOI. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe LARRY MADIN, © WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION center_img The dynamic midwater ocean teems with organisms such as this bristle worm. Email By Eli KintischAug. 23, 2018 , 10:45 AM What lives in the ocean’s twilight zone? New technologies might finally tell uslast_img read more

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Hospitals suspension of evidencebased medicine expert sparks new controversy

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first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Hospital’s suspension of evidence-based medicine expert sparks new controversy SCANPIX DENMARK/REUTERS/Newscom Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Gretchen Vogel, Martin EnserinkNov. 7, 2018 , 5:00 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email The researcher at the center of a controversy roiling Cochrane, an international network of doctors and researchers, headquartered in London, that promotes evidence-based medicine, has been suspended as head of the Nordic Cochrane Centre in Copenhagen. Peter Gøtzsche, who was a founding member of Cochrane in 1993, has attracted attention for his outspoken critiques of pharmaceutical companies—and sometimes of Cochrane itself. In September, Cochrane’s governing board voted to remove him for “a consistent pattern of disruptive and inappropriate behaviours.” That decision led four other board members to resign in protest. Two weeks later, Gøtzsche said he would withdraw the Nordic Cochrane Centre from the international organization.That was unacceptable to the board, however. In an interview with Science last month, Cochrane co-chair Marguerite Koster, a senior manager at Kaiser Permanente, said Cochrane CEO Mark Wilson would try to convince the Rigshospitalet in Copenhagen and the Danish government, which funds the Nordic Cochrane Center, to keep the center within the collaboration. Because he’s been ousted as a member, “Peter Gøtzsche no longer is the director of the Nordic Cochrane Center,” she argued. The board also took control of the website for the center and removed Gøtzsche’s statements about the case from it; he has since posted updates about the fight on his own website.It’s unclear whether Cochrane’s lobbying has had any effect, but yesterday, the Rigshospitalet, which hosts the Nordic Cochrane Centre, announced it had suspended Gøtzsche. “We’re striving to ensure that the Nordic Cochrane Centre continues as part of the international Cochrane Collaboration,” Deputy Chief Executive Per Jørgensen said in a statement. A spokesperson told Science the hospital would not give any further reasons for the suspension. Assistant Director Karsten Juhl Jørgensen has been appointed as acting head of the center, and the hospital has asked the University of Copenhagen to take over supervision of its graduate students. In response, more than 3500 health care professionals, scientists, and public health advocates signed a letter protesting the hospital’s move to the Danish minister of health, who oversees the hospital as part of the national health system. Spanish politician David Hammerstein Mintz, one of the Cochrane board members who resigned in September, coordinated the petition, which gathered signatures for 3 days. Fiona Godlee, editor-in-chief of The BMJ, and Iain Chalmers, another founder of Cochrane, were among the signers. The letter states that Gøtzsche’s work has “played a pivotal role in favor of the transparency of clinical data, the priority of public health needs and the defense of rigorous medical research carried out independently of conflicts of interest.” The signers urge the minister “to reconsider this possible dismissal.”Gerd Antes, an evidence-based medicine expert at the Center for Advanced Studies at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany, and former head of the Cochrane Germany in Freiburg says he is “amazed” at the number of signatures. “How do you get 3000 people signing something in 3 days? This shows how wrong the board is,” he says. He says although Gøtzsche “has made mistakes … the actions of the board were devastatingly incompetent.”Gøtzsche says he was informed last week that he was being suspended. “The only reason that they gave was that they no longer had confidence in my leadership,” he told Science. He says he is working with a lawyer to challenge the move.Cochrane, meanwhile, is calling for applications for board members to replace the four who resigned. Applications close next week, and voting is scheduled to begin later this month.last_img read more

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Megalibraries of nanomaterials could speed clean energy and other grand challenge targets

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first_imgE. Kluender et al., PNAS 10.1073 (2018) ‘Megalibraries’ of nanomaterials could speed clean energy and other grand challenge targets Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Lightweight armors, synthetic fuels, and new high-efficiency solar cells could all be the outcome of a new high-speed technique for discovering advanced materials made from ultrasmall flecks of matter.In the materials world, size matters. Particularly on the smallest length scales of just billionths of a meter, or nanometers. Nanomaterials are famous for having different optical, electrical, and catalytic properties than bulk chunks of the exact same stuff. But that makes exploring the endless possible combinations of multiple elements of different nanoscale sizes a near impossibility.Now, there’s help. Researchers have come up with a high-speed approach to make “megalibraries” of up to 5 billion combinations of different nanomaterials that vary in a controlled manner, based on the concentration of different elements they contain and the sizes of the resulting particles. To make the arrays, the team used a specialized device that contains hundreds of thousands of pyramid-shaped tips to stamp individual polymer wells of various sizes and composition, each loaded with different metal salts of interest. The stamped surface is then heated, burning away the polymer and causing the metals to form alloy particles. By Robert F. ServiceDec. 20, 2018 , 5:35 PM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The scientists tested one such array, pictured above, and discovered a new catalyst able to make straw-shaped carbon nanotubes—prized for their ultrahigh strength and ability to serve as tiny high-speed transistors—faster than any catalyst previously discovered, as they report this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The discoveries aren’t likely to stop there, as the researchers plan to test myriad other nanomaterials in search of new and improved catalysts, electronic, and optical materials. Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

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Robert Zemeckis to Remake The Witches – Angelica Huston not Impressed

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first_imgAnne Hathaway heads up the cast of Robert Zemeckis’ new film, an adaptation of The Witches, based on Roald Dahl’s 1983 novel. The film is set to hit the big screen on October 16, 2020. Octavia Spencer (The Help) joined the cast in mid-February 2018, with Blackish director Kenya Barris expected to co-write the script with Zeneckis.Oscar winner Anne Hathaway is reportedly starring as the Grand High Witch, a role played by Anjelica Huston in the first adaptation of the children’s book in 1990. The book is about a boy who stumbles across a coven of witches who secretly inhabit the world — and hate children.Anne Hathaway. Photo by ONU Brasil CC BY 3.0Sources say that the new film will be truer to the Dahl novel than its predecessor. According to The Wrap although the 1990 film gained a cult following, it turned out to be a box office flop and was publicly disowned by Dahl shortly before he passed away. The sticking point was that the film changed the ending of his book which he creatively disagreed with.Variety reports. Octavia Spencer would play the grandmother of Bruno’s character, and Eastick is portraying the other boy who takes on the Witches.Octavia SpencerHathaway last appeared in the summer hit Ocean’s 8, a spinoff of the Ocean’s Eleven movies.The Witches holds a special place in the affections of those who admire Roald Dahl. Originally published in 1983, the storyline is set in both England and Norway. However, it was controversial from the first, with some critics deriding the book as sexist.“The Witches is a timeless book and movie about the enterprising strength and brilliance of independent women. At first look, it might seem like a misogynist portrayal of the female sex — positioning them as ugly, cold, and in need of being destroyed in order to suppress their domination of the world — but that is far from the case,” says syfy.com.Roald DahlThe site goes on to say that although the goal of the women is to turn all children into mice, the depiction of women working together and supporting each other is a strong image of female solidarity. We shall see which direction this new film will take it in.Related Video: 16 Best Oscar Wilde Quotes:The 1990 film was directed by Nicolas Roeg, and Rowan Atkinson co-starred with Huston. Dahl did not like this version, saying he was “appalled” at “the vulgarity, the bad taste” and “actual terror” in certain parts of the movie.It took Angelica Huston some eight hours of make up time to transform into the iconic role of  Grand High Witch. When asked by Entertainment Weekly about the remake, Huston was not upbeat about the project, “I don’t really know why because I think Nick Roeg made the ultimate Witches…It was his particular brand of wit and irony that made it what it was.”Angelica Huston pictured in 2014. Photo by Mingle Media TV CC BY SA 2.0Roger Ebert said in his review that it was the first film aimed at children directed by Roeg and that the director usually infuses twisted, at times sinister elements to his films, in that case the grotesque depiction of the witches and mice children, who have to face real world predicaments. The result being, in his opinion, Roeg’s movie might have come off as too intense for many young viewers.Nicolas Roeg. Photo by che CC BY-SA 2.5Ebert concluded that “The Witches is an intriguing movie, ambitious and inventive, and almost worth seeing just for Anjelica Huston’s obvious delight in playing a completely uncompromised villainess.”Read another story from us: Mel Gibson to Remake Controversial 1969 Western ‘The Wild Bunch’The new film was originally the project of Guillermo del Toro, until it migrated to Robert Zemeckis.last_img read more

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Manual to provide guidelines for public assistance programme

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first_imgShareTweetSharePinParticipants at the workshopThe government of Dominica has been presented with a draft manual which seeks to to give guidelines on how best to administer public assistance.The manual, which was created by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), was presented to the Ministry of Health and Social Services.Village Council chairpersons, clerks, mayors and district development officers on Friday attended a Public Assistance Programme Operations Manual Capacity Building Workshop, the objective of which, was to “build capacity and knowledge at the local and central government level to implement the manual.Chief Welfare Officer, Leroy MorvanChief Welfare Officer, Leroy Morvan said that at present, there are no set guidelines or manuals by which public assistance is administered and this manual will set such guidelines.The topics discussed at the workshop include programme Operations, Referrals, Standard Operating Procedures and  a Feedback mechanism for Public Assistance Programme. The Organizational Capacity, Roles in Coordination of Services, Child Protections, Policy and Legislative framework: Social Protection.The island was divided into two zones for the UNICEF funded workshop. A session was held on Friday for participants from the south, east and south-east of Dominica and the workshop for participants from the north, west and north-east takes place today [Monday May 20].The Ministry of Ecclesiastical Affairs, Family and Gender Affairs also received a copy of the draft manual and are collaborating with the Ministry of Health and Social Services on this pilot operating manual.Immediately after Hurricane Maria in 2017, UNICEF made available cash assistance to every home in Dominica where there were children and the elderly. That money was paid through the office of the village council.last_img read more

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Josh Craner and Julie McCray honored as business leaders

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first_imgPhoto by Toni GibbonsWinners at the Snowflake-Taylor Chamber of Commerce Annual Award Banquet included (left to right) Neil Trevor, northeast division manager with Arizona Public Service; Bruce Lawler, general manager of Smithfield Farms; Dawn Reddick, Lary and Christine Griffin with Equine WellBeing Rescue; C.H. Packer; Lori Crockett, with Compass Medical Center; Julie McCray with World Financial Group; Kaylee Willis; Kendall Bryant, owner of Snowflake Smokehouse; Lonnie Lopez, meat cutter with Snowflake Smokehouse; and Josh and Candace Craner with Black Diamond Auto Glass. Josh Craner and Julie McCray honored as business leaders By Toni Gibbons       The Snowflake-Taylor Chamber of Commerce Annual Awards Banquet on April 3 recognized local businesses and leaders within the communities of Snowflake and Taylor.       The honor of Business Man ofSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adcenter_img April 10, 2019last_img read more

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President Kovind to inaugurate additional block of Supreme Court today

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first_imgThe additional complex, the foundation stone for which was laid on September 2012, was built in order to cope up with the space constraints in the old court building. The total built-up area of the complex is 1,80,700 square metres.An official note read “it has strong architectural and design similarities with the existing Supreme Court which was built more than 60 years ago…the curvature of the building, makes it look in every way, a modern-day manifestation of the original…”The complex has been designed as GRIHA (Green Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment) compliant rated energy-efficient building complex. The rooftop has a solar power grid-connected system and has the maximum power capacity in Delhi NCR — 1400 kWp (kilowatt peak). The grid is capable of managing 40% of the peak consumption. Related News The Supreme Court annexe in New Delhi. Express Photo by Praveen Khanna.President Ram Nath Kovind on Wednesday will inaugurate the newly constructed annexe of the Supreme Court. The Chief Justice of India Ranjan Gogoi and other judges of the top court will be present at the inauguration. SC rules: Rebel Karnataka MLAs can’t be compelled to participate in trust vote Advertising Karnataka crisis: SC verdict a moral victory for rebel MLAs, says Yeddyurappa The new state-of-the-art annexe building will have five functional blocks and one service block. Each block is four to nine-storey high and has a three-level basement with car parking capacity of about 1800 units. The basements are connected to the old complex of the apex court by three all weather underground passages.The complex also has two auditoriums, with a seating capacity of about 620 and 250 persons as well as a conference-cum-meeting room. By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Published: July 17, 2019 9:45:04 am Advertising Harish Salve: The lawyer who represented India in Kulbhushan Jadhav case Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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This ancient bird sported a ginormous toe

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first_img By Sabine GalvisJul. 11, 2019 , 11:00 AM This ancient bird sported a ginormous toe Zhongda Zhang/Current Biology Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) It’s unclear what the bird—which the researchers have christened Elektorornis chenguangi (seen in this artist’s conception)—used the toe for. (Elektorornis means “amber bird,” and the second half of the name is a nod to the discoverer of the fossil, Chen Guang.) Lengthy toes are a common feature of tree-dwelling animals like squirrels and monkeys because they improve branch grip. Researchers speculate that the unusual adaptation may have been used to dig food out of tree trunks. Whatever the reason, it wasn’t a feature that caught on. Elektorornis vanished with the dinosaurs 66 million years ago, leaving no modern descendants. Imagine having a toe as long as your shin. That’s essentially what researchers have found in a bird foot trapped in amber for nearly 100 million years. The appendage features an extremely long third toe never before seen in birds.Amber dealers suspected the fossil foot, originally found in the Hukawng Valley of Myanmar in 2014, belonged to a lizard, which are known for their long toes. But lizards have five toes, suggesting the sample belonged to a bird instead.In the new study, researchers used detailed x-ray scans to create a 3D model of the foot. They then compared it with the feet of more than 80 modern and ancient birds. The fossil’s third toe, which measures nearly 10 millimeters, is 20% longer than its lower leg and more than 40% longer than its second toe, the team reports today in Current Biology. No other bird—living or extinct—sports such an appendage.last_img read more

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New study assessing SSI incidence paves way for future research into nursing

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first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 26 2018A recent study assessing the relationship between nursing specialty certification rates and surgical site infections (SSI) provides an innovative option for future research exploring relationships between nursing and hospital procedures and medical and/or surgical adverse events. Published in the July/August issue of the Journal of Nursing Administration (JONA), the peer-reviewed journal for nursing managers and executives, the research was conducted by representatives from the University of Kansas Medical Center, the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI), the Competency & Credentialing Institute (CCI) and the University of Wyoming. It was sponsored through a grant from CCI.The study examined data from 69 hospitals, 346 units and 6,585 registered nurses (RNs) participating in the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI), as well as the Centers for Disease Control National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) SSI data on 22,188 patients who underwent colon (COLO) and abdominal hysterectomy (HYST) procedures. The study found higher American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) scores, longer surgical procedure time, and contaminated or dirty wounds were associated with higher SSI occurrence.”This study represents the first time researchers have had the opportunity to review extensive amounts of data for nursing outcomes by combining a large, nursing-focused database (NDNQI) with a large national database of patient outcomes (NHSN) and paves the way for future models of study down the road,” said Emily Cramer, Ph.D., research assistant professor, University of Kansas Medical Center and study researcher. “Having access to this level of detail into care settings, procedures, nursing education and certification, surgical details, patient wound characteristics, and more allows us to have a unique understanding of what is truly impactful and essential when it comes to what surgical nurses require to ensure successful patient care.”The study authors utilized a “structure-process-outcome” framework utilized by Tavlov & colleagues, finding that structures and processes of care influenced care outcome. Effects of structure–provider (nurse), patient, and system (hospital) characteristics–were examined on the outcome of SSI. Utilizing this framework allowed researchers to control for other structural characteristics that might affect SSI occurrence, including: 1) system characteristics, such as Magnet ® status, ownership, and teaching status; 2) provider characteristics, such as nursing education and years on the unit; and 3) patient characteristics of ASA score and wound class. (See Figure 1. SSI study structure, process and outcome variables.)The study also found 40 percent lower odds for SSIs among hospitals with Magnet® designation after adjusting for other hospital characteristics, patient/procedure characteristics, certification rates, and RN covariates.Related StoriesApplication of machine learning methods to healthcare outcomes researchStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementia”These findings reinforce the already well-known and well-researched benefits of Magnet® status within a hospital system,” said James Stobinski, PhD, RN, CNOR, CSSM, CEO, CCI, and study author. “Whether for recruiting top talent, maintaining a superior level of patient care and safety, or fostering a collaborative environment, the benefits of obtaining Magnet hospital status provides returns on investment and ample opportunity for nursing and hospital staff growth. The results of this study remind us of the intrinsic benefits of Magnet status to hospital staff and patients alike.”Moving forward, the researchers hope to explore further the relevance of Needleman’s recently proposed Expanded Conceptual Model for Credentialing in Nursing. Needleman’s expanded theory adds three intervening pathways between structure and outcomes (i.e. “invisible architecture”) such as organizational and unit climate, culture and leadership, including how specialty-certified nurses provide secondary benefits to those not in their care, creating multiple associations and causal pathways that affect outcomes.”The two large national databases contained multiple levels of data, so we have access to an overwhelming amount of information, but the datasets lacked information about organizational invisible architecture that may hinder or enhance nursing autonomy and patient success,” said Diane K. Boyle, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, Professor at the Whitney School of Nursing, University of Wyoming and study author. “To build upon the findings of this study, we would next hope to explore the concept of nursing autonomy within Needleman’s theoretical framework in a given setting and its benefits to nurses amongst co-workers, with other medical staff, with patients, and within the larger hospital setting.”The study was a secondary analysis of 2014 data from the NHSN and the NDNQI annual RN survey, including more than 285,000 nurses on more than 16,000 units, spanning perioperative, surgical intensive care (SICU) and medical-surgical intensive care (MSICU), in nearly 850 hospitals. Participating NDNQI hospitals were required to submit 2014 SSI data to NHSN, resulting in 72 hospitals submitting 2014 NHSN SSI data on COCO and HYST surgical procedures to NDNQI.The analysis was restricted to hospitals with eligible perioperative units, adult SICU, MSICU, surgical units, and M/S units, as well as hospitals where at least one perioperative unit and at least one SICU, MSICU, surgical, or M/S unit participated in the survey. To complete the NDNQI survey, RNs must have been employed on the unit for at least three months and spent fifty percent or more of their time in direct patient care.Source: http://www.seacrestcompany.com/last_img read more

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